Graduate Program – End Grade Inflation http://endgradeinflation.org/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 04:01:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://endgradeinflation.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Graduate Program – End Grade Inflation http://endgradeinflation.org/ 32 32 New Technology Used for Fall Career Fair https://endgradeinflation.org/new-technology-used-for-fall-career-fair/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 04:01:10 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/new-technology-used-for-fall-career-fair/ Photo Scarlett Patton. After two years of virtual fairs, the Career Center hosted the Fall 2022 Internship and Career Fair at the Sumers Recreation Center. According to Casey Jenkerson, acting associate director of employer relations at the Career Center, the latest fair was bigger than ever, drawing a large and diverse crowd of students and […]]]>

Photo Scarlett Patton.

After two years of virtual fairs, the Career Center hosted the Fall 2022 Internship and Career Fair at the Sumers Recreation Center. According to Casey Jenkerson, acting associate director of employer relations at the Career Center, the latest fair was bigger than ever, drawing a large and diverse crowd of students and businesses.

“[22%] of the [116] registrants are new employers at this year’s job fair and include companies such as Atomic Object, BASF Corporation, Electric Power Systems, Humana, Huron Consulting and UnitedHealth Group,” Jenkerson said. “We had a record number of over 2,200 students attending the fair.”

In addition to attracting new businesses, the Career Center has used Hand shake, which differentiates the Fall 2022 Job Fair from those of the past. Information about companies, employees who would be attending the show, and event times, such as company and graduate program presentations, were posted in advance on Handshake. Many students felt that this decision helped them prepare for the fair and evaluate companies and positions that interested them.

“A few companies have emailed [me] through [Handshake prior to the fair]and I was talking to them, because I had that immediate connection,” junior Reece Nicholson said.

First-year masters student Dominic Fulginiti also hailed the handshake as a new avenue to seek employment.

“[Handshake] gives me another range of options for places to search, in addition to LinkedIn and other websites. It is user-friendly and easy to navigate,” said Fulginiti.

Students weren’t the only ones to benefit from Handshake. Companies have used the service to connect with students at the job fair and customize their hiring processes.

“[With Handshake], we’ve added different ways to track people who come to see us,” a representative from Total Access Urgent Care said. “We can tailor their experiences so they see what their training process can look like.”

A recurring message from companies at the show was the importance of diversity, not just in terms of demographics, but also in terms of skill sets. Many companies highlighted the interdisciplinary nature of their work and encouraged students from all backgrounds to apply to their job postings.

“We’re open to people from all kinds of different backgrounds and minds,” a US Marine Corps representative said.

Other Career Center events and job opportunities are available on the Handshake website.

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Understanding reality through algorithms | MIT News https://endgradeinflation.org/understanding-reality-through-algorithms-mit-news/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/understanding-reality-through-algorithms-mit-news/ Although Fernanda De La Torre still has several years left in her higher education, she is already thinking big when it comes to what the future holds. “I dream of one day opening a school where I can bring this world of understanding cognition and perception to places that would never have contact with it,” […]]]>

Although Fernanda De La Torre still has several years left in her higher education, she is already thinking big when it comes to what the future holds.

“I dream of one day opening a school where I can bring this world of understanding cognition and perception to places that would never have contact with it,” she says.

It’s this kind of ambitious thinking that has brought De La Torre, a doctoral student in MIT’s Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, to this point. A recent recipient of the prestigious Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans, De La Torre found a creative and supportive research environment at MIT that allowed him to immerse himself in the cutting-edge science of artificial intelligence. But she is still driven by an innate curiosity for the human imagination and a desire to bring that knowledge to the communities in which she grew up.

An unconventional path to neuroscience

De La Torre’s first exposure to neuroscience was not in the classroom, but in his daily life. As a child, she watched her younger sister struggle with epilepsy. At age 12, she entered the United States illegally from Mexico to find her mother, exposing her to a whole new language and culture. Once in the United States, she had to deal with her mother’s changing personality in the midst of an abusive relationship. “All these different things I was seeing around me made me want to understand more about how psychology works,” De La Torre says, “to understand how the mind works, and how come we can all be in the same environment and feel very different things.

But finding an outlet for this intellectual curiosity was a challenge. As an undocumented immigrant, her access to financial assistance was limited. His high school was also underfunded and lacked elective options. However, mentors along the way encouraged the aspiring scientist, and through a program at her school, she was able to take courses at a community college to meet basic educational requirements.

It took an inspiring dedication to her education, but De La Torre came to Kansas State University for her undergraduate studies, where she majored in computer science and math. At Kansas State, she got her first real taste of research. “I was just fascinated by the questions they were asking and all this space that I hadn’t encountered,” De La Torre says of her experience working in a visual cognition lab and discovering the field. computational neuroscience.

Although Kansas State does not have a dedicated neuroscience program, her cognition research background led her to a machine learning lab run by computer science professor William Hsu. There De La Torre fell in love with the possibilities of using computation to model the human brain. Hsu’s support also convinced her that a career in science was a possibility. “He always made me feel capable of tackling big issues,” she says lovingly.

With the trust bestowed upon her at Kansas State, De La Torre arrived at MIT in 2019 as a post-baccalaureate student in the lab of Tomaso Poggio, Eugene McDermott Professor of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and researcher at the McGovern Institute for Brain Research. . Along with Poggio, also director of the Center for Brains, Minds and Machines, De La Torre began working on the theory of deep learning, an area of ​​machine learning focused on how artificial neural networks modeled on the brain can learn to recognize patterns and learn.

“It’s a very interesting question because we’re starting to use them everywhere,” De La Torre says of neural networks, citing examples ranging from self-driving cars to medicine. “But, at the same time, we don’t fully understand how these networks can go from knowing nothing and just being a bunch of numbers to producing things that make sense.”

Her experience as a post-graduate was De La Torre’s first real opportunity to apply the technical computer skills she developed as an undergraduate to neuroscience. It was also the first time she could fully concentrate on research. “It was the first time I had access to health insurance and a stable salary. It was, in itself, kind of life changing,” she says. “But on the research side, it was very intimidating at first. I was anxious and unsure if I belonged here.

Fortunately, De La Torre says she was able to overcome those insecurities, both through a growing unabashed enthusiasm for the field and through support from Poggio and her other colleagues in MIT’s Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. When the opportunity arose to apply for the department’s doctoral program, she jumped at the chance. “It was just knowing that these types of mentors were there and cared about their students,” De La Torre says of his decision to stay at MIT for graduate school. “It was really meaningful.”

Expand notions of reality and imagination

During her two years in the graduate program, De La Torre’s work expanded the understanding of neural networks and their applications to the study of the human brain. Working with Guangyu Robert Yang, a research associate at the McGovern Institute and an assistant professor in the departments of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Electrical and Computer Engineering, she engaged in what she describes as more philosophical questions about the how one develops a sense of self. as an independent being. She is interested in how this self-awareness develops and why it might be useful.

De La Torre’s main adviser, however, is Professor Josh McDermott, who heads the Computational Hearing Laboratory. With McDermott, De La Torre tries to understand how the brain integrates vision and sound. Although combining sensory input may seem like a basic process, many questions remain unanswered about how our brain combines multiple signals into a coherent impression or perception of the world. Many questions are raised by audio-visual illusions in which what we hear changes what we see. For example, if one sees a video of two discs crossing each other, but the clip contains the sound of a collision, the brain will perceive that the discs are bouncing rather than crossing each other. Faced with an ambiguous image, this simple auditory signal is enough to create a different perception of reality.

“There’s something interesting going on where our brain receives two signals telling us different things and yet we have to somehow combine them to make sense of the world,” she says.

De La Torre uses behavioral experiments to probe how the human brain makes sense of multisensory cues to construct a particular perception. To do this, she created various scenes of objects interacting in 3D space to different sounds, asking research participants to describe features of the scene. For example, in one experiment, she combines images of a block moving across a surface at different speeds with various scratching sounds, asking participants to estimate the roughness of the surface. Eventually, she hopes to bring the experience into virtual reality, where participants will physically push blocks in response to how they perceive the surface, rather than just reporting what they’re experiencing.

Once she collects data, she will move on to the modeling phase of the research, assessing whether multisensory neural networks perceive illusions the way humans do. “What we want to do is model exactly what happens,” says De La Torre. “How is it that we receive these two signals, integrate them and, at the same time, use all our prior knowledge and physics inferences to really make sense of the world?”

Although her two strands of research with Yang and McDermott may seem distinct, she sees clear connections between the two. Both projects aim to understand what artificial neural networks are capable of and what they tell us about the brain. On a more fundamental level, she says how the brain perceives the world from different sensory cues could be part of what gives people a sense of self. Sensory perception consists of constructing a coherent and unitary sense of the world from multiple sources of sensory data. Likewise, she argues, “sense of self is really a combination of actions, plans, goals, emotions, all these different things that are components in themselves, but somehow create a unitary being. “.

It’s an appropriate sentiment for De La Torre, who has worked to make sense of and integrate different aspects of his own life. Working in the Computational Hearing Lab, for example, she began experimenting with combining electronic music with folk music from her native Mexico, connecting her “two worlds”, as she puts it. Having the space to undertake these kinds of intellectual explorations, and colleagues who encourage it, is one of MIT’s De La Torre favorite parts.

“Beyond the professors, there are also a lot of students whose way of thinking amazes me,” she says. “I see a lot of goodness and excitement for science and a bit of – it’s not nervousness, but a love for very specific things – and I just like that.”

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Baylor chaplain John Maurer seeks to transform student-athletes https://endgradeinflation.org/baylor-chaplain-john-maurer-seeks-to-transform-student-athletes/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 15:54:29 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/baylor-chaplain-john-maurer-seeks-to-transform-student-athletes/ Baylor Chaplain John Maurer. (Photo courtesy of the Faith and Sports Institute) The Faith & Sports Institute (FSI) at Baylor University’s Truett Seminary was publicly launched in 2021. It is a place where Christian sports leaders are nurtured and equipped through theological education, compelling research, and training. practice. One of FSI’s supporters and collaborators is […]]]>

Baylor Chaplain John Maurer. (Photo courtesy of the Faith and Sports Institute)

The Faith & Sports Institute (FSI) at Baylor University’s Truett Seminary was publicly launched in 2021. It is a place where Christian sports leaders are nurtured and equipped through theological education, compelling research, and training. practice.

One of FSI’s supporters and collaborators is John Maurer, who has served as director of sports ministry for Baylor Athletics since 2018. FSI recently spoke with Maurer to discuss his journey in sports ministry and theological education , and why he thinks Baylor is a special place. for these two passions.

How did sports ministry become a vocation for you?

The seeds probably started in high school in Cleveland, Ohio, when friends from my football team dragged me to a youth group meeting. This is where I really learned what it means to know Jesus on a personal level. When I went to the University of Dayton to play football in the 1980s, I met a leader from Campus Crusade (now Cru) who trained me and my teammates and helped us grow.

This leader gave me the idea that I could do the ministry of sports. He basically told me that the things I was already doing—leading a Bible study, serving my teammates—were things I could do as a Campus Crusade athletic ministry staff member, Athletes in Action.

So that’s what I did. I graduated from Dayton in 1987 and joined the AIA team. I married my wife, Missy, shortly after, and she’s been with me ever since. We’ve had plenty of stops along the way, administering sports programs at Miami of Ohio and Rutgers, serving as a chaplain for the Chicago Bears, and spending a few years abroad in Kazakhstan.

But 35 years later, I’m still there, doing sports ministry, just in a different context now at Baylor.

Along the way, you became interested in theological education, earning a master’s degree in theology from a seminary in Chicago and now pursuing a Doctor of Ministry program at Truett Seminary. What sparked your interest?

When I started the ministry, I thought seminary was just for pastors. But over the next two years, I began to feel the need to grow intellectually, to learn the Bible, to learn to think theologically about everything in life and ministry.

That’s why I ended up doing an M.Div. in the early 1990s. My thought was never to have something that I could hang on the wall and say to people, “Call me Dr. Maurer.” For me it is about increasing in depth and knowledge, loving God with my heart, soul, mind and strength. It’s about being a continuous learner, always stretching and growing.

That’s why I started the D.Min. program at Truett a few years ago. I’m finishing my classes right now, and on the horizon is this thesis project which is really the focus of the degree. For this, I will essentially take a look at my life’s work – the discipleship of college student-athletes – and dive deep into the sports culture in which they were trained. What is it about this sports culture that actually helps Jesus’ disciples walk in his way and replicate it in others? What is it about this culture that impedes the process?

We will develop a curriculum, then design a research intervention and collect data to see if the elements we are putting in place actually move the needle in terms of helping the spiritual formation of student-athletes.

I know I don’t have a writing career ahead of me, but I feel like I have over 30 years of sports ministry experience to give, God willing, to the next generation. . Wouldn’t it be cool if this project could become something fruitful and usable, not just here at Baylor, but for other people working at the Department of Sports?

How does Baylor connect to your vision for the Ministry of Sports?

Our President, Dr. Linda Livingstone, explains how much the world needs a Baylor. I really think that’s true. It is a unique place, with the elite sporting level, academic orientation and Christian mission.

For me, the Ministry of Sports is a key part of this vision. We have this incredible opportunity within the Baylor Sports Ministry to impact the lives of our student-athletes, coaches and staff and see them transformed and then ultimately sent out into the world to impact people in and through sport, and probably in thousands of other ways, too.

And we also have these great resources. We have the Baylor Built program in athletics. We also have you at the Faith and Sports Institute, developing resources and training graduate students who can gain hands-on ministry experience with us, serving our student-athletes.

The goal is not just to meet spiritual needs. It is also to help those who already know Christ to embrace this larger vision of life and ministry in and through sport. Not just while they’re here, but as they leave and go in a whole lot of different directions – we want them to impact the Kingdom wherever they are.

If someone involved in sports asked you for advice on attending the seminar, what would you say?

I truly believe that a theological education is absolutely necessary to be a disciple of Jesus Christ. Learning the Bible, learning to think theologically, learning to love God with all your heart, soul, mind and strength – this is necessary for every follower of Christ

Now, this education can take various forms. It will not always be a seminar. But the cool thing is that in today’s world, there are many accessible and flexible options for people interested in formal theological training. So if anyone asked me, I would encourage them to discern like they do anything else: Seek the Lord, seek God’s guidance, gather information. God will make it clear if this is something He would have you do based on your calling and the direction of your life.

***

If you want to learn and grow with Faith & Sports Institute, visit our website to learn about our graduate programs, our online certificate program, and more.

—Paul Putz
Faith & Sports Institute, George W. Truett Theological Seminary, Baylor University

RELATED STORIES:
– At Baylor’s Truett Seminary, a center for Christian sports leaders
— Christians in sports should consider theological training. An NFL coach explains why

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U-RISE Supports Student Biomedical Research: UNM Newsroom https://endgradeinflation.org/u-rise-supports-student-biomedical-research-unm-newsroom/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 16:08:23 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/u-rise-supports-student-biomedical-research-unm-newsroom/ Among the many student research programs at the University of New Mexico, the only school in the state to hold the prestigious R1 designation in the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education, is the Research Training Initiative. Undergraduate for Student Enhancement (U-RISE). At the center of the U-RISE experience is research. U-RISE helps motivated […]]]>

Among the many student research programs at the University of New Mexico, the only school in the state to hold the prestigious R1 designation in the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education, is the Research Training Initiative. Undergraduate for Student Enhancement (U-RISE). At the center of the U-RISE experience is research.

U-RISE helps motivated students from underrepresented groups pursue higher education in biomedical research, explained program manager Jenna Fonta, who also serves as a mentor for the students.

“Our goal is to remove any obstacles they may encounter on their way to higher education. We help them connect with research mentors at UNM or support them in the relationships they already have with research mentors,” she said.

The other head teachers are Program Director and Biology Department Chair Cristina Takacs and Associate Director and Biology Professor Helen Wearing. Ph.D. student Conner Mertz serves as a mentor for U-RISE participants. English department keynote speaker Julianne Newmark and a graduate student working with her, Catherine Hubka, teach writing classes for U-RISE students.

Hispanics, Native Americans, blacks and other underrepresented ethnicities make up only about 8% of biomedical scientists in the United States, Fonta said.

“We have a very diverse student body at UNM and we want to help underrepresented students pursue fulfilling careers in biomedical science. Many students are unaware of the way forward to prepare for graduate school or may not have consistent funding to fully focus on their undergraduate work and research or lack mentors in the field to guide and support them. U-RISE is here to fill in the gaps for these already motivated students,” Fonta said.

U-RISE recruits rising juniors who have a GPA of 3.2 or higher, have strong letters of reference and demonstrate commitment to a career in biomedical research, she noted. Students are required to participate in research at an institution outside of New Mexico to gain further exposure to the biomedical science community, establish professional connections, and practice presenting their research at on-campus symposia and annually at the Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics & Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) Annual Conference. Students come to the annual SACNAS conference to present posters on their research. During the summer before their senior year, they travel to institutions outside of New Mexico to participate in summer research programs.

“It is important for students to step out of their comfort zone and push themselves to learn new skills. During their summer research, they must quickly become familiar with a new research topic, learn new techniques and use these techniques to contribute to the research project. They also learn to work with another PI and laboratory colleagues. Building a good relationship at another institution strengthens their network and their applications for graduate school,” Fonta said.

U-RISE gives participating students a head start on a career path, and students who have a supportive community are more likely to achieve their goals, Fonta said.

Recent graduates have gone to John’s Hopkins University, the University of Colorado at Denver, Duke University, and the Max Planck Institute.

“We primarily focus on research careers in academia as professors and senior researchers, as our ultimate goal is for U-RISE scholars to pursue and obtain a Ph.D. or a dual degree such as an MD/Ph.D. However, we also present scholars with alternative career paths, including scientists in industry or national laboratories, or starting a new biotech company,” said said Takacs.

Current researchers in the U-RISE program are:

Adina Abudushalamu, majoring in biochemistry with a minor in computer science, and is currently identifying a research mentor.

Daisy Belmares-Ortega, a Mechanical Engineering major with a minor in Applied Mathematics, and mentored by Professor Rama Gullapalli of UNM’s Department of Pathology.

Diego DeMmon, with specialization in Chemistry and Biology, and supervised by Professor Iréne Salinas, Department of Biology.

​Alexa Gonzalez, majoring in Biology and Spanish, and mentored by Mubarak Syed, Department of Biology.

​Brandi Hess, biochemistry major, also mentored by Syed.

​Ellie Larence, Computer Science major, and mentored by Melanie Moses, Department of Computer Science.

​Marelessis Palomino, specializing in chemical engineering, and supervised by Diane Lidke, Department of Pathology

Brenda Ramos Villanueva, majoring in biology, and supervised by Christopher Witt, Department of Biology

Julian Rojo, majoring in Chemical Engineering, concentration in Bioengineering, with minors in Mathematics and Chemistry, also mentored by Lidke.

​Brendan Sanders, specializing in biochemistry, and supervised by Mark McCormick, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

“In our program, we not only prepare students for acceptance into top graduate programs, we prepare them to thrive once in those programs. They will use the skills they are starting to learn here throughout their careers,” added Fonta. “In U-RISE, we create a small community of students who are all working towards the same goal. The U-RISE team of faculty and staff all have advanced degrees and are here to support and mentor students on their journey to complete their degrees and enter graduate school with confidence.

Image: Attendees at the U-RISE Summer Research Symposium in August gave presentations on their projects and received feedback and support. Back row: Julian Rojo, Diego DeMmon, Cristina Takacs, Conner Mertz, Ellie Larence and Adina Abudushalamu; Front row: Jenna Fonta, Brandi Hess, Helen Wearing, Daisy Belmares-Ortega, Brenda Ramos Villanueva, Alexa Gonzalez and Brendan Sanders. Not pictured: Marelessis Palomino.

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Flathead Business Journalists | Daily Inter Lake https://endgradeinflation.org/flathead-business-journalists-daily-inter-lake/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 07:02:31 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/flathead-business-journalists-daily-inter-lake/ FEC Raffle Stands for Food Banks Representatives from Kalispell, Columbia Falls, Whitefish, West Shore, Libby and Veterans food banks gathered at Flathead Electric Cooperative on Friday, September 9 to celebrate the results of this year’s Ribeye raffle. Organized by the co-op to support local food banks, the 2022 Ribeye Raffle raised $22,725 in cash and […]]]>


FEC Raffle Stands for Food Banks

Representatives from Kalispell, Columbia Falls, Whitefish, West Shore, Libby and Veterans food banks gathered at Flathead Electric Cooperative on Friday, September 9 to celebrate the results of this year’s Ribeye raffle.

Organized by the co-op to support local food banks, the 2022 Ribeye Raffle raised $22,725 in cash and approximately 1,000 pounds of meat to donate to the seven food banks.

As part of its commitment to community members owning the co-op, Flathead Electric purchases beef, lamb and pork each year at the 4-H and FFA (Future Farmers of America) Market Sale at the Northwest Montana Fair. Most of the meat goes to food banks, except for the best steaks, which are raffled off. This year, the co-op purchased beef from Clara Giffin and Tristen Cheff; the lambs of Cadance Jones and Wyatt Bernier; and the pigs of Dylan Benson and Bentley Braaten.

The winners of the raffle were announced on August 23. Dana Brown and Susan Gudmunson, both of Columbia Falls, each received about 60 one-inch-thick Montana sirloin and rib eye steaks worth more than $500.

Will Tutvedt, the Co-op’s Community Outreach Specialist and organizer of the Ribeye Raffle, is delighted with the results of this year’s raffle and shared, “It’s just amazing; when we started the Ribeye raffle, we raised about $1,000 every year. The pandemic shutdown forced us to sell our sales online, and that turned out to be the best thing that could have happened to the Ribeye Raffle. Ticket sales increased to over $10,000 the first year they were online and surpassed $20,000 for the first time this year. Our members are so generous and as a co-op we are happy to be able to organize this effort and give to our community food banks in such a meaningful way.

Over the past seven years, Ribeye Raffle has raised $52,386 in cash and donated approximately 6,000 pounds of meat to food banks in Kalispell, Columbia Falls, Whitefish, Bigfork, Lakeside, Libby and Veterans. Ticket sales are closed for 2022 but will be available in summer 2023 for purchase online, at the Co-op’s Libby and Kalispell offices, and at the Co-op’s booth at the Northwest Montana Fair.

WCU announces additions to leadership team

Whitefish Credit Union has announced the following five additions to the management team.

• Jennifer Archer has been promoted to Senior Vice President of Lending Operations. Archer most recently served as vice president of credit administration supporting the loan portfolio. She joined Whitefish Credit Union in 2005 and held several positions within the credit union before overseeing lending operations. Archer serves on the board of Women Who Wine, a local nonprofit that highlights and raises funds for other nonprofits. She graduated from Flathead High School and is currently attending CUNA Management School, a leadership program for credit union executives.

• Cory Coopman has been promoted to Senior Vice President of IT and Project Management. Coopman joined the credit union as vice president of information technology in 2018 and brings more than two decades of deep experience managing and improving information technology systems. Coopman graduated from Arizona State University with a business degree in computer information systems, and he actively volunteers in the community coaching youth sports.

• Cheryl Mintz recently joined Whitefish Credit Union as Senior Vice President of Human Resources. She holds an MBA and JD from Tulane University, with additional certifications in mediation and arbitration. Mintz is a certified member of the Montana Bar Association and has extensive experience in multiple industries. She holds a private pilot license, a diving license and a black belt in judo. In her spare time, she has supported numerous charities and is a Soprano II member of the Glacier Symphony Chorale group.

• Matt Venturini has been promoted to senior vice president of loans. Venturini started with Whitefish Credit Union in 2011 as a credit analyst. After six years at Glacier Bank, he joined the credit union as Vice President, Head of Home Lending before being promoted to his current role overseeing all aspects of Whitefish Credit Union lending. Venturini graduated from Flathead High School and earned a degree in finance from Concordia College. He is Chairman of the Board of Habitat for Humanity Flathead Valley.

• Josh Wilson has been promoted to Senior Vice President of Marketing. Wilson has worked for Whitefish Credit Union since 2017, previously serving as vice president of marketing. He has over sixteen years of financial services experience and is an adjunct instructor in West Virginia University’s Data Marketing Communications and Digital Marketing Communications graduate programs. Josh received his master’s degree from West Virginia University.

Riley recognized for his work with H&R Block

Celina M. Riley of Kalispell has just been named one of 25 people nationwide to be recognized for the 2022 Henry Bloch Awards for Excellence in Customer Service for H&R Block. Riley is bold and always working to grow H&R Block’s presence in her area.

Each recipient has been chosen to go above and beyond in customer care and reflect the behaviors and purpose of H&R Block: to provide help and inspire trust in our customers and communities around the world.

Mann Mortgage wins award for connecting buyers with down payment assistance

Kalispell-based Mann Mortgage received the HomeNow Top Lending Institution award from MoFi, a nonprofit that has served Montanans for more than 30 years.

Mann Mortgage won the award because its loan officers helped connect the most homebuyers in Montana to MoFi’s HomeNow down payment assistance program in 2021. HomeNow helps increase access to property among Montanese who have good income and good credit, but need help with the down payment. Mann Mortgage has received the award five years in a row since 2016, when HomeNow down payment assistance was first offered.

Based in Kalispell, the company also has branches in Billings, Bozeman, Great Falls, Helena, Missoula, Polson, Stevensville and Whitefish.

“HomeNow’s down payment assistance has been an extremely valuable resource for Mann Mortgage,” said Steve Paulson, Branch Manager for Mann Mortgage in Kalispell. “Many of our clients throughout the state of Montana would not have been able to achieve their dream of homeownership without the program, and we feel both privileged and proud to be Montana’s Lender of the Year. MoFi for the fifth consecutive year.”

Homebuyers can access HomeNow down payment assistance through a participating mortgage lender. It comes in the form of a deferred loan at 0% interest. Buyers can receive up to 5% of their total loan amount, and assistance can be used for both down payment and closing costs. The program is not limited to first-time home buyers. Since launching the program in late 2016, MoFi has helped nearly 600 Montana residents become homeowners.

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UCA film school graduates add diversity to program https://endgradeinflation.org/uca-film-school-graduates-add-diversity-to-program/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 06:36:36 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/uca-film-school-graduates-add-diversity-to-program/ I graduated in 2015 from the Master of Fine Arts program at the University of Central Arkansas. My class produced three filmmakers that year, all three white, male, and in their thirties. Come to think of it, the previous class also had three white male students. Even the class after mine had the same thing: […]]]>

I graduated in 2015 from the Master of Fine Arts program at the University of Central Arkansas. My class produced three filmmakers that year, all three white, male, and in their thirties. Come to think of it, the previous class also had three white male students. Even the class after mine had the same thing: three white male students. Among Us Nine, the majority of our shorts focused on horror and sci-fi, but I guess when you have such a small group of students, there are only so many stories different that they can tell.

This lack of diversity isn’t necessarily the fault of the film department, as we see this issue crop up quite often in Hollywood. Women, people of color, and minorities of all kinds have always struggled to break into the industry. But over the past few years, we’ve seen a few people break the celluloid ceiling. For example, female Oscar nominations have increased in several categories. In the past two years alone, we’ve seen two women win the Oscar for Best Direction: Chloe Zhao for “Nomadland” and Jane Campion for “The Power of the Dog.” Hollywood still has a long way to go to create equity in its industry, but UCA is making great strides in cultivating large numbers of inclusive students of filmmakers.

This year’s crop of graduates includes a couple of international students, one of whom is a woman. Nathaly Moreno is from Honduras. She ended up in central Arkansas through an exchange student program and earned her bachelor’s degree at UCA, choosing to stay an additional three years to complete her master’s degree. As a filmmaker, his shorts tend to focus on Hispanic characters. His graduation thesis film is no different. It’s called “Strawberry”. The film focuses on the quinceanera of the youngest daughter of a Honduran family, Adela. The family emigrated to the United States before Adela was born, which causes her some identity crisis, where she is not completely Honduran or American. And this internal cultural struggle creates conflicts with the older members of his family. And it’s up to Adela’s cousin, Marta, to help her family bridge the generational and cultural gaps.

DIVERSITY IN CINEMA

“Strawberry” is still in pre-production, but they are already feeling the effects of a project’s ambition. The biggest problem the production has had so far is casting. The film has a mostly Hispanic cast who must be fluent in Spanish, and on top of that they need actors in a variety of different age brackets – from kids to seniors. Unfortunately, in central Arkansas, finding actors who fit these demographics can be difficult, if not impossible. And Moreno and his longtime film partner and producer Daniel Beltram, another UCA alumnus, are up for the challenge.

“Strawberry” isn’t the only graduate thesis film this year that’s having its share of struggles. Sumit Kumar, a student from Nepal, made the decision to abandon his thesis project and start over from scratch. Prior to entering UCA’s graduate program, Kumar had no formal film training. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Mississippi for Women. But when covid-19 hit, he made the decision to switch from information technology to his personal passion, cinema. So, from Nepal to Mississippi to central Arkansas, over 8,000 miles, Kumar wanted to tell personal stories about his culture and about minorities and their experiences.

But he encountered the same problem as Moreno: the casting. There is even less Nepali representation in the Central Arkansas acting community than Hispanics. So Kumar made the decision to change his entire script. Instead of focusing his project on the Nepalese, he focused on the black population in the South. Kumar said that after arriving in America, he was first exposed to the Blaxploitation movement of the 1970s, with films such as “Shaft” and “Superfly”. He says he finds a camaraderie because as a Nepalese he is a minority in the greater Indian region, and since moving to the United States he has become part of an even smaller population. Kumar believes that all minorities have very similar struggles and believes he is able to convey this through his cinema.

“EMPATHY TOWARDS THINGS”

But even this year’s white male graduates are focused on diversity. Arkansas-born CJ Mirch’s thesis film focuses on a strong female cast. The title of his film is “Mono No Aware”, which is a Japanese expression that translates to “an empathy towards things”. The plot revolves around two estranged sisters who discover a mysterious old note hidden in the walls of their recently purchased house. The sisters then go on an adventure to try to find the note’s author and hopefully, in doing so, mend their own relationship.

For Mirch, the phrase “Mono No Aware” is more of a bittersweet realization that everything in existence is temporary. He drew on his own personal experiences as most of his extended family lives on the West Coast, creating a strain on his relationships with loved ones. He hopes to show his audience that no matter how much time has passed or how many conflicts have arisen, most relationships can be rebuilt. This type of film is a bit outside Mirch’s wheelhouse, as it tends to focus on pessimistic narratives with depressing endings. But he wants to end his graduate student term on a more uplifting note.

This year’s cohort of graduating students have ambitious plans ahead of them. But they have the utmost confidence in their abilities. They have spent the past two years studying all facets of filmmaking and developing their abilities just to get to this point in their school careers. They passed all their comprehensive exams and defended their projects in front of their thesis committees.

All that remains is to film their films, edit them and screen them. You can follow Moreno and Mirch’s progress by following their Instagram and crowdfounding pages: @strawberryfilm2022 and @mononoaware_film2023. And their finished products will be screened at UCA at the end of the spring semester.

University of Central Arkansas graduate film student and writer-director CJ Mirch showcases his thesis film “No Mono Aware” in a YouTube video.
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AbbVie Announces Public Voting Open for 30th Annual Cystic Fibrosis Thriving Student Awards https://endgradeinflation.org/abbvie-announces-public-voting-open-for-30th-annual-cystic-fibrosis-thriving-student-awards/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 15:52:29 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/abbvie-announces-public-voting-open-for-30th-annual-cystic-fibrosis-thriving-student-awards/ Online and mobile voting is now open to the public via September 28 to help determine this year’s two Thriving Scholars Forty students living with cystic fibrosis (CF) are in the running for both $25,000 awards based on academic excellence, creativity, and community involvement/extracurricular activities This year’s scholarship program […]]]>

  • Online and mobile voting is now open to the public via September 28 to help determine this year’s two Thriving Scholars
  • Forty students living with cystic fibrosis (CF) are in the running for both $25,000 awards based on academic excellence, creativity, and community involvement/extracurricular activities
  • This year’s scholarship program brands 30 years of AbbVie’s commitment to students with cystic fibrosis pursuing graduate studies


NORTH CHICAGO, Illinois., September 14, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — AbbVie today announced the start of its two-week public voting period for the 2022 Thriving Undergraduate and Graduate Scholarships. Following this voting period, scholarships totaling $25,000 each will be awarded to two commendable students with cystic fibrosis (CF), a chronic, inherited disease that affects the lungs and digestive system.


From today until September 28 at 10:00 a.m. Central Time, the public is encouraged to visit the official AbbVie CF Scholarship website (www.AbbVieCFScholarship.com) to learn more about this year’s top 40 scholars through their essays and creative presentations. The public can then vote to help select the 2022 Undergraduate and Graduate Scholarship recipients. the two-week public voting period.


“In addition to being a recipient of the AbbVie CF Fellowship, I am grateful that I was able to share my cystic fibrosis story with the world,” said Melissa W., 2021 Thriving Graduate Student. “As I pursue my studies in human resource management on this scholarship, I am excited to continue using my voice to inspire and advocate for others.”


Earlier this year, AbbVie selected 40 undergraduate and graduate students living with CF as recipients of a $3,000 scholarship to be used during the 2022-2023 academic year. The award was based on their academic excellence, creativity and involvement in the community/extracurricular activities. These 40 students now have the opportunity to obtain the title of “Prosperous Undergraduate or Graduate Student 2022” and another $22,000 in the financing of scholarships for their higher education. The two winners will be determined by the number of valid votes cast by the public and the cumulative points awarded to each scholar by AbbVie’s judging panel who evaluated the students’ essays and creative presentations.


“The 30e anniversary of the AbbVie CF Scholarship Program commemorates the community of students we have been able to support over the years in their efforts to pursue higher education,” said John Duffey, Vice President, US Specialty, AbbVie. “The Top 40 recipients of 2022 are beyond deserving and have impressed us all with their inspiring stories and ambitions to pursue their goals while living with CF.


AbbVie will announce the 2022 thriving undergraduate and graduate students in early November.


About Cystic Fibrosis
Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic, inherited disease that affects the lungs, pancreas, and other organs of people with this disease.1 In patients with cystic fibrosis, thick, sticky mucus is produced in certain organs of the body, most commonly the lungs and the digestive system. Mucus buildup in the lungs can lead to difficulty breathing and lead to life-threatening lung infections. In the pancreas, thick mucus can prevent the release of digestive enzymes and proper digestion of food, which can lead to malabsorption and malnutrition.


About AbbVie CF Scholarship
The AbbVie CF Scholarship was established 30 years ago in recognition of the financial burdens faced by many families affected by CF and to recognize the achievements of students with CF. Since its inception, the scholarship program has awarded more than $3.7 million in scholarships to more than 1,000 students. The AbbVie CF Scholarship is part of AbbVie’s ongoing commitment to the CF community, which includes more than 30,000 people in United States. Today, more than half of the CF population is 18 years of age or older.1


Fellowship applicants do not need to have taken, are currently taking, or intend to take in the future any drug or product marketed by AbbVie, and this is not considered in the eligibility criteria. selection. More information on the AbbVie CF scholarship criteria and application can be found at www.AbbVieCFScholarship.com.


About AbbVie
AbbVie’s mission is to discover and deliver innovative medicines that solve the serious health problems of today and meet the medical challenges of tomorrow. We strive to have a remarkable impact on people’s lives in several key therapeutic areas: immunology, oncology, neuroscience, eye care, virology, women’s health and gastroenterology, in addition products and services from its Allergan Aesthetics portfolio. For more information about AbbVie, visit www.abbvie.com. Follow @abbvie on TwitterFacebook, LinkedIn or Instagram.




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SOURCEAbbVie

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What is at stake in the Brazilian elections? https://endgradeinflation.org/what-is-at-stake-in-the-brazilian-elections/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 13:42:43 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/what-is-at-stake-in-the-brazilian-elections/ At a recent roundtable, a group of university professors and graduate students discussed the challenges the country faces as it prepares for the October 2 presidential elections. Brazil will vote to elect a new president on October 2. Whoever ends up in the presidential seat inherits a host of challenges: high inflation, rising unemployment and […]]]>

At a recent roundtable, a group of university professors and graduate students discussed the challenges the country faces as it prepares for the October 2 presidential elections.



Brazil will vote to elect a new president on October 2. Whoever ends up in the presidential seat inherits a host of challenges: high inflation, rising unemployment and extreme polarization of the electorate.

The two main contenders are Jair Bolsonaro, the incumbent president, and former president Luis Inácio da Silva.

Bolsonaro is a right-wing ex-military officer who came to power in 2019. Although he tackled a failing economy early in his tenure, Bolsonaro is seen as a strongman who has rolled back environmental protections and implemented peril the indigenous peoples of the Amazon and across the country.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Bolsonaro repeatedly downplayed the severity of the plague, avoiding wearing a mask. Many blame it for the increase in infections and deaths. Brazil has recorded more than 680,000 deaths from COVID-19, second only to the United States.

Da Silva, who is leading in the polls, is a member of the Workers’ Party and was president from 2003 to 2010. He enjoyed great popularity during his tenure due in part to a commodities boom that has propelled the country into several years of prosperity and social policies that helped many people enter the middle class.

Although jailed for 580 days for money laundering and corruption, in 2019 the Supreme Federal Court cleared da Silva of all charges and he was released from prison.

On September 7, the day of the bicentenary of Brazilian independence, several university professors and graduate students from the Department of Modern Languages ​​and Literatures Michelle Bowman Underwood organized a seminar entitled “What is at stake in the elections presidential elections in Brazil? »

The presenters all agreed that Bolsonaro’s administration has been marked by an increase in the decimation of indigenous areas and a complete disregard for indigenous peoples, a huge increase in the deforestation of Amazon lands for use as cattle ranches and farms of soybeans, and a marked persecution of members of the LGBTQ community.

Brazil’s indigenous peoples have been marginalized and discriminated against for decades. It wasn’t until 1988 that more than 300 indigenous peoples were granted the constitutional right to be both Brazilian and indigenous, said Tracy Devine Guzmán, associate professor of Latin American studies and coordinator of Native American studies and world.

“Before that time, indigenous peoples shared the status of minors and mentally handicapped people,” Devine Guzmán said. Although they held the constitutional right to differentiated citizenship, including territorial rights, more than three decades ago, their lands have been under constant threat.

“The current administration has promoted an acrimonious political discourse that actually ends up pitting the well-being of indigenous peoples against that of their compatriots, especially the non-indigenous poor,” Devine Guzmán said. “This message divides. This is dangerous, and it suggests that occupying Indigenous lands is somehow a matter of benevolence rather than a constitutional right.

The state has again become a perpetrator of violence against indigenous peoples, against their lands and against the defenders who work on their behalf, according to Devine Guzmán.

Indeed, the Brazilian government has aggressively eroded environmental land protections in the Amazon, resulting in an “environmental disaster,” according to PhD student Sam Johnson. candidate in Literary, Cultural and Linguistic Studies who has presented the impact of extractionism in recent years.

Since Bolsonaro took office, the government has allowed and encouraged the continued expansion of mining and agribusiness into protected and designated indigenous lands. Many of the wildfires that raged in the Amazon in 2019 were human-caused, intended to clear land for mining and other uses, Johnson said. The loss of primary forests in the Amazon region has increased significantly since the current administration took office, he said.

“All of these events point to the extractivist agenda of the current government and what is really at risk in the upcoming election,” Johnson noted.

Brazil is also one of the most dangerous places in the world for women, said Steve Butterman, associate professor and director of the Portuguese program in Michele Bowman Underwood’s department of modern languages ​​and literatures, who presented the theme “Femicide, impunity and misogyny”.

Brazil is the world’s leading perpetrator of LGBTQ+ killings and femicides, according to Butterman. “Violence against women is at an all-time high in the country,” he said.

“Even after passing the Femicide Law (a 2015 law that recognizes that women have been killed because of their gender), Brazil does not identify and punish gender-based killings,” Butterman explained. . According to the Brazilian Public Security Forum, four girls under the age of 13 are raped every hour in the country, he pointed out.

Every minute in 2021, police in Brazil received an average report of intimate partner violence. However, the vast majority of those reports fell on deaf ears, he said.

Butterman said he continues to serve as an expert witness in dozens of asylum cases for members of Brazil’s LGBTQ community. It also helps survivors of severe domestic violence who seek asylum in the United States because they face stigma and persecution.

Seminar participants agreed that Brazil’s challenges would not end if a leftist president was elected. But many have said they hope existing legislation protecting many marginalized groups will have a better chance of being enforced if Bolsonaro loses.

Gabriel Das Chagas, a doctoral student in literary, cultural and linguistic studies, spoke about the history of Brazilian colonialism and institutionalized racism, stating that if daDilva won: “At least we would have a president who believes in and respects the Constitution.




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Three faculty members hired at Penn State Wilkes-Barre https://endgradeinflation.org/three-faculty-members-hired-at-penn-state-wilkes-barre/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 23:42:54 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/three-faculty-members-hired-at-penn-state-wilkes-barre/ DALLAS, Pa. — Penn State Wilkes-Barre has hired three full-time faculty, Chancellor Lynda Goldstein announced. Adriana Dinescu has been appointed assistant professor of chemistry; Lori Dunn, previously an on-campus adjunct teacher, was hired as a corporate lecturer; and Henrique Oliveira was appointed assistant professor of teaching in topographical engineering. All three are teaching classes for […]]]>

DALLAS, Pa. — Penn State Wilkes-Barre has hired three full-time faculty, Chancellor Lynda Goldstein announced. Adriana Dinescu has been appointed assistant professor of chemistry; Lori Dunn, previously an on-campus adjunct teacher, was hired as a corporate lecturer; and Henrique Oliveira was appointed assistant professor of teaching in topographical engineering. All three are teaching classes for the fall semester.

“We welcome Dr. Dinescu and Dr. Oliveira to Penn State Wilkes-Barre and are delighted that Ms. Dunn will continue to teach here,” Goldstein said. “Their commitment to education, research, and developing relationships with students will be felt throughout our campus and beyond.”

ACS Fellow Dinescu holds a PhD in Inorganic Computational Chemistry from the University of North Texas, an MS in Chemistry from the University of North Texas, and a BS in Chemistry from the University of North Texas. Polytechnic University of Bucharest in Romania. She completed postdoctoral training at the Idaho National Laboratory and Washington State University.

Dinescu previously worked as a tenured associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry at Centenary University in New Jersey, an assistant professor of chemistry at Wilkes University, and a lecturer at Butler University in Indiana. She has taught graduate level courses in physical chemistry, computational chemistry, biochemistry and environment, toxicology, and inorganic chemistry, as well as introductory chemistry courses for non-science majors. Dinescu designed and implemented new experiments for courses with a laboratory component.

At Wilkes University, she coordinated all general chemistry labs and was also co-counsellor of the Wilkes University Chemistry Club, which received commendable and outstanding awards from the American Chemical Society (ACS) during this time.

“I look forward to being part of the tight-knit Penn State Wilkes-Barre community and I look forward to meeting my students this fall,” Dinescu said. “As soon as I set foot on this Penn State campus, I was impressed by its splendor. Then I met great people who are passionate about student success and well-being. As a new faculty member, it will be an honor to serve and support our students throughout their academic journey. »

Dunn has been a part-time instructor at Penn State Wilkes-Barre since 2006, primarily teaching tax and financial and management accounting courses. She has also taught accounting courses at Penn State’s World Campus since 2015.

A chartered accountant, Dunn also worked as a full-time faculty member at Luzerne County Community College, where she also served as business department coordinator and adjunct professor at Misericordia University. In her 20 year career in education, she has taught courses in accounting, cost accounting, tax accounting, small business management, taxation, management, marketing, business communication, finance , personal management and more.

Prior to becoming an educator, Dunn worked professionally in her field as a controller, tax supervisor and senior accountant. She holds a Masters in Taxation from King’s College and a bachelor’s degree in accounting from King’s College. She is the past president of the Northeast Chapter of the Institute of Public Accountants of Pennsylvania (PICPA) and has volunteered on PICPA committees at the local and state level.

“I’m very excited to join the Penn State Wilkes-Barre team,” Dunn said. “I look forward to participating in the education and growth of students from college through graduation and beyond. Having a positive effect on someone’s life is an incredible experience for me.

Oliveira recently worked as an Assistant Professor at the University of Campinas – Brazil, where he was Associate Head of Department for the Department of Infrastructure and Environment. He taught undergraduate courses in geomatics (another name for surveying engineering) to students enrolled in civil engineering, architecture, agricultural engineering, and geology, as well as graduate courses to civil engineering students. He was previously Assistant Professor at the Federal University of Uberlândia (UFU) – Brazilian School of Cartographic Engineering.

Oliveira has worked on projects in various fields, including the acquisition of spatial data from different sensors (LiDAR, visible and multispectral imagery, GNSS receivers and others), the development of a low-cost mobile mapping system, l integration of sensors for transport purposes, aerial photogrammetry use of low-cost UAVs as a platform, precision agriculture, generation of software for image and point cloud processing, evaluation of different techniques for 3D model generation, Internet of Things and smart cities. He has also developed virtual surveying materials to help students understand how surveying techniques are applied in the field.

Oliveira obtained a doctorate and a master’s degree in cartographic sciences from the State University of São Paulo and a bachelor’s degree in cartographic engineering, also from the State University of São Paulo. During his doctoral studies, he had the opportunity to develop part of his research at Purdue University within the Digital Photogrammetry Research Group.

“It’s a pleasure to be part of the Penn State Wilkes-Barre team,” Oliveira said. “I am thrilled to join the surveying program and collaborate in the high standard of education for Penn State students. I hope to help the surveying program maintain its momentum and achieve its long-term goals.

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Graduate student wins academic and athletic scholarships | News, Sports, Jobs https://endgradeinflation.org/graduate-student-wins-academic-and-athletic-scholarships-news-sports-jobs/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 06:03:50 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/graduate-student-wins-academic-and-athletic-scholarships-news-sports-jobs/ CASEY HIBBARD LOCK HAVEN – Casey Hibbard, of Rochester, NY, is the recipient of the Commonwealth University-Lock Haven Athletic Training Alumni Scholarship and the Chris Andorfer Ward Memorial Lacrosse Scholarship for the 2022-23 school year. Hibbard graduated in 2022, summa cum laude, from Lock Haven’s 3+2 Health Sciences program, with a […]]]>

CASEY HIBBARD

LOCK HAVEN – Casey Hibbard, of Rochester, NY, is the recipient of the Commonwealth University-Lock Haven Athletic Training Alumni Scholarship and the Chris Andorfer Ward Memorial Lacrosse Scholarship for the 2022-23 school year.

Hibbard graduated in 2022, summa cum laude, from Lock Haven’s 3+2 Health Sciences program, with a concentration in Exercise Science. This fall, she began graduate school in Lock Haven’s athletic training program.

Along with having a 3.82 GPA as an undergrad, Hibbard is also a member of the Bald Eagles lacrosse team and an active member of the Athletic Training Club, Veteran Student Alliance and the Student-Athlete Advisory Council.

Originally drawn to The Haven by its family atmosphere and welcoming campus community, Hibbard said she enjoys representing the university as a student-athlete and appreciates the high-quality education and support of faculty, coaches and staff who she believes make the university a very special place.

“I’m confident you won’t be able to find a more supportive group of teachers, coaches and staff anywhere else,” Hibard said. “They’ll push you to be the best student you can be, while teaching you real-world problem solving and interpersonal skills for life after college.”

Hibbard’s scholarships have also had a significant positive impact on his experience at Haven by helping to ease the financial stress of going to college and allowing him to get the most out of his academic and athletic experiences.

“I would not be able to compete in lacrosse and achieve my academic and professional goals without these scholarships,” Hibard said. “Through lacrosse, I learned leadership and problem-solving skills while receiving an incredible education. My passion for the athletic training field continues to grow and I am truly honored to be the recipient of these scholarships and to have the opportunity to continue to make the most of my athletic and academic career.

In the future, Hibbard aspires to become an athletic trainer at the college level or in the burgeoning field of public safety athletic training.



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