high school – End Grade Inflation http://endgradeinflation.org/ Sun, 17 Apr 2022 02:08:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://endgradeinflation.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png high school – End Grade Inflation http://endgradeinflation.org/ 32 32 What is the “mini-week”? A special report from Haines High School students | KHNS Radio https://endgradeinflation.org/what-is-the-mini-week-a-special-report-from-haines-high-school-students-khns-radio/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 06:21:01 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/what-is-the-mini-week-a-special-report-from-haines-high-school-students-khns-radio/ Colin Aldassy interviews Matilda Rogers about her ‘Mini-Week’ experience (Photo courtesy of Giselle Miller) Haines High School reporters tell us what happens when a large majority of their students travel to play sports, and the students who stay at home experience what is called the “mini-week “. Haines senior Trygve Bakke and freshmen Colin Aldassy […]]]>

Colin Aldassy interviews Matilda Rogers about her ‘Mini-Week’ experience (Photo courtesy of Giselle Miller)

Haines High School reporters tell us what happens when a large majority of their students travel to play sports, and the students who stay at home experience what is called the “mini-week “. Haines senior Trygve Bakke and freshmen Colin Aldassy and Willow Bryant report:


Last week, with the many participants of the Region V basketball tournament departing, a third of the students at Haines High School were left behind in a whirlwind. These students did not continue with their usual course load, but instead participated in a “mini-week”: a week-long event of specialized classes taught by community members around a theme.

So there’s an opportunity every year to have what’s called a mini-week,” said Sam McPhetres. It is a computer science teacher at Haines High School and was one of the leaders of the Mini-week program, which has been running for 12 years.

This year, we have chosen to do outdoor safety. We are very lucky to have Alaska State Trooper Colin Nemec come in and do a cold water safety course,” McPhetres said.

At the pool in Haines, Cavalier Nemec asks a group of students to jump into the water and practice putting on survival suits. They also had to learn to empty their wetsuits after stepping onto the edge of the pool, as if crawling on the shore.

My name is Koa Doddridge. I’m an eleventh grader here, so I’m a freshman at Haines High, and this week I took cold water safety. We had a lot of training on putting on survival suits, getting in and out, in the water, out of the water, and putting on life jackets and learning the different levels.

To wrap up the course, the students brought in guest instructors from the Juneau Coast Guard to help facilitate an open water rescue and the safety of boaters on Portage Cove.

Today was our last day of class. We have to get on the soldiers’ boat and swim out to land with the survival suits in the salt water,” Doddridge said.

“The hardest part of the day was not panicking once we got into the water without our survival suits because it’s like below zero right now,” said Ryland Jorgenson- Geise. He is a freshman experiencing Mini week for the first time.

Trygve Bakke interviews Ryland Jorgenson-Geise on cold water safety (Photo courtesy of Giselle Miller)

“What I’ve learned from this week is that we don’t want to hang around cold water unless we’re prepared for it,” Jorgenson-Geise said.

While some students struggled with cold water for survival, on the other side of the school, students in the kitchen tackled another difficult task: making a perfect French macaron.

Selby Long, a Haines freshman and pastry chef extraordinaire, leads the class in this tricky recipe.

My name is Selby Long and I am in 9th grade. Well, I’m cooking right now. I have two kitchen blocks, and I just do it because I really like to cook. I really love to cook, and I just want to improve my skills and do things that I love. And I’m actually teaching this class that macaroons are sort of my specialty. And I thought it would be fun if I showed everyone in the course of the mini-week how to do them too. That’s kind of what we’re working on today.

The cooking class students had a different recipe every day to give them new skills and confidence in cooking. Other recipes included cinnamon rolls, fresh rolls, pizzas and cakes. Selby wasn’t the only instructor in the high school kitchen, other staff and community members helped share their culinary knowledge.

Ceramics is another class that students were able to choose. Six students worked on pottery wheels and improved their throwing ability. For one class period, they were blindfolded and told to only throw by muscle memory.

So, as advanced ceramics students, you should be able to do all of this by feel, not sight,” says Giselle Miller, the art teacher.

Left to right: Griffin Culbeck, Leo Wald, Willow Oakley and Matilda Rogers test their ceramic skills (Photo courtesy of Giselle Miller)

Junior student Matilda Rogers spent the majority of her mini-week on the wheel in the art room.

I like the mini-week because it gives students the opportunity to explore non-academic interests and what you might typically see in your school day. Yes, it just lets you explore your own interests and you can either try something you’ve never done before or dive deep into something that really interests you. And so I think it’s just a brilliant opportunity for the entire student body,” Rogers said.

In addition to the previously mentioned courses, students had several courses to choose from, including Wilderness First Aid, Backcountry Avalanche Training, and Aboriginal Youth Olympic Practice.

While students here in Haines may feel a bit left out of the Region V festivities, they instead gain valuable learning experiences and life lessons they can use in the future. The mini-week not only offers these students a break from normal classroom work, but also an equally entertaining week of learning with friends. It’s a win-win. Let’s Go Glacier Bears!

This story was reported by Haines senior Trygve Bakke (left) and freshmen Colin Aldassy (center) and Willow Bryant (right) in a “Mini-Week” radio journalism class. Edited and produced by Giselle Miller.

The students visited the KHNS radio station, learned how to interview, record, write scripts and develop stories for the air.

Students visit KHNS Radio, run by production assistant Jasper Posey (Photo courtesy of Giselle Miller)

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Construction to begin soon at historic Lilly Weston home : West Shore Chatter https://endgradeinflation.org/construction-to-begin-soon-at-historic-lilly-weston-home-west-shore-chatter/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 03:27:00 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/construction-to-begin-soon-at-historic-lilly-weston-home-west-shore-chatter/ WESTLAKE, Ohio – Westlake Historical Society sharing good news about Lilly Weston House. Construction will begin at the historic sandstone structure, which dates to around 1844. The house was built for Austin and Roxanna Lilly. They came to Dover Township, now Westlake, in 1832 from Ashfield, Massachusetts. The Lillys lived in the house until after […]]]>

WESTLAKE, Ohio – Westlake Historical Society sharing good news about Lilly Weston House.

Construction will begin at the historic sandstone structure, which dates to around 1844. The house was built for Austin and Roxanna Lilly. They came to Dover Township, now Westlake, in 1832 from Ashfield, Massachusetts. The Lillys lived in the house until after the Civil War – circa 1867.

WHS said the house was built from blocks of sandstone quarried nearby – possibly from a quarry near Porter Road. The blocks are about two feet thick. The front blocks were finely crafted and finished, while the rear and side ones were less elaborate. The basement is built of huge rectangular stone blocks. Thick, hewn beams support the roof of the structure.

A brick wing was added to the east side of the house around 1850.

After the Lillys left, the house had several other owners, including George Weston, James Beardsley and August Trudel. Eventually, Alice (Mrs. Dezso) Ladanyi, George Weston’s great-granddaughter, deeded the house to the town of Westlake for use as a museum.

Layne said construction to restore the home will begin in less than two weeks. WHS has been fundraising and seeking funding sources to fund the project for many years. “It’s now approved with funding,” Layne said.

WHS has also announced that its Community Coffee events will return to Panera, 21637 Detroit Road, Westlake. The first session will take place on March 19 from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. The community is invited to come and ask questions about the Lilly Weston restoration project and other events on the 2022 calendar.

Layne also announced that the 50th Antique Vintage and Craft Show will take place on June 5, a little earlier than usual. Anyone interested in participating in the event is invited to join the committee. Call 216-848-0680 for details and a meeting schedule.

Rotary Foundation Scholarships: the Rotary Lakewood/Rocky River Foundation offers high school students scholarships to any accredited post-high school educational institution. Five scholarships of $3,000 will be awarded to cover one year’s tuition.

Applicants must be members of the class of 2022 from any accredited high school; be a resident of the Lakewood or Rocky River School District; show a record of academic achievement in their high school career; have applied to a college, university, community or junior college, or specific trade or vocational school; and have no direct relationship with a current or honorary Rotarian.

Applications must be received by 3 p.m. on Monday, April 11. Prizes will be awarded on June 6.

The required information should be provided on the application form which can be downloaded at lakewoodrockyriverrotary.org.

Guidelines for submitting the application, as well as other criteria, are included.

Farewell: The town of Westlake had a retirement ceremony honoring Sgt. John Mauer on March 4, for 31 years with the Westlake Police Department.

Police Chief Kevin Bielozer praised Mauer, saying he had set a fine example of what solid police work should look like with his professionalism and attention to detail throughout his career. .

Mauer’s service often extended beyond Westlake through his work with the FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force. He has helped with cases throughout northeast Ohio.

Congratulations to Mauer and best wishes for a long, happy and healthy retirement.

Early Spring: Don’t forget to put your clock forward one hour before you go to bed on March 12. DST begins at 2 a.m. on March 13.

Registration for the summer bridge: The Lake Erie Bridge is accepting registrations for Summer Bridge Groups. There are openings in various bands playing at the following restaurants this summer: Arrabiata’s in Bay Village, Canary’s in North Olmsted, Cleveland Yachting Club in Rocky River, King Wah in Rocky River and Sangria in Westlake.

If you don’t have a partner yet, a “Find a Partner” group is available for players to connect with others. In the party, players play with a new partner each time they play.

Summer sessions are held twice in June, twice in July and once in August. Typically, play begins at 11 am with 20 hands and a break for lunch, which ranges from a buffet, off-menu or selection for a set fee ranging from $10 to $17.

For information, contact Janet Pavlich at 440-949-8512 or by email at janetpavlich@gmail.com.

Craft Fair: The 2022 Rocky River Spring Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on March 12 and from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on March 13 at Rocky River Memorial Hall, 21016 Hilliard Blvd., Rocky River. Admission is $3 and children under 12 are free. There will also be concessions on site. The salon accepts vendors. This is the 10th year of the show. Becki Silverstein, founder of the show, said cutting-edge arts and crafts shows are dedicated to supporting local craft businesses/entrepreneurs and giving back to the community. A portion of the proceeds from each Avant-Garde branded event is donated to a local charity. To date, the shows have raised nearly $60,000 for local nonprofits. This year, the spring show Rocky River Avant-Garde has partnered with the local non-profit association Children’s wigs. Part of the profits will be donated to the foundation to support its mission to help children look at themselves and live their lives. Wigs for Kids has been creating wigs for children with cancer for 40 years. To keep track of this year’s events and upcoming vendors, check out the Facebook page, Twitter accountand instagram. More information can also be found at avantgardeshows.com. Artisans from across Northeast Ohio will gather to display their work at the 100% Handmade Craftsmen and Artisans Showcase. This event will feature a variety of local vendors who specialize in creating unique finds ranging from textiles, wood crafts, bath and body products to jewelry and more.

Information, please: Readers are invited to share information about themselves, their families and friends, organizations, religious events, etc. of Bay Village, Rocky River and Westlake for the West Shore Chatter column, which I write as a freelancer. Awards, honors, milestone anniversaries or birthdays and other items are welcome. Submit information at least 10 days before the requested publication date to carolkovach@hotmail.com.

Learn more about the West Bank Sun.

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Ten principles for embracing productive conflict (opinion) https://endgradeinflation.org/ten-principles-for-embracing-productive-conflict-opinion/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 08:11:02 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/ten-principles-for-embracing-productive-conflict-opinion/ For over 20 years I have been teaching a college course on the science of well-being. When we talk about the psychology of courage, I start with just one question: Were the 9/11 hijackers brave? The conversation often gets heated. Some reflexive reactions emerge. Someone usually says something like “Absolutely not! They are cowards! This […]]]>

For over 20 years I have been teaching a college course on the science of well-being. When we talk about the psychology of courage, I start with just one question: Were the 9/11 hijackers brave?

The conversation often gets heated. Some reflexive reactions emerge. Someone usually says something like “Absolutely not! They are cowards! This year I had a student from the Middle East who took the risk of disagreeing with the rise of public sentiment in the classroom. She stressed the importance of gaining the perspective of terrorists, understanding their culture and belief system. In previous years, veterans enrolled in my class have explained that sometimes violence is necessary to protect your country.

Opinions about courage generate intense emotions. Conversations are difficult to moderate. It would be much easier if we just presented a PowerPoint slide with the common definition of courage. No conflicts. No improvised thinking. But we would do so at a price: we would have fewer opportunities for curiosity, intellectual humility and the exchange of points of view. We don’t want students to passively digest the definition of courage. We want them to think things through and be brave enough to share their thoughts, unvarnished and uncensored.

To understand the complexity of human behavior and society, we must accept difficult questions and respectfully consider alternative points of view. Worrying about whether you can ask questions and challenge the opinions of others is uneducated.

And we in higher education face many difficult questions and problems. There are racial issues. Studies show that teachers often label students who misbehave as troublemakers and discipline them more harshly if they are black than if they are white. For reasons beyond their control, black students are less likely to graduate from high school and enter and graduate from university compared to white students. Black instructors get a lot worst grades from anonymous students on the quality and credibility of education than white people.

There are social class issues. Students from lower socio-economic backgrounds lack cultural capital, insider knowledge of books they should have read, and social connections that allow entry into groups that offer greater opportunities. As such, their sense of incompetence tests their the energy to perform at high levels inside and outside the classroom.

Then there are the climate issues on campus. National surveys indicate an increase in the number of university students reluctant to share their opinions on controversial topics in the classroom. In an investigation run by the Heterodox Academy, three in five students said they had self-censored out of fear that “other students would criticize my opinions as offensive”, while one in three students feared that “the teacher would say that my opinions are wrong”. With a high level of liberal leanings among professors in traditional universities, some more conservative ideas seem to be, and often are, verboten. And while professors receive salaries to assess, teach and study complex societal issues, forms of censorship are common, including prohibiting them from testifying on the campus issue mask mandates and cancellation of conference appearances because, for example, they offer alternatives to existing race-based affirmative action policies.

Taboos at the Academy

The problems of the education system span the political spectrum. Given this wide range of issues, colleges and universities are experimenting with interventions — from anti-racism education to wellness initiatives to curtailing legacy, wealth-based, and athletic admissions. In fact, a few months ago a group of intellectuals announced the launch of a brand new university, the University of Austin, or UATX, supposedly to right some of those wrongs. They propose an experiment to produce an educational experience “fully committed to freedom of inquiry, freedom of conscience and civil discourse”.

The plan is to to be “fiercely independent”, both financially and politically – a university where controversial topics are open to reflection and evaluation of existing evidence. As colleges and universities grapple with a history of racial, class, and ideological discrimination, it helps to create an institution that adheres to such lofty commitments as exploring the nature of humanity, even if the results are uncomfortable.

Perhaps the biggest challenge to the University of Austin – or any educational experience – is the design of culture. How do we establish a culture that empowers and embraces minorities, whether defined by numbers, power, status, or demographics? How to protect dissent? How do you create a place where people can ask provocative questions without being overruled and others can respond with subsequent questions and concerns about the initial provocation?

What really determines whether freedom of inquiry exists in a university is how people react when the minority points out the dysfunctional beliefs and practices of the majority. When you create something from scratch like the University of Austin, you are no longer the alien raging against the machine. The institution becomes the machine. So you have to put in place protection mechanisms so that people can disagree with the institution. People are fallible, and so the institution you create will be too. Course corrections will be inevitable. Students, faculty and stakeholders must be empowered to initiate them.

A proposed charter of 10 university principles

As a long-time professor at George Mason University, I know of a number of issues with the current education system and have some personal thoughts on how to address them. I have developed a proposed charter for a university trying to do what UATX aspires to, consisting of 10 principles for higher education institutions interested in building academic, intellectual, and social communities. Principles are a set of rules or truths that stand the test of time. With clear principles, a university holds a beacon for making tough choices. Here are the ones I recommend.

  1. The principle of illusory danger. If you think of a question, you can ask it. The only dangerous question is the belief that dangerous questions exist.
  2. The principle of benevolent intention. Encourage others to talk by letting them know that you will work hard to respond with charity, curiosity, and the assumption of positive intent. When speaking, you should receive the same receptivity unless there is compelling evidence to suggest otherwise.
  3. The principle of sympathy. Reduce the impact of how much you like or dislike people when it comes to making judgments about the content of their posts and how you treat them. Know that sympathy is often unrelated to the legitimacy of ideas. We have to separate the message from the messenger.
  4. The principle of individual differences. Resist treating individuals as representatives of their groups. There is often more heterogeneity within groups than between groups.
  5. The principle of open-mindedness. Balance pressures for compliance with a willingness to explore alternative ideas and perspectives. Remember that being open and curious does not imply a commitment to change your point of view.
  6. The principle of wide diversity. Expand definitions of diversity to go beyond what is visible to include categories of class and socioeconomic status, adversity, neurodiversity, and individual differences in temperament and personality. Remember, there is no point in attracting diverse individuals unless you do the hard part of working with them, valuing and encouraging their uniqueness.
  7. The ad hominem principle. Resist the temptation to label people as simply “bad” or sexist, racist, homophobic, elitist, ideologue, snowflake or whatever. Instead, engage in the more nuanced task of battling against the quality of their ideas and solutions.
  8. The principle of independent thought. Be aware of the cognitive biases that afflict everyone, especially confirmation bias and motivated reasoning. Maintain the same standards of proof whether or not they agree with your original and preferred positions.
  9. The principle of behavioral evidence. Rely on the evidence as much as possible, even if it leads to answers that conflict with your assumptions and preferences.
  10. The principle of personal evolution. Each person must commit to learning and growing. It means being willing to let go of ideas that no longer work or that don’t survive empirical scrutiny.

We don’t know if the University of Austin experiment will adhere to the above principles. We can keep hope. Meanwhile, perhaps administrators at existing colleges and universities will read this list and conduct audits to determine how well they align their daily actions with these principles. Let’s produce educational environments that incubate future leaders who possess courage and flexibility, knowledge and creativity. The arc of human progress has always depended on those who make it.

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Bourne Public Schools Receives Capital Grant to Purchase Ambulance Simulator https://endgradeinflation.org/bourne-public-schools-receives-capital-grant-to-purchase-ambulance-simulator/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 21:33:14 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/bourne-public-schools-receives-capital-grant-to-purchase-ambulance-simulator/ For immediate release BOURNE — Superintendent Kerri Anne Quinlan-Zhou and Program Director Kelly Cook are pleased to announce that Bourne Public Schools has received a $75,000 Skills Capital Grant from the Baker-Polito Administration. . The funding will allow the school to purchase an ambulance simulator, medical beds and medical equipment. The space will also be […]]]>
For immediate release

BOURNE — Superintendent Kerri Anne Quinlan-Zhou and Program Director Kelly Cook are pleased to announce that Bourne Public Schools has received a $75,000 Skills Capital Grant from the Baker-Polito Administration. .

The funding will allow the school to purchase an ambulance simulator, medical beds and medical equipment. The space will also be offered to community partners to support certification programs such as EMT training, CNA training, and first aid/CPR certifications.

Skills Capital Grants are awarded by Governor Baker’s Office of Workforce Skills, which was established in 2015 to align education, economic development and workforce policies to strategize on how to meet employer demand for skilled workers in each region of the Commonwealth.

The grant, which was requested by Ann-Marie Strode, Career Schools Coordinator at Bourne High School, and Kimberly Iannucci, Senior Guidance Counselor, will help prepare students for a variety of medical and healthcare fields through first aid certification courses and other related courses.

“Having this equipment will open many doors for our students and give us the opportunity to expand our course offerings to provide students with real hands-on training experiences in a meaningful way,” Strode said.

An ambulance simulator will be a major part of BPS’ efforts to implement a healthcare pathway at Bourne High, part of the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s (DESE) Innovation Pathways initiative. . Innovation tracks are designed to give students lessons and experience in specific high-demand industries, and the school has already applied for an environmental and life sciences track and a business and in finance for the 2022-2023 school year. These “real-world” pathways offer great flexibility for students seeking hands-on experiences and high-level coursework that will prepare them for both college and a career.

The healthcare pathway would be the third such pathway at BHS and would give students access to practical, real-world training to prepare them for careers in medicine, nursing, emergency medical services, etc

Strode runs the school’s career readiness course and collects data on which courses students show interest in.

“There has never been a more important time to enter the healthcare field, and we are excited to continue to provide high quality education to students through the use of this ambulance simulator,” said said director Cook. “A lot of what we emphasize here at Bourne is preparing students for life after graduation and entering the world, whatever that might be like, and these pathways do just that. Being able to launch a health course would be a considerable asset for our school and we thank the Baker-Polito administration for this latest grant which will allow us to take another step towards its realization.

About Skills Capital Grants

Since 2015, 407 grants totaling over $105.5 million have been awarded to 207 different schools and educational institutions across the Commonwealth through the Skills Capital Grant scheme.

In the latest round of funding, grants totaling $3.3 million were awarded to 20 educational organizations across the Commonwealth to update equipment and increase the number of students enrolled in programs that provide vocational training. To date, more than $105.5 million in total funding has been provided to high schools, colleges and other educational organizations since the program‘s inception in 2015.

About two-thirds of the investments made with the grants are aimed directly at reducing skills gaps in high-priority industrial sectors, including health care, manufacturing, IT and skilled trades. A percentage of the funding, approximately 5%, was invested in multi-year strategic projects in the manufacturing, healthcare and energy training programs that are expected to have significant regional impact.

To learn more about the Massachusetts Skills Capital Grants program, click here.

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Why canceling the Fulbright program in Afghanistan matters | Opinions https://endgradeinflation.org/why-canceling-the-fulbright-program-in-afghanistan-matters-opinions/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 07:19:21 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/why-canceling-the-fulbright-program-in-afghanistan-matters-opinions/ Many have been puzzled by the Biden administration’s policy choices vis-a-vis Afghanistan since the disastrous U.S. withdrawal from the country last August. It is unclear whether these choices are intended to appease the domestic public or to collectively punish a people for the unsuccessful end of a long and costly war. Either way, they are […]]]>

Many have been puzzled by the Biden administration’s policy choices vis-a-vis Afghanistan since the disastrous U.S. withdrawal from the country last August. It is unclear whether these choices are intended to appease the domestic public or to collectively punish a people for the unsuccessful end of a long and costly war. Either way, they are causing immense suffering to Afghans who have already suffered enough.

Indeed, the list of recent US policy choices that have objectively been detrimental to the Afghan people is seemingly endless. After the withdrawal in August, for example, the United States failed to quickly evacuate and resettle thousands of Afghans who had helped its troops and suddenly found themselves under threat of reprisals. Many of these people are still in limbo in third countries or in hiding in Afghanistan some six months later. After the Taliban took control of Kabul, Washington also renewed sanctions and froze Afghan funds, leaving the country’s banking system in shambles. All of this has led to an unprecedented humanitarian crisis, leaving eight out of nine families in Afghanistan in need of food aid. A few months later, President Joe Biden signed an executive order dividing $7 billion in frozen Afghan funds held in US banks, allocating half for the benefit of the Afghan people, but keeping the other half available for eventual seized by victims of the September 11 attacks. .

And a few weeks ago, the United States added another inexplicably vengeful policy to this list: it canceled the Fulbright program for foreign students in Afghanistan for the 2022-23 academic year.

This may seem like a minor development in the grand scheme of things. But for dozens of young Afghan scholars, it marked the dashing of all their dreams and hopes for a better future.

Fulbright, the flagship U.S. educational exchange program with the stated goal of “building bridges between the United States and other countries,” offers Afghan graduate students the opportunity to earn a fully-funded master’s degree in the United States. United.

On January 28, the program‘s 140 Afghan semi-finalists – all of whom passed a rigorous review process based on academic excellence, leadership skills, work experience, English proficiency and strength of study/research goals to reach this level – received an email that may have changed their lives forever. It read: “Due to significant barriers that impede our ability to provide a safe exchange experience, the selection process for the Fulbright Foreign Student Program in Afghanistan for the 2022-23 academic year will not go from the front.”

Across the country, the semi-finalists, who had sacrificed so much and worked so hard to be considered for this life-changing opportunity, were devastated.

“I begged my relatives to pay for my TOEFL test [Test of English as a Foreign Language, passing of which is a prerequisite to admission into the Fulbright Program] and took it while Kandahar was in the midst of an intense war,” tweeted a semi-finalist named Sayed Abdul Rahim Afghan. The night before the test, I couldn’t sleep because of the constant sounds of gunfire and explosions. And that’s the answer we get after a year.

The cancellation has “ruined my life”, campaign semi-finalist Noor Mohammad told media in Paktika, a region devastated by war, drought and poverty for more than 40 years in south-east India. Afghanistan. “I had planned my whole career and my life around it and sacrificed everything else for it. I’m in shock now and I don’t know what to do.

Many others revealed that they had to borrow money or work as laborers to pay for language lessons. They explained that after hours of grueling manual labor, they studied for the TOEFL at night, by candlelight, with no electricity or internet access. They explained how they now feel hopeless, lost.

I was deeply saddened by these accounts because I know only too well how painful such a loss would be.

A few years ago, I too was a high school student in rural Afghanistan who dreamed of getting a Fulbright scholarship and studying in the United States. I lived in a village in Nangarhar, where I had no access to electricity, clean water, or even a chair to sit on while I studied. I waited early every morning on the side of a muddy road for a truck to pass so I could jump in the back to go to a language course in Jalalabad. It took years of hard work, many sacrifices, but in the end, I succeeded: I became a Fulbright Scholar.

The program allowed me to attend Oregon State University (OSU) and live in Corvallis, one of the most beautiful college towns in the United States.

Throughout the program, I had the opportunity to meet and exchange ideas with Americans from all walks of life – academics, professionals, my neighbors. I told them stories about Afghanistan, and they shared with me their experiences of American life.

I had the opportunity to meet Professor Francis Fukuyama, and to exchange emails with Professor Noam Chomsky. I had long friendly discussions over coffee with a pastor, a priest and a rabbi. I chaired the Muslim Student Association (MSA) for over a year at OSU and hosted iftars for Muslims during Ramadan. I participated in academic and cultural programs organized by Native American and Black American student clubs.

The Fulbright program has undoubtedly changed the trajectory of my life. It also taught me a lot about life and the importance of interpersonal relationships across borders. I have had the opportunity to see how Americans in urban centers and rural areas go about their lives knowing very little about Afghanistan and the Afghan people, despite the significant involvement of the United States in my country. I saw how common it is for them to assume that “all Afghans are terrorists”. But I’ve also seen how open they can be to learning once they meet an Afghan.

This is why the US State Department’s decision to cancel the Fulbright Fellowship program for Afghan scholars in 2022-23 is devastating and unacceptable.

This decision undoubtedly crushed 140 young Afghan university students, including 70 resilient girls, who had worked hard to reach the semi-finals. But the cancellation will not only hurt them.

This unfortunate decision will also harm the United States and its already badly tainted legacy in my country.

According to the State Department, approximately 960 Afghans have received Fulbright scholarships since 2003. This means that since the US invasion of Afghanistan, 960 bright young Afghans have had the opportunity to study in the United States, experience American culture, to teach Americans about their country. , and become “bridges” between the two nations.

After the catastrophic exit of the United States from Afghanistan, these cultural, academic and human ties are more important than ever.

The United States must now decide what legacy it wants to leave in Afghanistan after the end of its 20-year occupation: a legacy of collective punishment and abandonment, or a legacy of mutual respect and cooperation.

Since last August, the political choices of the Biden administration have consistently marked a preference for collective punishment. Largely thanks to the United States, my country is currently on the brink of starvation, its economy is strangled, its central bank reserves are frozen, and people have no access to their savings.

But that should not be the legacy of the United States in Afghanistan. It’s not too late to change course and do the right thing.

Reviving the Fulbright scholarship program for Afghans could be a small first step towards correcting recent US missteps in Afghanistan. This would not only show the semi-finalists that their hard work was not wasted, but would also signal to all Afghans that the United States is always ready to build bridges between the two countries.

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the editorial position of Al Jazeera.

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Bailey and Campo receive Rotary Hats Off Award | News https://endgradeinflation.org/bailey-and-campo-receive-rotary-hats-off-award-news/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/bailey-and-campo-receive-rotary-hats-off-award-news/ TEWKSBURY — On Thursday, February 17, The Rotary Club of Tewksbury honored Class of 2022 TMHS members Eówyn Bailey and Lauren Campo for receiving the February 2022 Hat’s Off Award. The Hat’s Off Award is a joint initiative of the Rotary Club of Tewksbury and Tewksbury Memorial High School to recognize students who have distinguished […]]]>

TEWKSBURY — On Thursday, February 17, The Rotary Club of Tewksbury honored Class of 2022 TMHS members Eówyn Bailey and Lauren Campo for receiving the February 2022 Hat’s Off Award.

The Hat’s Off Award is a joint initiative of the Rotary Club of Tewksbury and Tewksbury Memorial High School to recognize students who have distinguished themselves both academically and civically in the community.

Eówyn Bailey, daughter of Malinda and Brian Bailey, was nominated by TMHS faculty members Graca Dudley, Nancy O’Hare and Cathy Stacks for her kind and generous nature and for her joy in learning which led her to academic excellence.

Academically, Bailey earned regular spots on the TMHS Principal’s List and Honor Roll throughout her high school career.

Taking a stacked course schedule of four AP (Advanced Placement) courses, added to his completed AP course from junior year, is an impressive course load for his high school career.

A recipient of the Biliteracy Achievement Award in Spanish and Latin, Bailey also hopes to receive the Massachusetts State Seal of Biliteracy in Spanish and Latin by the end of this school year.

Bailey’s academic accomplishments have made her an active member of her TMHS community.

She is an active member of the National Honor Society, TMHS Yearbook Staff, TMHS International Club, Writing Club and Peer Mentoring Program.

Bailey’s leadership qualities shine through in her roles as vice president of the Junior Classical League and officer of Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD).

During her last four years on the TMHS campus, she also helped tutor other students.

Outside the walls of TMHS, community service is a top priority for Bailey.

Her fundraising work includes volunteering with organizations such as Toys for Tots, Doctors Without Borders and Souls for Shoes.

Bailey was also involved in making blankets for the mothers and children of Hart House and helped with the clean-up efforts at Tewksbury Hospital cemetery.

Somehow, Bailey also found time to work as a babysitter on a regular basis.

For her personal enjoyment, Bailey expanded her passion for music by pursuing piano lessons which she began taking at the age of five.

Lauren Campo, daughter of Sandra and Vincent Campo, was nominated by TMHS faculty member Donna Boudreau-Hill for her dedication, hard work, and strong desire to learn.

Campo’s hard work paid off, earning him an impressive 4.3 GPA for his senior year at TMHS.

Campo’s academic accomplishments include four AP (Advanced Placement) courses, a place on the principal’s list, and receiving the TMHS Gold Card.

She is also an active member of the National Honor Society and the Interact Club.

As driven as Campo is academically, she also remains physically challenged as a member of the TMHS dance team.

Outside the halls of TMHS, Campo remains just as active in serving her community. She has participated in Relay for Life (a fundraising event for the American Cancer Society) and Lazarus Hike for Hope.

Despite such a busy schedule, Campo has a job at the Merrimack Valley Pavilion Family Fun Center and was recently promoted to shift supervisor. She also takes care of the nannies of elementary age children to help them with virtual learning.

After graduation, the two Hat’s Off recipients plan to continue their journey on the path of education.

Bailey plans to go to college in the fall with a double major in classics with an emphasis on Latin and Spanish. Having already written numerous poems, short stories and the debut of two novels, Bailey hopes to be a part-time author while pursuing a career in teaching at the high school or college level.

Campo is still at the decision-making level of his college career, but plans to go to college and earn his bachelor’s degree.

Regardless of their future, these well-deserving Hat’s Off Award winners are headed in the right direction!

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Ford taps Project Alphabet co-founder as Michigan Central CEO https://endgradeinflation.org/ford-taps-project-alphabet-co-founder-as-michigan-central-ceo/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 16:46:15 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/ford-taps-project-alphabet-co-founder-as-michigan-central-ceo/ Ford Motor Co. announced a chief executive Monday to lead Michigan Central, the mobility district the Dearborn automaker is developing in Corktown, anchored by Michigan’s former Central Station. Joshua Sirefman, 54, co-founder and former president of New York-based Sidewalk Labs — Google’s parent company Alphabet Inc.’s smart city projects — was tapped for the role. […]]]>

Ford Motor Co. announced a chief executive Monday to lead Michigan Central, the mobility district the Dearborn automaker is developing in Corktown, anchored by Michigan’s former Central Station.

Joshua Sirefman, 54, co-founder and former president of New York-based Sidewalk Labs — Google’s parent company Alphabet Inc.’s smart city projects — was tapped for the role. Its main task: “to advance the neighborhood’s vision and execute a plan that leverages placemaking, cross-sector collaboration and real estate development to promote innovation and inclusion,” according to a press release.

In addition to leading district development, Sirefman will lead Michigan Central’s Innovation Services business, which includes overseeing the program established by the project’s “founding members” – so far, Ford and Google – and d other public-private partners, according to Ford. . Sirefman will be responsible for recruiting new talent to campus and coordinating governance and reporting.

Sirefman will also help oversee Michigan Central’s new philanthropic arm, the Michigan Central Foundation.

“Joshua is the ideal person to lead the development of Michigan Central,” said Mary Culler, chief development officer of Michigan Central, chief of staff to Ford executive chairman Bill Ford and chair of the Ford Fund, in a statement. “His experience in mobility, development planning and community engagement – ​​which was particularly important to us – will be essential in helping to guide the team and partners in the district on the path to meaningful innovation that really helps to create a more accessible future for all. »

Sirefman also served as Development Manager for Sidewalk Labs and, most recently, Senior Advisor. Sidewalk Labs announced in December that it would be integrated into Google after its founder and CEO stepped down for health reasons. The Urban Innovation Initiative’s flagship project was an effort to create a “smart neighborhood” in Toronto that did not come to fruition, according to media reports.

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Prior to co-founding Sidewalk Labs, Sirefman started development services company Sirefman Ventures. The company led Cornell University’s successful bid to attract a new applied science graduate program to New York, Ford noted in a press release. Sirefman also served on former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s economic development team and oversaw development in the United States for real estate management firm Brookfield Properties.

In a statement, Sirefman said he sees Michigan Central “and the work developed and piloted here living at the crossroads of physical, social and economic mobility. As an open platform welcoming all to break new frontiers of innovation on all three fronts, we have an exciting opportunity to be a world-leading place of impact – starting in Detroit communities and expanding outwards.

The district will operate as a wholly owned subsidiary – the new Michigan Central Innovation District LLC – of Ford. This entity will oversee operations and initiatives related to the 30-acre district.

Google was recently announced as a “founding member”, along with Ford, of Michigan Central. Although Ford is leading the redevelopment of the iconic former train station and surrounding area, the company emphasized that Michigan Central will not be a Ford campus, but a collaborative neighborhood where startups and established businesses will develop and test products and services from mobility.

Michigan Central leaders also recently announced a public-private partnership with the State of Michigan and the City of Detroit that will include additional financial support for the project and the creation of a Transportation Innovation Zone in the district where the city would speed up approvals to allow companies to pilot mobility technologies.

Google’s involvement will focus on workforce development for local high school students and job seekers. The California-based company will also provide cloud technology for Michigan Central’s mobility projects.

Sirefman is originally from New York but has some experience working in Detroit, according to a press release. He created and managed a program through the non-profit community redevelopment organization Islandview Village Development Corp. and co-designed a citywide industrial retention program as a member of the Detroit Economic Growth Corp.

Restoration of Michigan Central Station is expected to be completed next year. Overall, the nearly $1 billion development includes 1.2 million square feet of retail space.

Ford purchased the long-abandoned old station in 2018 and has since been working on a project that, in addition to redeveloping the station into offices, retail stores, event space and a hotel, includes construction of the neighborhood that will be primarily open to the public. . The adjacent Albert Kahn-designed Book Depot building and the 1,250-space Bagley Mobility Center are scheduled to open this summer.

Ford expects to have about 2,500 employees based at Michigan Central, with the rest of the employees on campus coming from other companies.

jgrzelewski@detroitnews.com

Twitter: @JGrzelewski

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Educational Briefings February 12-19 – The Newnan Times-Herald https://endgradeinflation.org/educational-briefings-february-12-19-the-newnan-times-herald/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 23:18:59 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/educational-briefings-february-12-19-the-newnan-times-herald/ Caylor named to Utah Dean’s List Newnan’s Natalie Caylor is among more than 9,600 students who have been named to the University of Utah’s Dean’s List for the fall 2021 semester. Caylor, a 2018 STAR student from Northgate High School, is pursuing studies in Health, Society and Politics and Sociology. Georgia State Announces Academic Honors […]]]>

Caylor named to Utah Dean’s List

Newnan’s Natalie Caylor is among more than 9,600 students who have been named to the University of Utah’s Dean’s List for the fall 2021 semester.

Caylor, a 2018 STAR student from Northgate High School, is pursuing studies in Health, Society and Politics and Sociology.

Georgia State Announces Academic Honors

The local residents have been named to Georgia State University’s Academic Honors Lists for the fall 2021 semester.

PRESIDENT’S LIST: Katherine Angelo of Newnan, Xavier Baruti of Newnan, Carlee Biggers of Senoia, Jeddie Biggers of Senoia, Conner Bogolin of Newnan, Lili Bourque of Sharpsburg, Mali Bourque of Sharpsburg, Kelsi Broderick of Newnan, Gabriel Butts of Palmetto, Donia Chiciu of Newnan, Ethan Clark of Sharpsburg, Rylee Cochran of Sharpsburg, Olivia Davis of Newnan, Kenneth Dudley of Newnan, Nicole Goncerzewicz of Newnan, Beau Gregory of Sharpsburg, Shannon Grimm of Sharpsburg, Taylor Henry of Sharpsburg, Kirsty Houston of Newnan, Xiaoyan Huang of Newnan, Ashfiq Islam of Newnan, Garrett Jones of Newnan, Rayhan Khot of Newnan, Beau Martin of Newnan, Rachael Mayhew of Newnan, Emily Miller of Senoia, Kendall Missal of Sharpsburg, Yujeong Na of Newnan, a-De’ja-Chanel Nelson-Porter of Newnan, Brianna Newton of Palmetto, Sarah Orozco of Newnan, Melissa Patino of Newnan, Joshua Perry of Newnan, Matthew Ralich of Newnan, Jessica Shenning of Newnan, Minjun Shim of Newnan, Emma Stacey of Newnan, Noor Tabbaa of Sharpsbu rg, Serena White of Newnan, Alani Wight of Newnan and Russell Zaring of Sharpsburg,

To be eligible, students must maintain a GPA of 4.0 while completing at least nine academic credit hours, with an institutional GPA of 2.0 or higher.

DEAN’S LIST: Moyosope Aigberua of Newnan, Alma Andrade of Palmetto, Jesse Awuah of Grantville, Makenzie Barnett of Moreland, Samantha Bartholomew of Newnan, Selma Bormann of Sharpsburg, Madelyn Bramer of Newnan, Asia Brown of Grantville, Mai Brown of Newnan, Jane Campbell of Newnan, Madison Cantrell of Newnan, Marifher Castaneda of Palmetto, Nicholas Clarke of Newnan, Stephanie Consuegra of Newnan, Justin Cook of Newnan, Isaiah Copeland of Newnan, Joshua Daisy of Newnan, Daniela Del Pilar of Sharpsburg, Sabrina Dragone of Newnan, Joelle Erwin of Sharpsburg, Juan Escobar of Newnan, Claire Fagan of Newnan, Kyle Ferguson of Palmetto, Diana Flores Valdez of Newnan, Jessica Foster of Sharpsburg, Amber Galloway of Senoia, Herniole Gavitse of Newnan, Arthikan Gengatharan of Newnan, Gisselle Gonzalez of Newnan , Valeska Gonzalez of Newnan, Viviana Gonzalez of Newnan, Hunter Hall of Sharpsburg, Ravene Harris of Newnan, Jeffrey Hoffman of Sharpsburg, Ishaa Hope of Palmetto, Orianne Hoyos of N ewna n, Matthew Keller of Newnan, Kirsten Key of Newnan, Alex Kim of Newnan, Evan Knight of Newnan, Gaeun Lee of Newnan, Saxon LeFebvre of Sharpsburg, Meredith Lodge of Sharpsburg, Kyle Loeber of Newnan, Noah Malik of Newnan, Kasey Miller from Newnan, Mehek Momin from Newnan, Emma Morris from Newnan, Fredrick Moses from Newnan, Elona Musliu from Newnan, Rachel Myrick from Palmetto, Huong Nguyen from Newnan, Kaitlin Novak from Newnan, Nidhi Patel from Newnan, Rishi Patel from Newnan, Tori Phillips of Newnan, Brooke Pittman of Senoia, Daniel Plonk of Newnan, Sebastian Rabanal of Newnan, Jordan Rineer of Senoia, Angie Rodriguez of Newnan, Christofer Sanchez Avila of Newnan, Jamie Sheets of Newnan, Tatyana Spivey of Sharpsburg, Geraldine Suarez of Palmetto, Jadin Newnan’s Suarez, Palmetto’s Unnisa Suarez, Newnan’s James Swafford, Palmetto’s Bryan Torres-Quiroz, Sharpsburg’s Eric Trinh, Newnan’s Savanna Turley, Senoia’s Nicole Watts and Senoia’s Michael Whitlock.

To be eligible, students must maintain a minimum 3.5 GPA while completing at least nine academic credit hours, with an institutional GPA of 2.0 or higher.

Georgia Southern Announces Academic Honors

Local residents have been named to Georgia Southern University‘s Academic Honors Lists for the Fall 2021 semester.

PRESIDENT’S LIST: Rachael Aldridge of Sharpsburg, Megan Blanchard of Senoia, Chaelyn Brewer of Senoia, Grady Cliche of Newnan, Zabrina Corrales of Senoia, Lindsay Eggen of Newnan, Connor Ellison of Newnan, Connor Fortner of Sharpsburg, Hope Futral of Moreland, Logan Gray of Newnan, Ansley Grier of Sharpsburg, Shandria Hill of Newnan, Sarah Hogg of Newnan, Emily Jimerson of Senoia, Faith Manuel of Newnan, Haley Mapp of Newnan, Ryan Mitchell of Newnan, Yenaira Napenas of Newnan, Carrie Sellers of Newnan, Brandon Shaw of Newnan, Taylor Smith of Newnan and Rachel Tripp of Sharpsburg.

To be eligible, students must maintain a 4.0 GPA while completing at least 12 academic credit hours.

DEAN’S LIST: Callie Bass of Newnan, Emily Bauman of Senoia, Adrianna Bodruk of Senoia, Brandon Burgess of Newnan, Skyler Carder of Senoia, Andrew Carson of Newnan, Joshua Colton of Sharpsburg, Kaitlyn Conrey of Senoia, Keva Elder of Sharpsburg, Jack Eskew of Sharpsburg, Jessica Garner of Sharpsburg, Catalina Gonzalez of Newnan, Byron Griffies of Newnan, Sydney Hall of Newnan, Andrew Harmon of Newnan, Ashley Hiller of Newnan, Emily Hogg of Newnan, Cameron Johnston of Newnan, Donovan Jones of Palmetto, Olivia Law of Newnan, Connor Marshall of Newnan, Virginia Mathis of Newnan, Caitlyn McCranie of Senoia, Emily McDowell of Senoia, Kyle Mcguire of Newnan, Jada Mcneil of Newnan, Alana Merry of Newnan, Jeremy Miller of Senoia, Ashlyn Millians of Newnan, Caitlin Nelms of Newnan, Skylar Patterson of Newnan, A’maya Pless of Newnan, Skylar Reifschneider of Sharpsburg, Sara Ridge of Senoia, William Sachs of Sharpsburg, Michael Shaw of Newnan, Skylar Sheha-Mcalee of Sharpsburg, Ashleigh Shriner of Senoia, Gill Ian Sneve of Senoia, Alexis Toles of Newnan, Daniel Troyano of Newnan, Larry Voyles of Senoia and Caroline White of Sharpsburg.

To be eligible, students must maintain a minimum 3.5 GPA while completing at least 12 academic credit hours.

Georgia State Announces Fall Graduates

Local residents were among more than 3,000 students graduating from Georgia State University in the fall 2021 semester.

Local graduates included:

Alma Andrade de Palmetto, Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance and Accounting

Aidan Coleman of Newnan, Bachelor of Arts in Applied Linguistics

Alison McCondichie de Newnan, Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies with a concentration in Media Entrepreneurship

Cordarious Reid of Senoia, Bachelor of Science in Public Policy with a Concentration in Public Management and Governance

Daniel Serna de Newnan, Bachelor of Arts in Film and Media

Elona Musliu from Newnan, Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing

Heather Bennett of Newnan, Associate of Science in Business Administration

Ishaa Hope of Palmetto, Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies with a Concentration in Law and Society

Jalen Alford from Newnan, a Master of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies with a concentration in Biomedical Enterprise

Jonathan Craig of Newnan, Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting

Jasmine Johnson of Newnan, Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences

Jacob Webb of Newnan, Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance

Kyle Ferguson of Palmetto, Bachelor of Science in Public Policy with a Concentration in Public Management and Governance

Liliana Chiciu de Newnan, Master of Laws with concentration in foreign bar

Logan Klein of Sharpsburg, Master of Science in Information Systems with a concentration in Cybersecurity

Newnan’s Lena Patel, Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice with a Concentration in Crime and Justice

Leeya Patel of Senoia, Bachelor of Science in Psychology

Matthew Siciliano-Salazar de Newnan, Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies with a concentration in Media Entrepreneurship

Mikayla Terrell de Newnan, Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies with a concentration in Media Entrepreneurship

Newnan’s Noah Malik, BSc in Chemistry with a Concentration in Pre-Medical Track

Olivia Davis de Newnan, Bachelor of Business Administration in Management Science

Raychele Couey de Newnan, Master of Arts in Communication with a concentration in Mass Communication

Shawn Canavan of Newnan, MSc in Biology with a concentration in Applied Environmental Microbiology

Sheryl Vasiliadis of Sharpsburg, Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting

Serena White de Newnan, Bachelor of Arts in Applied Linguistics

Vanessa Cornejo de Palmetto, Associate of Science with Studies in Criminal Justice

Yicel Reyes Miranda de Newnan, Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice with a Concentration in Crime and Justice

Zaira Diaz of Sharpsburg, Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance and Accounting

Whist named to Dean’s List at Tufts

Adelaide Whist of Palmetto has been named to Tufts University’s Dean’s List for the Fall 2021 semester.

To be eligible, students must maintain a minimum 3.4 GPA for the semester.

Coweta County School Board

At its February 8 meeting, the board:

• Approved the 2022 Sick Leave Bank Committee. Members are Jason Olvey, Chief Technology Officer; Sean Dye, principal of Jefferson Parkway Elementary; Toni Vinson, counselor at Welch Elementary School; Trish Barberio, teacher at Madras Middle School; Susie Bott, administrative assistant at the Werz Operations Center; Charlotte Hollins, registrar at East Coweta Middle School; and Allison Hurston, teacher at Newnan High School.

• Approved to enter into an agreement to sell 11,001 acres of land adjacent to Canongate Elementary School in Coweta County for $242,669.

• Approved a resolution to amend the 2023 state capital expenditure request for the reconstruction of Newnan High School. Updated plans include four business education labs to replace two computer labs and an engineering, drafting and design lab; an ROTC suite to replace a fourth art laboratory; six scientific laboratories instead of eight (11 already exist on campus).

• Approved renewal of agreement with West Georgia RESA to provide educational services for 2023 at a cost of $79,429.

• Approved the Canongate Elementary School PTO’s request to pay for materials and installation of playground equipment at the school.

• Approved Parrish Construction Group to provide construction management services at risk for the reconstruction, renovations and alterations of Newnan High School for a total amount of $2,579,000.

• Approved a request for the East Coweta High Schools Winterguard team to compete in the Winterguard International World Championship at the University of Dayton in Dayton, Ohio, April 6-10.

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Deloitte Canada commits $175,000 per year for three years to Indspire to invest in Indigenous education https://endgradeinflation.org/deloitte-canada-commits-175000-per-year-for-three-years-to-indspire-to-invest-in-indigenous-education/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/deloitte-canada-commits-175000-per-year-for-three-years-to-indspire-to-invest-in-indigenous-education/ Commitment demonstrates support for Indigenous-led solutions that build education capacity and increase economic prosperity TORONTO, February 15, 2022 /CNW/ – Today, Deloitte Canada announced its first multi-year sponsorship agreement with Indspire, committing $175,000 every year for three years to the only Indigenous-led education organization that offers scholarships, training and programs from coast to coast. Equitable […]]]>

Commitment demonstrates support for Indigenous-led solutions that build education capacity and increase economic prosperity

TORONTO, February 15, 2022 /CNW/ – Today, Deloitte Canada announced its first multi-year sponsorship agreement with Indspire, committing $175,000 every year for three years to the only Indigenous-led education organization that offers scholarships, training and programs from coast to coast.

Equitable access to educational opportunities, training and jobs is considered the most effective way to ensure the social and economic prosperity of Indigenous peoples. Indspire’s vision is that within a generation, every Indigenous student will graduate from high school and have the opportunity to pursue post-secondary education, breaking the cycle of unemployment, social marginalization and poverty experienced by a disproportionate number of First Nations, Inuit and Métis. today’s youth.

“We are pleased to work with Deloitte as they continue to take a leadership role in the enterprise space. Canada toward reconciliation,” said Dr. Mike DeGagné, President and CEO of Indspire. “Their support will have a significant impact on Indigenous students and communities by allowing us to build educational capacity, help strengthen the identity of Indigenous youth and, in the long term, increase economic sustainability and prosperity” .

The sponsorship supports the commitments made by Deloitte Canada as part of its reconciliation action plan. In line with the Truth and Reconciliation Committee’s Call to Action #92, Deloitte places a strong emphasis on building respectful and meaningful relationships with Indigenous communities, investing in education and training, and striving to become a trusted partner and employer for businesses and professionals.

“We are strongly committed to investing in the education of Indigenous youth and creating a talent pipeline for all Canadian organizations,” said Antoine Viel, CEO, Deloitte Canada. “We believe that the full participation of Aboriginal people in all aspects of our economy is key to a resilient and prosperous society. Canada and we see education and sponsorship as the path to achieving that goal.”

Launching the Brighter Futures Fellowship Program in 2017, Deloitte has been privileged to participate in several youth events and gatherings. In 2020 and 2021, Deloitte was proud to sponsor the Indspire Awards. Building deeper and more dynamic connections with students that include mutual learning experiences and mentorships is a priority for the firm. From a cash and cents perspective, Deloitte continues to support the Youth Soaring Gathering, annual Indspire Awards and scholarships for First Nations, Inuit and Métis students across Canada to help them complete their post-secondary education.

The next scholarship application deadline is August 1, 2022with additional annual submission dates on November 1, 2022and February 1, 2023 (visit indspire.ca for more information).

To learn more about Deloitte’s Reconciliation Action Plan, including how to develop and implement your own, please visit: https://www2.deloitte.com/ca/en/pages/ public-sector/articles/indigenous-impact-report.html.

About Indspire
Indspire is a national Indigenous charity that invests in First Nations, Inuit and Métis education for the long-term benefit of these people, their families and communities, and Canada. With the support of its funding partners, Indspire offers financial scholarships, offers programs and shares resources so that First Nations, Inuit and Métis students reach their full potential. In 2019-20, Indspire provided over $17.8 million through 5,553 scholarships to First Nations, Inuit and Métis students across Canada.

About Deloitte
Deloitte provides audit and assurance, advisory, financial advisory, risk advisory, tax and related services to public and private clients spanning multiple sectors. Deloitte serves four of the five Fortune Global 500® companies through a connected global network of member firms in more than 150 countries and territories, bringing world-class capabilities, knowledge and services to solve the most complex business challenges client. Deloitte LLP, a Ontario limited liability company, is the Canadian member firm of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited. Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, a UK private company limited by guarantee, and its network of member firms, each of which is a legally separate and independent entity. Please see www.deloitte.com/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited and its member firms.

Our global purpose has an impact that matters. At Deloitte Canada, this means building a better future by accelerating and expanding access to knowledge. We believe we can achieve this goal by living our shared values ​​to lead the way, serve with integrity, care for each other, foster inclusion, and collaborate for measurable impact.

To learn more about Deloitte’s more than 330,000 professionals, more than 11,000 of whom are part of the Canadian firm, please connect with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, instagram, or facebook.

SOURCEDeloitte & Touche

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View original content: http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/February2022/15/c5712.html

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Kambeseles wins Greek National Junior Championship https://endgradeinflation.org/kambeseles-wins-greek-national-junior-championship/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 19:39:26 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/kambeseles-wins-greek-national-junior-championship/ History links The last weekend of January saw most of the UNC fencing team enjoying a rare weekend and preparing for the pending Northwestern Duals. But not in second year Jack Kambeselewho was 5,000 miles from the campus in Athens, Greece, was crowned Junior Greek National Champion in men’s epee. Kambeseles has […]]]>

The last weekend of January saw most of the UNC fencing team enjoying a rare weekend and preparing for the pending Northwestern Duals. But not in second year Jack Kambeselewho was 5,000 miles from the campus in Athens, Greece, was crowned Junior Greek National Champion in men’s epee.

Kambeseles has been fencing for as long as he can remember. As a child, Jack would duel at home with his twin brother, Peter, with fake swords. Their parents decided to turn their playful antics into something productive and enroll them in fencing lessons. The Kambeseles twins have become great fencers. Peter, who is also a right-handed sword fighter, closes for Penn State‘s third-place finish and won the Greek Junior Nationals in 2019. He was a semifinalist this year, missing a match to face his brother in the finals. .

“We’re twins, so we’re basically like mirror images as right-handed swordsmen,” Kambeseles said.

Traveling to Athens this year, Kambeseles had to battle jet lag and prepare for a long weekend of fighting. Kambeseles has played 11 fights, the first six in pool and the last five in a home win or knockout tournament. Kambeseles was able to capitalize on his physique and stamina, winning the title fight, 15-6. Kambeseles attributes his physical strength to the level of training at UNC.

“I was able to take the UNC approach to fencing, with all the lifting and physical training, and incorporate that into my fencing in Greece,” Kambeseles said.

Kambeseles has had a busy three weeks. The weekend before heading to Greece, Kambeleses competed for UNC at the Philadelphia Invitational, and the weekend after his European excursion, he was back with the Tar Heels at the Northwestern Winter Duals.

While fatigue would catch up with most sophomores competing at a high level around the world, Kambeseles is no stranger to travel dating back to his pre-college days.

“Fencing in high school prepared me for all of these trips. I used to travel out of state and country almost every weekend, so eventually I started traveling to a science “said Kambeseles.

The Greek Junior National Championship in Kambeseles qualifies him to represent Greece at the European Junior Championships in Serbia and the Junior World Championship in Dubai this summer. Kambeseles will miss the European Championships for the ACC Championships at the end of February but is eager to travel to Dubai.

Kambeseles and the Tar Heels will return to Durham this weekend for the Duke Duals. Kambeseles will face rivals ACC Duke, as well as twin brother Peter and Penn State.


The two-day event in Durham is available to watch live on ESPN plus or follow on Twitter for live game updates.

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