National University – End Grade Inflation http://endgradeinflation.org/ Wed, 25 May 2022 20:47:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://endgradeinflation.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png National University – End Grade Inflation http://endgradeinflation.org/ 32 32 Lady Vols Track & Field Great Jane Haist has passed away https://endgradeinflation.org/lady-vols-track-field-great-jane-haist-has-passed-away/ Wed, 25 May 2022 20:47:37 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/lady-vols-track-field-great-jane-haist-has-passed-away/ Tennessee track and field great Jane Haist died Saturday, May 21 near her hometown of St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada. A 1976 Olympian and 2012 inductee into the Tennessee Athletics Hall of Fame, Haist was a member of the Lady Vols track and field program from 1977 to 1979 and was a two-time All-American. She won […]]]>
Tennessee track and field great Jane Haist died Saturday, May 21 near her hometown of St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada.

A 1976 Olympian and 2012 inductee into the Tennessee Athletics Hall of Fame, Haist was a member of the Lady Vols track and field program from 1977 to 1979 and was a two-time All-American.

She won an AIAW Individual National Discus Championship in 1977 with a 188-5 throw in Los Angeles. Haist also placed fourth in the shot put (47-10) at the same meet, while the Lady Vols finished fourth in the team standings.

Prior to this 1977 AIAW Championship competition, distance runner Terry Hull was the only Lady Vol to have won a national title (in any sport).

At the 1978 AIAW Championships, held in Knoxville, Haist finished second in discus (176-3.5).

Haist still holds the Tennessee program record for a women’s discus throw with a mark of 198-8 set at Tom Black Track on May 7, 1977.

She represented Canada as a discus thrower at the 1976 Montreal Olympics. Haist’s international competitive career has taken her to events all over the world, such as the 1974 Commonwealth Games in New Zealand. and the 1975 Pan American Games in Mexico City.

An online obituary and virtual guestbook are available HERE.

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Pfizer’s three-dose vaccine elicits strong reaction in youngest children https://endgradeinflation.org/pfizers-three-dose-vaccine-elicits-strong-reaction-in-youngest-children/ Mon, 23 May 2022 23:10:41 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/pfizers-three-dose-vaccine-elicits-strong-reaction-in-youngest-children/ MONDAY, May 23, 2022 (HealthDay News) — Pfizer/BioNTech says a three-dose regimen of its COVID-19 vaccine appears to elicit a strong immune response in the youngest children, those 6 months to 5 years old. This is the only age group not yet approved for vaccination against COVID-19 by the United States Food and Drug Administration. […]]]>

MONDAY, May 23, 2022 (HealthDay News) — Pfizer/BioNTech says a three-dose regimen of its COVID-19 vaccine appears to elicit a strong immune response in the youngest children, those 6 months to 5 years old.

This is the only age group not yet approved for vaccination against COVID-19 by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Pfizer said it plans to submit its new data to the agency this week.

The Phase 2/3 trial involved nearly 1,700 children who received a child-sized third dose of the vaccine at a time when the omicron variant was dominant. Tests carried out a month later showed an antibody response similar to that seen in 16- to 25-year-olds who received two doses of the vaccine.

Midway through the trial, the third dose gave young children 80% protection against asymptomatic COVID-19. The researchers identified 10 symptomatic cases of COVID-19 occurring at least seven days after the third dose. But the Pfizer team stressed that their analysis cannot be completed until at least 21 symptomatic cases occur in the vaccinated group and are then compared to the number of symptomatic cases in the unvaccinated group.

Vaccine doses have been adjusted downward for these smaller children – three 3mcg doses for those aged 6 months to 5 years. This is compared to two doses of 10 mcg for children ages 5 to 12 and two doses of 30 mcg for people 12 and older. Children in the youngest age group receive the first two doses three weeks apart and a third dose two months later. There do not appear to be any safety issues with the vaccine, which was well tolerated by children.

More information

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More than 1,600 Purdue University Global graduates attend launch ceremonies in Indianapolis https://endgradeinflation.org/more-than-1600-purdue-university-global-graduates-attend-launch-ceremonies-in-indianapolis/ Sat, 21 May 2022 23:08:15 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/more-than-1600-purdue-university-global-graduates-attend-launch-ceremonies-in-indianapolis/ INDIANAPOLIS — Some 1,630 Purdue University Global graduates participated in in-person and virtual launch ceremonies Saturday, May 21 at the Murat Theater at the Old National Center. IIn his address to the Class of 2022, speaker Derrick Howell-McQueen emphasized that the beginning means a beginning rather than an end. “If you look within and perceive […]]]>

INDIANAPOLIS — Some 1,630 Purdue University Global graduates participated in in-person and virtual launch ceremonies Saturday, May 21 at the Murat Theater at the Old National Center.

IIn his address to the Class of 2022, speaker Derrick Howell-McQueen emphasized that the beginning means a beginning rather than an end.

“If you look within and perceive today as the day you graduated, that prospect would imply that this is the end of the road for you,” said Howell-McQueen, born-and-bred financial coach and licensed minister. in Indianapolis, who graduated with a master’s degree in business administration from Purdue University Global in 2021. when I achieved something great; yes, this is an opportunity for me to celebrate with my loved ones, with my family and all those who have gone through this obstacle course with me, but I cannot afford to be stuck in this moment.

Derrick Howell-McQueen, an Indianapolis native who earned his MBA from Purdue University Global in 2021, delivered the keynote address at the Purdue University Global Opening Ceremonies on Saturday, May 21 in his hometown. (Photo Purdue University/John Underwood) Download image

“It is our vision that fuels us so that we can continue to travel and move forward with our lives. This is very important to realize and to understand conceptually because everything that is no longer advancing, everything that is no longer advancing, is finally in the process of no longer existing.

“I charge you never to stop imagining. Never stop growing. …I charge you to celebrate today’s accomplishment while simultaneously writing a new vision for tomorrow. Use today as future proof that you can persevere through anything.

Saturday marked the 13th launch for Purdue University Global since its inception in 2018 and the third in Indianapolis.

Two in-person and one virtual ceremonies took place during the day. Degrees have been awarded by the schools of aviation, commerce and information technology, Education, General Education, Health Sciences, Nursing, Social and Behavioral Sciences and Concord Law School. There was 738 bachelor’s degrees, 579 masters degrees, 177 associate degrees, 83 certificates and 16 postgraduate certificates, and 37 doctorates (23 Doctor of Nursing Practice, 12 Executive Juris Doctor and two Juris Doctor).

Purdue University Global has awarded its first two Bachelor of Science degrees in professional flight — to Rafael Madrid of Orlando, Fla., and Aydin Yaman of Chicago, a graduate summa cum laude — a program launched in 2019.

Frank Dooley
Chancellor Frank Dooley congratulated Purdue University Global graduates from all 50 states and around the world Saturday, May 21, in Indianapolis. (Photo Purdue University/John Underwood) Download image

Graduates reside in all 50 states – including 281 residents of Indiana and 46 of Indianapolis – plus Washington, D.C. and the U.S. Virgin Islands, as well as Bermuda, Brazil, Canada, China, Japan and Saint Kitts and Nevis. Forty-three employees from Purdue West Lafayette, Purdue Fort Wayne, Purdue Northwest and Purdue University Global are among those who have earned a Purdue University Global degree or certificate through the Purdue University Global educational benefit, bringing the total to more than 500 since the inception of the program.

Chancellor Frank Dooley addressed the graduates – 885 of them in person and 745 virtually.

“Whether you are here in Indianapolis or participating virtually, we are grateful to provide a ceremony that brings us all together, wherever we are in the world,” Dooley said. “I love that we can stay close through this institution as we recognize your accomplishments today.”

Dooley noted that more than 9,000 Purdue University Global students are affiliated with the military, including nearly 5,100 active duty, National Guard and Reserve members serving around the world. Nearly 50% are the first members of their family to attend university and about 60% are caring for a child or other dependant.

“What you all have done is so remarkable,” Dooley said. “You have completed your studies while dealing with whatever life throws at you, including a pandemic. It takes a lot of hard work and dedication to get where you are today, and you should be proud.

Two Purdue University Global graduates performed the national anthem ahead of their respective in-person ceremonies: Colleen Sheesefrom Downs, Illinois, a U.S. Army veteran who earned a Master of Science in Nursing, and Leighton Johnson, of Collierville, Tennessee, a U.S. Navy veteran who earned a master’s degree in health care administration. Johnson previously earned a magna cum laude bachelor’s degree in healthcare administration from Purdue University Global in 2020 and sang the national anthem at the December 2020 virtual ceremony.

In the days leading up to the start, Purdue University Global hosted various virtual celebration events, including a photo booth, toast, graduation board and social media activities.

More than 10,000 Purdue University Global students graduated last year.

Purdue University’s next global launch is scheduled for August 13 at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C.

About Purdue Global University

Purdue University Global offers personalized online education tailored to the unique needs of adults who have work or life experience beyond the classroom, enabling them to develop essential academic and career skills with the support and flexibility you need. they need to achieve their career goals. It offers students personalized paths to an associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral degree, based on their work experience, desired pace, military service, prior college credits, and other considerations – no matter where they are in their life journey. Purdue University Global is a public, nonprofit university accredited by the Higher Learning Commission. It is affiliated with the flagship institution of Purdue University, a top-tier public research university located in West Lafayette, Indiana. Purdue University also operates regional campuses in Fort Wayne and northwest Indiana, as well as science, engineering, and technology students at the Indiana University campus at the University Purdue of Indianapolis (IUPUI). For more information, visit purdueglobal.edu.

Writer/media contact: Tom Schott, tschott@purdue.edu

Sources: Frank Dooley

beth smith

Derrick Howell McQueen

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How Clive Palmer’s United Australia Party could impact the May 21 election https://endgradeinflation.org/how-clive-palmers-united-australia-party-could-impact-the-may-21-election/ Fri, 20 May 2022 06:53:17 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/how-clive-palmers-united-australia-party-could-impact-the-may-21-election/ Placeholder while loading article actions Clive Palmer is an Australian mining magnate with big ambitions. He once talked about cloning a dinosaur from DNA to build a real “Jurassic Park” and vowed to rebuild the Titanic from scratch. (He opted for robotic dinosaurs for his Palmersaurus theme park, which later flopped. And a decade after […]]]>
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Clive Palmer is an Australian mining magnate with big ambitions. He once talked about cloning a dinosaur from DNA to build a real “Jurassic Park” and vowed to rebuild the Titanic from scratch. (He opted for robotic dinosaurs for his Palmersaurus theme park, which later flopped. And a decade after he announced it, his replica ocean liner has yet to hit the water.)

In 2013 Palmer made his first major foray into national politics, including a brief stint in the balance of power in the Australian Senate. He spent millions campaigning in the previous federal election in 2019, but his party failed to win a single seat. His brash political style and populist rhetoric have drawn comparisons to former US President Donald Trump – and now he’s back, promising to ‘make Australia great again’.

While the odds of Palmer’s United Australia Party (UAP) winning even a single seat in Saturday’s federal election are slim, he has spent big in some tight races. One of UAP’s populist campaign videos on YouTube has been viewed nearly 25 million times, in a country of just under 26 million people.

Its biggest impact could be an election spoiler: Palmer recommended voters rank the ruling centre-right Liberal-National coalition against the centre-left Labor opposition in several key races, a decision that improves the odds return to power of Prime Minister Scott Morrison. .

Palmer, 68, became a billionaire through mining interests in iron ore, coal and nickel. In March, the Australian newspaper estimated his fortune at around $13 billion, thanks to a boom in mining royalties, although Forbes values ​​his empire at $2 billion.

The Queensland-based tycoon is no stranger to controversy. He sued the state of Western Australia for closing borders during the pandemic. (He lost.) Palmer has also spoken out against coronavirus vaccines and is unvaccinated. (The country uses internationally approved vaccines, including those made by Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and Oxford-AstraZeneca.)

Palmer has become increasingly populist in recent years, drawing inspiration from pro-Brexit lawmakers in Britain and Republicans in the United States, including Trump, said Glenn Kefford, a policy expert at the University of Queensland.

At times, however, his ideology is harder to pin down: In 2013, Palmer ran on a platform to bring in more refugees, just as the coalition and Labor parties were cracking down on asylum seekers and arriving refugees. by the sea.

“He’s an enigma in many ways. The actions he takes don’t always seem thoughtful or strategic. Sometimes they seem to be reactionary, spontaneous and emotional,” Kefford said.

What is Palmer’s United Australia Party platform?

Populist messaging is a key part of UAP’s strategy. Earlier in the pandemic, party members joined anti-lockdown movements across the country and railed against government-imposed vaccination mandates and passports.

In April, Palmer said only the UAP “could save Australia from the economic catastrophe imposed by the Liberal and Labor governments” – referring to the deficits racked up by ruling administrations respectively during the coronavirus pandemic and the 2008 financial crisis.

Recently, on Sydney Airport Road, a giant billboard emblazoned with the party’s bright yellow signature read, “SAVE YOUR HOME. Maximum mortgage rate at 3% per year. Vote 1 United Australia Party. UAP promises to cap mortgage interest rates at 3% for the next five years; in reality, benchmark rates are set by the country’s Independent Reserve Bank, which recently hiked interest rates amid the election campaign.

UAP leader Craig Kelly on Monday defended campaign posters suggesting he could be the next Prime Minister, telling Sky News Australia: ‘We are fighting; it is not a two-horse race. (Some analysts don’t even wait for it to win his own seat.)

In Australia’s calm climate election, independents could make noise

What does Clive Palmer think of women?

Palmer fielded a diverse mix of candidates in 2013, including many female candidates. He said Canberra needs to be more gender inclusive and that “Australia deserves to have the sage advice of all its people, not just some”.

But Jill Sheppard, a policy expert at the Australian National University, said Palmer did not have a feminist agenda. “For a lot of Australian voters, Clive Palmer is a quintessential businessman. He’s very masculine,” she said.

Its approach to politics is largely transactional, said Kefford of the University of Queensland, who has interviewed many former UAP candidates for a research project.

Prime Minister Morrison’s handling of complaints of sexual harassment and abuse was in the spotlight during the campaign.

How could Palmer and the UAP affect the Australian election?

Palmer’s party is fielding candidates for every upper and lower house seat. And though his candidates weren’t expected to win, Palmer played spoiler, attacking the policies of the major parties and presenting the UAP as the only viable alternative.

“The whole political class has turned against the people. We know we can never trust the Liberals, Labour, Greens or Nationals again,” Palmer said in December.

In 2019, Palmer helped spread baseless claims on social media that Labor was planning to introduce a “death tax” or inheritance tax, if elected. The misinformation hurt the opposition party’s standing with voters and was a factor as it ultimately lost an election it was widely expected to win.

Still, some experts expect Palmer’s impact to be limited in a robust democracy where voters generally don’t stray too far from the political center.

“Money doesn’t get you very far in Australian politics,” said Sheppard of the Australian National University.

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Ex-San Diegan says USD filmed him 24/7 in every room of his WA statehouse https://endgradeinflation.org/ex-san-diegan-says-usd-filmed-him-24-7-in-every-room-of-his-wa-statehouse/ Wed, 18 May 2022 01:54:37 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/ex-san-diegan-says-usd-filmed-him-24-7-in-every-room-of-his-wa-statehouse/ In March, Nick Ratekin appeared in San Diego Superior Court virtually from his home in Washington state. Photo by Ken Stone Last November, former San Diegan Nick Ratekin filed a report with the Clark County Sheriff’s Department in Washington state claiming he was being taped 24/7 at his home – the video and the audio […]]]>
Nick Ratekin used Microsoft Team software to appear in San Diego court from Washington state.
In March, Nick Ratekin appeared in San Diego Superior Court virtually from his home in Washington state. Photo by Ken Stone

Last November, former San Diegan Nick Ratekin filed a report with the Clark County Sheriff’s Department in Washington state claiming he was being taped 24/7 at his home – the video and the audio being “leaked” on social media.

Recent legal documents selected by Nick Ratekin (PDF)

“These recordings include my bedroom, bathroom, living room, kitchen, family room, and home office,” wrote Ratekin, who is suing the University of San Diego for breach of contract after being fired from his job. Masters of Education program and kicked out of student teaching jobs.

He said the recordings ranged from “everyday activities within the confines of my home, such as family conversations, to all telephone conversations, emails and other private communications”.

The Vancouver Sheriff’s Office has assigned Deputy Greg Marek to investigate.

A day after Ratekin filed his report, Marek wrote his own – noting that Ratekin accused the USD of what he called “persistent surveillance”.

But the 27-year-old Brush Prairie, Wash., resident was “unable to explain why or provide any other information to determine if a crime is occurring, to prove that these acts are occurring or if any evidence is there,” Marek wrote. Nov. 8, according to records obtained by The Times of San Diego.

Ratekin’s accusations didn’t stop there.

According to court records, he says the USD is circulating a “defamatory record”, part of a “chain of harassment” that prevents him from getting a job in education.

The former UC San Diego water polo star and title-winning coach also says his former lawyer, through San Diego Law Groups, overcharged him “more than $34,000” – intended to “cripple him financially “.

Additionally, Ratekin issued dozens of civil subpoenas. Only on February 11, he requested information from META (Facebook) CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Apple CEO Tim Cook, and the CEOs of Twitter, Snapchat and YouTube.

Also, Tony Thurmond, the California Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Two weeks later, after filing a FOIA request, he issued a civil subpoena to Nathan Richmond of the US Department of Transportation – whom he misnamed the Secretary of Transportation. (That’s Pete Buttigieg. Richmond is the deputy assistant inspector general.)

The DOT subpoena was for “widespread surveillance, social media harassment, and technological interference in the ‘drone surveillance’ of plaintiff Nicholas Christian Ratekin.”

(The Department of Transportation’s Office of the Inspector General in mid-February responded to his FOIA requests, saying he had “no records responding to your request,” but suggesting he write to Federal Aviation. Administration” for drone registrations.)

And on March 10, Ratekin — still acting as his own attorney — issued a subpoena to AT&T CEO John T. Stankey regarding “text messages, iMessages, phone calls, app data (Snapchat), cellular data or any other form of digital communication from Ratekin”. the data stored, kept or managed by AT&T is published on social networks, in particular Facebook (META), with the aim of humiliating and defaming it publicly”.

All of those claims were heard March 14 before Judge Eddie Sturgeon in San Diego Superior Court, where the USD won its motion to restrain Ratekin from issuing incessant subpoenas.

“The Court advises counsel and plaintiff that it will not permit any further discovery,” Sturgeon wrote. “Any future claims will be made in Court by ex-parte.”

Ratekin accepts Sturgeon’s offer.

On Thursday, the self-proclaimed Donald Trump fan will ask Sturgeon for clarification on the restraining orders.

He wants Sturgeon to define the “scope” and “parameters” of his civil subpoenas. Ratekin is aiming to stop the USD from sending the “defamatory dossier” to Concordia University in Irvine, a private Lutheran school where he says he was admitted to pursue a master’s degree in coaching and exercise science.

In court filings, Ratelin says he faced harassment from National University over sending his USD student records to NU ‘in violation’ of his life rights private of FERPA students.

(“A FERPA complaint was filed with the United States Department of Education in response to said violation circa January 2022 with a report finalized pending completion of the investigation,” Ratekin wrote.)

Despite his excellent academic record, he says, he struggled to find a job through the EdJoin platform. He sought positions in a dozen counties, including San Diego.

He blames “a pervasive, relentless, 24/7 ‘character defamation’ social media campaign launched by Scripps Ranch High School in the San Diego Unified School District during the team seasons of Scripps Ranch boys and girls water polo starting May 19, 2021.

“Plaintiff Nicholas Christian Ratekin believes that the San Diego Unified School District seeks to continue this social media character defamation campaign until the statute of limitations expires,” it wrote.

Ratekin says he is seeking a change of venue for his November 4, 2022 trial.

He wants him moved to Riverside County” given the defamation and its hyper-focus in the Greater San Diego area due to the “viral nature” of defaming Facebook as a means of retaliation and intimidation against the plaintiff intended to improperly influence or “poison” potential jury pools.

Ratekin did not respond to requests from The Times of San Diego for examples of defamatory social media.

At the same hearing on Thursday, Ratekin also sought court approval for a series of deposition requests.

He wants to interview SHU and National University officials as well as the head of public schools Thurmond.

Why Thurmond?

He says he wants to know why the California Department of Education closed Thrive Charter School in June 2019 after Ratekin taught there.

“Plaintiff Nicholas Christian Ratekin understands from teaching at Thrive that the school has failed the Basic Learning Outcomes, California State Graduation Rate Criteria, and California State Literacy Criteria. the State of California,” Ratekin wrote in a May 9 filing.

“This disregard for basic California state education standards has occurred simultaneously with the indoctrination of students with ‘left-wing’ ideology such as ‘protests’ and reading materials such as “Malcom X” which contained both expletive and racist slurs.”

Ratekin concluded, “These reading materials effectively attacked Christianity as a ‘white devil’ ideology that goes against a Catholic university such as the University of San Diego. …Ratekin identifies as a Christian (Protestant) and expects the University of San Diego to share some memory [sic] of these values.







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Commodity markets: evolution, challenges and policies https://endgradeinflation.org/commodity-markets-evolution-challenges-and-policies/ Mon, 16 May 2022 03:32:24 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/commodity-markets-evolution-challenges-and-policies/ Commodity markets are an integral part of the global economy. Understanding what drives the development of these markets is essential to designing policy frameworks that facilitate the economic goals of sustainable growth, inflation stability, poverty reduction, food security, and climate change mitigation. This study is the first comprehensive analysis examining the evolution of markets and […]]]>

Commodity markets are an integral part of the global economy. Understanding what drives the development of these markets is essential to designing policy frameworks that facilitate the economic goals of sustainable growth, inflation stability, poverty reduction, food security, and climate change mitigation. This study is the first comprehensive analysis examining the evolution of markets and policies for all commodity groups, including energy, metals and agriculture, over the past century. He finds that while the amount of raw materials consumed has increased enormously, driven by population and income growth, the relative importance of raw materials has changed over time as technological innovation has created new uses for certain materials and facilitated substitution between raw materials. The study also shows that commodity markets are heterogeneous in terms of drivers, price behavior and macroeconomic impact across emerging markets and developing economies, and that the relationship between economic growth and commodity demand raw materials varies considerably from one country to another, depending on their stage of economic development. . Policy frameworks that allow for countercyclical macroeconomic responses have become increasingly common and beneficial. Other policy tools have had mixed results.

PRAISE FOR THE BOOK

“Discussions of emerging commodity-exporting markets are often based on ideas with little empirical and analytical support. This book, based on vigorous research, is a great contribution to improving our understanding of these economies. It provides evidence solid empirical evidence, including a long-term perspective on commodity prices. It also contains very in-depth policy analysis, with implications for resilience, macroeconomic policies and development strategies. It will be a key reference for academics as well as policy makers.

— José De Gregorio, Dean of the School of Economics and Business at the University of Chile, former Minister of Economy, Mines and Energy and Governor of the Central Bank of Chile

“Commodity Markets: Evolution Challenges and Policies is an in-depth analysis of just about everything you ever wanted to know about commodity markets. It covers a wide range of commodity prices and production (mainly commodity prices). energy, metals and agricultural commodities) last century, carefully documenting and rigorously analyzing the significant difference in experiences between different commodity groups It is comprehensive in its historical coverage but also addresses contemporary issues such as an analysis insight into the impact of the COVID19 pandemic and the war in Ukraine on commodity prices.It highlights the impact of shocks, technology and policies as drivers of demand and price. supply for a range of different commodities. This book is essential reading for anyone interested in the drivers of commodity prices and production in the past century and the implications for future trends.

–Warwick McKibbin, Emeritus Professor of Economics and Public Policy, Director of the Center for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Director of Policy Engagement at the Australian Research Center of Excellence in Population Aging Research, Australian National University

“A good understanding of commodity markets is more essential than ever in light of the Covid-19 pandemic, the war in Ukraine and the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy. This volume offers an excellent, comprehensive analysis It carefully examines historical and likely future trends in commodity supply, demand and prices, and offers detailed policy proposals to avoid the havoc that turbulent commodity markets can wreak. to the economies of commodity exporters and importers.”

— Rick Van der Ploeg, Research Director, Oxford Center for the Analysis of Resource-Rich Economies, University of Oxford

“Commodity prices tend to be viewed as an aggregate, especially when they periodically move together. While these aggregate movements are important, this excellent and well-researched book emphasizes the heterogeneity of commodity markets. and the different economic forces acting on them. Heterogeneity calls for differentiated and tailored policy tools that take into account the specificities of markets, a message that analysts and policy makers would do well to heed.”

— Ravi Kanbur, TH Lee Professor of World Affairs, International Professor of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University

“Commodity markets are complex and constantly changing. This insightful and well-structured survey of all the ins and outs of commodity markets is a valuable addition to the literature for understanding how these markets work and their impacts on the economy. world economy.As the war in Ukraine and the COVID-19 pandemic continue to have substantial impacts on commodity prices and supply chains, this incredibly timely study offers analysts and policymakers a solid basis for making better forecasts and developing more effective policy responses.

— Abdolreza Abbassian, former Senior FAO Economist and G20-AMIS Secretary

“While many African countries have been spared the ravages of the Covid-19 pandemic, their economies have suffered from the collapse in commodity prices. Since then, the war in Ukraine has affected developing countries to thousands of miles because the price of oil, gas and food has Not only are commodity markets impacted by global shocks, but they are transmitting them to commodity-dependent countries around the world. This book explains insight into how these shocks affect commodity markets and, in turn, how fluctuations in these markets affect developing economies.As the world grapples with climate change and the energy transition, these findings will become even more important .”

— Shanta Devarajan, Professor of International Development Practice, Georgetown University

Commodity markets: evolution, challenges and policies will provide the JP Morgan Center for Commodities with the complete manual that we have always wanted to write. Currently, the vast majority of commodity-related textbooks are dominated by trading issues, with limited emphasis on market fundamentals. As a result, our instructors typically draw on a wide range of articles, book chapters, and case studies for their respective courses. By providing comprehensive and detailed coverage of these issues, this book fills a major gap in the literature.”

— Tom Brady, Executive Director, JP Morgan Center for Commodities, University of Colorado Denver

“I wish I had this book earlier in my career! Commodity markets: evolution, challenges and policies provides an insightful analysis of the dynamics of commodity markets and their implications for the wider economy. A must read for anyone interested in commodity markets.”

— Xiaoli Etienne, Associate Professor and Idaho Wheat Board Endowed Chair in Commodity Risk Management, University of Idaho

OTHER BOOKS ON THE WORLD ECONOMY

A decade after the global recession (20/11/19)

Global productivity: trends, drivers and policies (04/07/20)

Inflation in Emerging and Developing Economies (07/11/18)

The long shadow of informality: challenges and policies (5/11/21)

Global Waves of Debt: Causes and Consequences (19/12/19)

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Australian Electoral Commission calls out misinformation https://endgradeinflation.org/australian-electoral-commission-calls-out-misinformation/ Sat, 14 May 2022 10:30:42 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/australian-electoral-commission-calls-out-misinformation/ Placeholder while loading article actions SYDNEY — The cartoon appeared online early on a Friday morning. Created by a far-right Australian party in the style of “South Park”, it has lit up social media with its crude jokes and false claims about stolen elections. In a Canberra office covered in computer screens, the alerts started […]]]>
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SYDNEY — The cartoon appeared online early on a Friday morning. Created by a far-right Australian party in the style of “South Park”, it has lit up social media with its crude jokes and false claims about stolen elections.

In a Canberra office covered in computer screens, the alerts started pouring in.

“This requires a #FactCheck,” one person tweeted.

“Isn’t that illegal?” another asked.

The Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) was tagged in the torrent of tweets. Within minutes, the federal agency responded, calling the video “fake” and “disappointing.” The agency’s actions quickly led Twitter to call the cartoon “misleading,” and Facebook and TikTok took it down altogether.

Aboriginal town’s acquittal awakens ghosts of Australia’s latest massacre

Last month’s incident reflects the growing wave of misinformation facing Australia as it prepares to go to the polls on Saturday. But it also shows the benefit of a single agency overseeing a country’s electoral process.

“We are truly on the frontline of protecting Australian democracy,” said AEC Digital Engagement Manager Evan Ekin-Smyth. “If we’re not in the conversations, advocating for elections, defending people’s perceptions of democracy, well, who are we?”

In the United States, elections are overseen by a patchwork of partisan state and local officials. Add to that the Electoral College and the system can sometimes feel chaotic or even susceptible to undue influence, as Americans have learned in 2020.

“There are myriad major and minor differences in how election laws and regulations are administered across America,” said Pippa Norris, a professor at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. “It violates fundamental principles of equality and consistency in electoral processes and voting rights, leads to excessively partisan considerations playing on the system, and encourages many abusive practices.”

Australia’s electoral system, on the other hand, is hailed by analysts around the world.

Steven J. Mulroy, a professor at the University of Memphis and author of a book on US election law, called it “the gold standard of election administration.”

In Australia, slot machines are everywhere. The same goes for gambling addiction.

Ariadne Vromen, a political scientist at the Australian National University, noted that few other countries have independent electoral commissions.

“It’s one of our good innovations, along with compulsory voting,” she said. “Australians trust these processes. They may not feel particularly warm or trust political actors, politicians themselves and political parties, but they do trust institutions.

That trust is now being tested.

The flood of misinformation that fueled the January 6, 2021 attack on the US Capitol has not spared Australia. Since the country’s last federal election in 2019, Ekin-Smyth said, false claims about Australia’s election have skyrocketed. Some seem to be imported from the United States.

“There have been allegations about the use of Dominion voting machines,” he said, citing a baseless claim pushed by former President Donald Trump and some of his advisers. “We don’t use Dominion voting machines. We’ve never done that, and yet people claim we’re going to use them and the election is rigged on top of it.

The challenges have changed, and so has the AEC.

When Ekin-Smyth joined in 2011, the AEC didn’t even have a Twitter account. A decade later, half a dozen people now help him tweet at a breakneck pace: up to two dozen times an hour. He also has accounts on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and YouTube, partnered with TikTok on an election guide and hosted an “Ask Me Anything” on Reddit.

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The goal is to counter false claims before they have a chance to spread.

“We’re not blind to the fact that social media moves incredibly fast,” Ekin-Smyth said. “And the action that social media organizations can take is brilliant. But the action we can take even faster by responding on our channels may be even more effective.

This action is sometimes serious, as when the AEC recently returned an allegedly dual-registered candidate to the Australian Federal Police for investigation.

However, the AEC also has a sense of humor, mixing posts on Crumpet the election cat and jokes and GIF.

“Their meme game is pretty strong,” Vromen said. “And informal language is really important. It’s personalized. It uses daily commitment standards. And that’s the kind of thing that people will notice and share.

Catchy tweets sometimes elicit pushback from critics who think the AEC should be more calmor even silent. But Ekin-Smyth said it was important to speak to people on their terms.

“We are a bunch of civil servants,” he said. “But most of Australia isn’t, and they don’t talk like them, so why should we?”

As the election approached, the AEC received dozens of complaints about false or misleading statements by candidates, parties or lobby groups. It only controls information about the political process, not political speech.

“A party or a candidate talks about another party, their policies, their history – we can’t be the truth regulators for that,” Ekin-Smyth said. “We don’t have legislation that allows it. But there would also be practical issues and perception issues if we made decisions about these things.

Koalas are getting harder and harder to find. Australian scientists are on a quest to discover a hidden population.

In March, for example, a conservative lobby group created a mobile billboard with a cartoon depicting Chinese President Xi Jinping voting for the centre-left Australian Labor Party. The AEC asked the group to changing the billboard – not for its message, but because it showed Xi’s ballot with a check mark on it. Australians are required to rank candidates or parties.

If there is misinformation online, the agency should be careful not to respond in a way that could amplify it.

When the far-right One Nation party released its video on April 29 falsely suggesting that illegal votes decided Australia’s 2010 federal election, Ekin-Smyth consulted with the AEC’s legal and executive teams before elaborating. answer.

“This commentary on the electoral system is very disappointing,” he said. tweeted from the AEC account. “Registered parties are aware of the election integrity measures in place, including information received/objection action taken for deceased Australians, and steps to verify outgoing and incoming absentee ballots.”

Some Twitter users complained he hadn’t been more strident, and Ekin-Smyth used stronger language in subsequent tweets. But he also didn’t want to fuel a controversy that would spread the video even more widely.

Meanwhile, colleagues were contacting social media companies, which called the video misleading or took it down.

“That was probably one of the most egregious examples we’ve seen,” Ekin-Smyth said. “Some of the claims in it are simply incorrect, and they clearly have the ability to undermine people’s faith in the system.”

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He ignored suggestions that the AEC was being unfair to One Nation. The commission did not take issue with the previous cartoons which, although crude, did not mislead people about the electoral system. One of them actually explained the preferential vote well, he said.

As social media fuels tribalism, the AEC requires all of its employees — including its 100,000 temporary election workers — to sign a declaration of political neutrality.

“There’s a lot of responsibility,” Ekin-Smyth said, “because a failed election — real or perceived — as we’ve seen in other jurisdictions, is potentially devastating.”

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‘Glass cliff’: Only two in 10 women Coalition and Labor candidates hold winnable seats, analysis finds | women in politics https://endgradeinflation.org/glass-cliff-only-two-in-10-women-coalition-and-labor-candidates-hold-winnable-seats-analysis-finds-women-in-politics/ Thu, 12 May 2022 10:01:00 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/glass-cliff-only-two-in-10-women-coalition-and-labor-candidates-hold-winnable-seats-analysis-finds-women-in-politics/ Female candidates are being overlooked to run in safe seats by both major parties, with new analysis showing that only two in 10 female candidates have been put forward for winnable seats in this year’s election, while safe seats are ‘reserved for boys”. Research from the Australian National University’s Global Institute for Women’s Leadership shows […]]]>

Female candidates are being overlooked to run in safe seats by both major parties, with new analysis showing that only two in 10 female candidates have been put forward for winnable seats in this year’s election, while safe seats are ‘reserved for boys”.

Research from the Australian National University’s Global Institute for Women’s Leadership shows that only 20% of female candidates running for the Coalition are vying for safe seats, compared to 46% of men who are expected to be elected.

For Labor the figures are slightly better, with 24% of female party candidates vying for safe seats compared to 33% of male candidates.

The analysis considers that an unwinnable seat is one that is considered by the Australian Electoral Commission to have a “safe” or “fairly safe” margin for the opposing party, i.e. seats with a margin greater than 6%.

The analysis focused only on seats where the main competition is between the main parties, examining candidates for 137 of the 151 seats in the House of Representatives, but also including incumbents.

Professor Michelle Ryan, director of the Global Institute for Women’s Leadership, said the research highlights the “cliff of glass” phenomenon where women are offered positions with more uncertainty, often in circumstances where men were not interested.

The term was first coined for the corporate sector to describe when women were put on corporate boards in times of crisis or when a company’s stock price had fallen.

“The idea behind all of this is that women are offered risky and precarious leadership positions,” she told Guardian Australia.

“So in this case with political candidates, it’s because their seats are unwinnable; or if they win the seats, then they’re in this sort of precarious, marginal state [and] they must spend all their time campaigning until the next election.

“It’s a poison gift, it looks good from the start but it’s not particularly great,” she said.

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For Labor, 76% of its women candidates are what Ryan calls “glass cliff candidates”, running for seats they are unlikely to win or are precarious to hold. The equivalent proportion of men occupying these seats is 67%.

For the Coalition, 80% of women candidates are in this category, against an equivalent proportion of men who run for these seats at 54%.

She said while it was difficult to judge each party’s internal shortlisting processes, safe seats appeared to be overwhelmingly reserved for men by the two major parties.

“If you have a good safe seat, you often see people being parachuted into that seat, and it’s often someone who’s in the alumni club; so you keep the seats safe for the boys,” Ryan said.

“You could say it just happens to leave the other seats for women – and I’m being slightly charitable there – but the flip side is saying, ‘he’s a dog of a seat, who wants that? Nobody wants that, and you protect your guys from that stuff.

“And if you want to be really uncharitable, you say ‘oh look, they’re forcing us to put women in and we’ll look bad if we don’t have enough women in there, so let’s put her in there, in as a bit of a sacrificial lamb”.

In the 2022 federal election, 43% of Labor candidates and 29% of coalition candidates are women.

Labor shortlisted a total of 62 women candidates, compared to 41 shortlisted by the Liberal and National parties.

During the 46th legislature, women made up 41% of Labor MPs in the lower house, compared to just 20% of coalition MPs.

In both parties, at least six female incumbents are contested by male candidates for marginal seats, while seven male incumbents are contested by female candidates.

Female Labor MPs seated in Lilley, Cowan and Gilmore are challenged by Liberal men, while male Labor candidates try to unseat Liberal women seated in Bass, Robertson and Lindsay.

Ryan said the research also highlighted the challenge faced by women from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds, who were even less likely to be shortlisted for safe seats.