Graduate Program – End Grade Inflation http://endgradeinflation.org/ Wed, 25 May 2022 06:30:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://endgradeinflation.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Graduate Program – End Grade Inflation http://endgradeinflation.org/ 32 32 IBM and MBZUAI join forces to advance AI research with new Center of Excellence https://endgradeinflation.org/ibm-and-mbzuai-join-forces-to-advance-ai-research-with-new-center-of-excellence/ Wed, 25 May 2022 06:30:00 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/ibm-and-mbzuai-join-forces-to-advance-ai-research-with-new-center-of-excellence/ The collaboration will focus on three key pillars: natural language processing (NLP), including Arabic, AI applications in healthcare, and sustainability. Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, May 25, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Mohamed bin Zayed University of Artificial Intelligence (MBZUAI) – the world’s first graduate research university dedicated to artificial intelligence (AI) – has announced plans for […]]]>

The collaboration will focus on three key pillars: natural language processing (NLP), including Arabic, AI applications in healthcare, and sustainability.

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, May 25, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Mohamed bin Zayed University of Artificial Intelligence (MBZUAI) – the world’s first graduate research university dedicated to artificial intelligence (AI) – has announced plans for a strategic collaboration with IBM (NYSE: IBM). Senior leaders from both organizations signed a memorandum of understanding aimed at advancing basic AI research, as well as accelerating the kinds of scientific breakthroughs that could unlock the potential of AI to help solve some of the humanity’s greatest challenges.

Teacher Eric Xingchairman of MBZUAI, delivered brief remarks, as did Jonathan AdashekIBM Senior Vice President and Chief Communications Officer, and Saad TomaManaging Director, IBM Middle East, and Africa. The agreement was then signed by Sultan El HajiVice President of Public Affairs and Alumni Relations of MBZUAI and Wael Abdouchgeneral manager IBM Gulf and Levant.

“We are delighted to be among the first research universities in the MENA region to host a center of excellence for AI research and development with the technology and expertise of a world-leading technology giant. like IBM. This center will provide very valuable resources and a collaborative environment for our faculty and students to expand their work in the field of AI. IBM has a long history of technological innovation, and we look forward to joining their latest efforts in our region and jointly advance AI technology and commercialization for the common good,” said MBZUAI Chairman, Professor Eric Xing mentioned.

Saad TomaManaging Director, IBM Middle East and Africasaid, “This collaboration will help drive innovations in AI, which is essential for the future of business and society. We bring together some of the brightest minds in industry and academia, while reinforcing IBM’s commitment to promoting knowledge and skills in areas critical to the development of the UAE, where the use of technologies such that AI is fundamental.”

The central element of the collaboration is the creation of a new center of excellence in artificial intelligence which will be based on the Masdar City university campus. The Center will leverage the talents of IBM researchers, in collaboration with MBZUAI faculty and students, and will focus on advancing basic and applied research goals.

The initiative aims to develop, validate and incubate technologies that harness the capabilities of AI to address civic, social and business challenges. In addition, the collaboration aims to deliver real-world applications, particularly in the areas of natural language processing, as well as AI applications that aim to advance climate and sustainability goals, and accelerate discoveries in the field of health.

IBM will provide targeted training and technologies as part of the initiative, which supports the university’s vision to be a global leader in advancing AI and its application for the good of society and business. For example, through the IBM Academic Initiative, IBM will provide MBZUAI students and faculty with access to IBM tools, software, courseware, and cloud accounts for teaching, learning, and non-commercial research. Moreover, through the IBM Skills Academy program, MBZUAI will have access to curriculum, lectures, labs, industry use cases, design thinking sessions, and an AI Practitioner certification.

The contemplated relationship is subject to the conclusion of definitive agreements between the parties.

About IBM

IBM is a leading global provider of hybrid cloud and artificial intelligence and business services. We help clients in over 175 countries capitalize on insights from their data, streamline business processes, reduce costs and gain competitive advantage in their industries. Nearly 3,000 government entities and enterprises in critical infrastructure areas such as financial services, telecommunications and healthcare rely on IBM’s hybrid cloud platform and Red Hat OpenShift to drive their digital transformations quickly, efficiently and safely. IBM’s breakthrough innovations in artificial intelligence, quantum computing, industry-specific cloud solutions, and business services provide open and flexible options for our customers. It’s all backed by IBM’s legendary commitment to trust, transparency, accountability, inclusiveness and service. Visit www.ibm.com for more information.

About Mohamed bin Zayed University of Artificial Intelligence (MBZUAI)

MBZUAI is a graduate research university with a focus on artificial intelligence, computing and digital technologies across all industry sectors. The university aims to empower students, businesses, and governments to advance artificial intelligence as a global force for positive progress. MBZUAI offers various graduate programs designed to acquire advanced and specialized knowledge and skills in artificial intelligence, including computer vision, machine learning, and natural language processing. For more information, visit www.mbzuai.ac.ae

For press inquiries, please contact:




Nicolas Demille

Jumana Akkawi

Deputy Director of Communications at

Director of Communications, IBM Middle East

MBZUAI

and Africa and Central and Eastern Europe

[email protected]

[email protected]



Aya Sakouri


Communication Manager at MBZUAI


[email protected]




SOURCEIBM

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Dakota Nursing Program Graduate Students – Jamestown Sun https://endgradeinflation.org/dakota-nursing-program-graduate-students-jamestown-sun/ Mon, 23 May 2022 15:22:00 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/dakota-nursing-program-graduate-students-jamestown-sun/ The Dakota Nursing program at Dakota College in Bottineau last week named 36 associate applied science nursing graduates from its programs located on the Minot, Valley City and Bottineau campuses. There were 10 graduates in the Valley City class. Graduates from the Valley City campus are Kayla Rotondi, Ellendale; Wendy Couvert,Misty Miller, Mackenzie Clark, Josie […]]]>

The Dakota Nursing program at Dakota College in Bottineau last week named 36 associate applied science nursing graduates from its programs located on the Minot, Valley City and Bottineau campuses. There were 10 graduates in the Valley City class.

Graduates from the Valley City campus are Kayla Rotondi, Ellendale; Wendy Couvert,
Misty Miller, Mackenzie Clark, Josie Rudolph, Halee Frey and Christy Nannenga, all of Jamestown; Angela Larson, Valley City;
Alyssa Petersen, Oakes; and Gracie Neufeld, Rolla.

Dakota College at Bottineau’s practicum is a member of the Dakota Nursing Program, a consortium of four community college nursing departments that work together to offer a common curriculum for a Practical Nursing Certificate and an Associate of Applied Science in Nursing. The program aims to meet North Dakota’s growing need for nurses by offering these degree programs on the campuses of four two-year colleges and numerous satellite sites across the state.

The program works with medical centers across the state where students gain hands-on experience. Nurses who graduate in applied science will pass their National Council Licensure Examination exam to obtain a license to begin their career as a registered nurse.

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Nine Gophers With Men’s Basketball Ties Are Graduating This Spring https://endgradeinflation.org/nine-gophers-with-mens-basketball-ties-are-graduating-this-spring/ Sat, 21 May 2022 14:27:49 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/nine-gophers-with-mens-basketball-ties-are-graduating-this-spring/ Men’s basketball | 05/21/2022 09:25:00 History links The University of Minnesota men’s basketball team had nine current and alumni student-athletes who graduated in the past semester. The Golden Gophers had six current student-athletes and three alumni are graduating in May 2022. Eric Curry and Payton Willis both earned their bachelor’s […]]]>

Men’s basketball | 05/21/2022 09:25:00

The University of Minnesota men’s basketball team had nine current and alumni student-athletes who graduated in the past semester. The Golden Gophers had six current student-athletes and three alumni are graduating in May 2022.

Eric Curry and Payton Willis both earned their bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Minnesota. Curry now holds a bachelor’s degree in communications and a master’s degree in youth development and leadership. Willis added a bachelor’s degree in commerce last year and followed that up with his master’s in youth development and leadership last spring. Eylijah Stephens, Luc Loewe and Charlie Daniels both earned their bachelor’s degrees in their previous stops (Lafayette, William & Mary, and Stephen F. Austin). Stephens and Loewe earned a master’s degree in sports management, while Daniels added a master’s degree in youth development and leadership. Sean Sutherlin obtained his baccalaureate last May in sports management.

The Golden Gophers have had three alumni who have also received higher education honors. Andre Hollins (2012-15), who was a graduate director of Gopher for the past two years, earned his MBA from the Carlson School of Management and is expected to work at General Mills after graduation. Michael Hurt (2017-20) holds three degrees from the University of Minnesota. His most recent was also an MBA from Carlson in Business Administration.

Tommy Davis has shown that it’s never too late to graduate. Davis played for the Gophers from 1982 to 1985. Davis was drafted in the fifth round of the 1985 NBA draft and went on to go on to a successful playing and coaching career in France. However, he never graduated. Now in 2022 as part of the Gopher Grad program, Davis now has a Bachelor’s degree in Multidisciplinary Studies from the University of Minnesota which he earned in May 2022. Davis was also inducted into the M Club Hall of Fame last September.

Congratulations to all Gopher Connections for their recent accomplishments!

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Essex County students to graduate from prestigious New Jersey STEM program – Essex News Daily https://endgradeinflation.org/essex-county-students-to-graduate-from-prestigious-new-jersey-stem-program-essex-news-daily/ Thu, 19 May 2022 20:38:21 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/essex-county-students-to-graduate-from-prestigious-new-jersey-stem-program-essex-news-daily/ CHATHAM, NJ – On Saturday, May 21, Essex County residents Deborah McDougall and JéVanni Napoleon of East Orange; Elaina Mann, of Livingston; Leonard Jasper, of Maplewood; Julia Schanen, of Montclair; Achunike Okafor, of Newark; Alexandre Jean, of Verona; and Nathaniel Vinoya of West Orange will graduate from Governor’s STEM Scholars, a program of the Research […]]]>

CHATHAM, NJ – On Saturday, May 21, Essex County residents Deborah McDougall and JéVanni Napoleon of East Orange; Elaina Mann, of Livingston; Leonard Jasper, of Maplewood; Julia Schanen, of Montclair; Achunike Okafor, of Newark; Alexandre Jean, of Verona; and Nathaniel Vinoya of West Orange will graduate from Governor’s STEM Scholars, a program of the Research & Development Council of New Jersey. They are part of a class of 95 New Jersey high school and college students to complete the year-long program, which provides a 360-degree view of New Jersey’s STEM economy through lectures, lab tours, master classes and research.

Public-private partnership between the New Jersey Research and Development Council, the Governor’s Office, the New Jersey Department of Education, the Secretary of Higher Education, and public and private research corporations, STEM Scholars from governor offer high performing high schools, colleges. and graduate students with a comprehensive introduction to the state’s STEM economy. Scholars are a diverse and representative group of student leaders from across the Garden State who excel in STEM and want to pursue STEM-related majors and careers.

“This weekend, the Governor’s STEM Scholars will graduate 95 of New Jersey’s most promising STEM students,” said program director Alise Roderer. “As Governor’s STEM Scholars, these students received a comprehensive introduction to New Jersey’s STEM economy, highlighting some of the state’s most innovative and exciting STEM organizations through lectures, tours of field, internship opportunities and a research project.”

“With more scientists and engineers per square mile than anywhere else in the world, New Jersey has one of the most educated workforces in the country and is a national center for STEM research,” Anthony said. Cicatiello, president of the Research & Development Council of New Jersey. . “By 2027, STEM jobs are expected to grow 9% in New Jersey. The Governor’s STEM Scholars introduce the state’s best and brightest STEM students to businesses, professionals, research, and STEM opportunities available in the Garden State.Through the Governor’s STEM Scholars, we ensure our state’s talented students stay in New Jersey to fill these roles, securing our academic and workforce pipeline for the future.

Throughout the academic year, scholars participated in four conferences highlighting New Jersey’s STEM opportunities in government, academia, and industry. Each researcher was led by a college-level team leader, mentored by professional STEM advisors, and produced a viable research project.

McDougall and Napoleon are juniors at East Orange STEM Academy; Mann is a senior at Livingston High School; Jasper is a senior at Columbia High School; Schanen is a senior at Lycée Montclair; Okafor is a junior at Science Park High School; Jean is in high school in Verona; and Vinoya is a freshman at Rutgers University – New Brunswick.

As Governor STEM Scholars graduates, students will have access to the Governor’s STEM Scholars Alumni Network of nearly 600 students, allowing them to stay connected with STEM jobs and opportunities within the state. .

Applications for the Governor’s STEM Scholarship Program 2022-2023 are open through June 10. For more information, visit www.govstemscholars.com/apply/.

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Anna Fish Receives Bob McCloskey Insurance Big South Conference Graduate Scholarship https://endgradeinflation.org/anna-fish-receives-bob-mccloskey-insurance-big-south-conference-graduate-scholarship/ Tue, 17 May 2022 19:27:54 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/anna-fish-receives-bob-mccloskey-insurance-big-south-conference-graduate-scholarship/ History links CHARLOTTE, NC — Gardner-Webb, women’s soccer star anna fish received the annual Bob McCloskey Insurance Big South Conference Graduate Scholarship, the league office announced today. Bob McCloskey Insurance, a Big South business partner, will award Fish $2,000 for his higher education on Wednesday evening, June 1, as part of the […]]]>

CHARLOTTE, NC — Gardner-Webb, women’s soccer star anna fish received the annual Bob McCloskey Insurance Big South Conference Graduate Scholarship, the league office announced today.

Bob McCloskey Insurance, a Big South business partner, will award Fish $2,000 for his higher education on Wednesday evening, June 1, as part of the conference’s annual Spring Awards Dinner Banquet at the Westin Resort in Hilton Head. , SC

The Big South Conference Graduate Scholarship Program was established by the league in the fall of 2005 to recognize academic excellence by Big South Conference student-athletes who intend to pursue higher education. postgraduate after graduating from a Big South Conference institution.

Fish started all 18 games last season and played 1,506 minutes on the field for the Runnin’ Bulldogs. His only point of the season was an assist in GWU’s 5-0 victory over South Carolina State on September 26. Fish has started all 48 games she has played at Gardner-Webb since joining the team in 2019 and has recorded 4,183 minutes of career action. She helped the Runnin’ Bulldogs reach the Big South Women’s Soccer Championship game in 2019, in addition to recording an assist in the 2021 spring season against Charleston Southern. Fish will pursue her master’s degree in physiology at North Carolina State University in the fall.

While in college, Fish earned Dean’s List honors every year, in addition to the Transfer Provost Scholarship. She earned a 3.58 GPA in biology with a concentration in biomedical sciences and was a member of the Tri Beta National Biological Honor Society. Fish served as Chair of the Gardner-Webb Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) from 2020-22 and was a member of SAAC each season as an undergraduate. Additionally, she has served as Senior Class SGA Vice President, FCA Vice President, and Gardner-Webb Award recipient. Pam Scruggs Leadership and Service Award. Fish has also spent time volunteering with local organizations such as Feeding Kids Cleveland County, Shelby Baptist Missions Camp, Miracle Hill Ministries, and Paladin Power & Speed, as well as working regularly with children with developmental disabilities.

Fish joins Hombre Kennedy of the Charleston Southern football team as one of two Big South student-athletes to win this year’s graduate scholarship. Other finalists included High Point female golfer Sarah Kahn, USC Upstate volleyball player Mackenzie Marcum, Winthrop female lacrosse player Molly Dankowski, Gardner-Webb male track and field athlete Chase Thornhill and Winthrop baseball player Jonathan Strauss.

“Bob McCloskey Insurance is once again honored to be able to continue our tradition as a proud corporate partner of the Deep South by awarding these scholarships to these excellent student-athletes who are clearly outstanding ambassadors for the Deep South,” said Rob McCloskey. . “We wish them both much success in the future.”

Nominations for the graduate scholarship are made by the faculty athletics representative or director of studies at a member institution in the Deep South, and are limited to one male and one female from each school. To be eligible for the Big South Conference Graduate Scholarship, applicants must meet the following requirements:

  • Have an overall undergraduate grade point average of 3,500 or higher based on a maximum of 4,000, or the equivalent in other recognized grading systems;
  • Have competed in intercollegiate athletics as a member of a varsity team at a Big South Conference member institution;
  • Must either be a senior graduating in the academic year of the award or be enrolled in a graduate program at a Big South Conference institution while completing the final year of eligibility;
  • Intend to continue their education beyond the bachelor’s degree and enroll in a graduate program at an accredited non-profit educational institution or a post-baccalaureate professional degree program at a school of law, medical school or equivalent, without restriction as to the national location of the institution;
  • Have demonstrated superior character and superior leadership;
  • Have demonstrated that participation in athletics and community service has had a positive influence on the candidate’s personal and intellectual development. Relative success in athletics is important but not of paramount importance;
  • Enroll in a graduate program the term following the award of the scholarship or present justification for deferred enrollment.

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Wolverines awarded four in all-conference team https://endgradeinflation.org/wolverines-awarded-four-in-all-conference-team/ Sun, 15 May 2022 17:36:07 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/wolverines-awarded-four-in-all-conference-team/ Jessica Schoonbee, right; Kate Burns, second from right; Grace Collins, third from right; and Charlotte Powers, center (Michigan Photography) Wolverines awarded four in all-conference team 05/15/2022 1:34:00 PM // Chad Shepard ROSEMONT, Ill. –The No. 6-ranked University of Michigan rowing program saw four student-athletes named to the All-Big Ten Conference team following their second-place finish […]]]>

Jessica Schoonbee, right; Kate Burns, second from right; Grace Collins, third from right; and Charlotte Powers, center (Michigan Photography)

Wolverines awarded four in all-conference team

05/15/2022 1:34:00 PM

// Chad Shepard

ROSEMONT, Ill. –The No. 6-ranked University of Michigan rowing program saw four student-athletes named to the All-Big Ten Conference team following their second-place finish at the Big Ten Championships on Sunday, May 15, the league announced . Graduate students Grace Collins and kate burns received first-team honors while seniors Jessica Schoonbee and graduate student coxswain Charlotte Powers were named second-team winners.

Collins earned All-Big Ten honors last spring (second team), but for the others, it marks their first all-conference recognition. Schoonbee had previously been named Big Ten Freshman of the Year in 2019.

The four athletes are part of UM’s first varsity eight (1V8) boat that won Big Ten silver on Sunday as the team scored 174 points to finish in second place at the Big Ten championships. These winners were part of a historic run in the program‘s history with two Big Ten tag team titles and two NCAA top-five finishes during their competitive years.

Burns calls Ann Abor home, and the local native was a varsity rower throughout her Michigan career. An essential member of the team on and off the water, she has largely occupied the fifth through seventh seats in the 1V8 this year, settling in to the sixth seat for the conference regatta. Burns won Big Ten gold (twice) and silver (twice) every year during his career; one gold and one silver in 1V8 and 2V8 models. She also won a bronze medal at the NCAA championships with the 2V8 (2021). She was a three-time All-Big Ten Academic selection and a two-time CRCA Athlete Scholar. Burns holds a degree in industrial and operations engineering and is currently pursuing a master’s degree in the same field at UM.

Collins has been an essential member of the most successful boats throughout his career. This season she has rowed between seats three and seven – up and down the range – but was in the fifth seat on Sunday. The Ridgefield, Connecticut native has been in two Big Ten gold medal boats (1V8, 2019, 21) and two silver medal boats (1V8, 2022; 2V4, 2018). A freshman NCAA substitute, Collins became one of the team’s top scorers and captured NCAA Bronze with the 1V8 (2019). She was chosen as an All-America nominee in the pandemic-shortened 2020 season, and was a CRCA athlete-scholar and two-time All-Big Ten academic winner. Collins earned her degree in Applied Exercise Science.

Schoonbee was named Big Ten Freshman of the Year after her rookie season in 2019 in the same seat she now occupies: the racing seat of 1V8. She’s been the rhythm and pacemaker for the team’s best boat all spring, and the key to their top speed. Schoonbee helped Boat to B1G gold in 2019 and went on to win a bronze medal at the NCAA Championships this spring. She was an All-America nominee in the modified COVID-19 season and was also an All-Big Ten academic winner. Schoonbee has also enjoyed international success, having won a silver medal at the Under-23 World Championships for his native South Africa.

A 1V8 helmsman throughout his Michigan career, Powers was the secret ingredient to the Wolverines’ best boat success. She helped guide the boat to an NCAA bronze medal in 2018 and in the Big Ten stage she won two gold medals (2019, ’21) and a silver medal (2018) with the 1V8. In addition to her conference success, Powers has been nationally recognized: She was a two-time Pocock All-American (2019, ’21) and in the pandemic-cancelled 2020 season, was named an All-American winner. -America.

Senior Lilian Mei was named the winner of the team’s sportsmanship award. A two-time CRCA athlete-scholar and All-Big Ten academic winner (2020-21), she was part of two Big Ten gold medal boats in the 1V4 (2019, ’21). Mei is originally from San Ramon, California. Majoring in mechanical engineering, Mei will enroll in UM’s master of engineering program in the fall.

The Wolverines will wait until the NCAA draft show on Tuesday, May 17 to find out their official fate. The team’s solid performance throughout the season bodes well for their likely inclusion in the overall squad. The team will continue preparations for the NCAA Championships, which take place May 27-29 in Sarasota, Fla. UM hopes to compete in the Championship Regatta for the 14th consecutive time and 22nd time overall.

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5 senior star athletes share their stories https://endgradeinflation.org/5-senior-star-athletes-share-their-stories/ Fri, 13 May 2022 19:25:33 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/5-senior-star-athletes-share-their-stories/ 5 senior star athletes share their stories By Kennedy RyanMay 13, 2022 The life of a student-athlete is a balance between daily training and weekly trips to games, in addition to studies and socializing. To do this successfully for four years or more takes determination, dedication and discipline. With Beginnings Around the Corner, five graduates […]]]>

5 senior star athletes share their stories

By Kennedy RyanMay 13, 2022

The life of a student-athlete is a balance between daily training and weekly trips to games, in addition to studies and socializing.

To do this successfully for four years or more takes determination, dedication and discipline.

With Beginnings Around the Corner, five graduates who have stood out – on and off the field – shared what made it all work for them and what they look forward to in the future.

Photo/Mike Lovett

Juliette Carreiro ’22 takes the field

Focus and become a leader

Juliette Carreiro ’22, a double major in biology and psychology, has been playing football for as long as she can remember.

“I joined my first team when I was four, but even before that I could be found playing football with my family,” Carreiro said.

During her four years at Brandeis, she accumulated her accomplishments in the classroom and on the field.

Along with being chosen as a 2021 Athlete All-American and Academic All-American, nominations for a number of student-athletes nationwide, Carreiro held a 4.0 GPA throughout her four years at Brandeis. . She contributes her success to her busy routine.

“Having a busy schedule kept me focused,” Carreiro said. “Being dedicated to both schoolwork and athletics – these two have worked hand-in-hand in my success.”

After graduating and taking a gap year, Carreiro plans to enroll in medical school.

Although she still has a class to complete in the fall to graduate, Carreiro will walk early this spring.

With the NCAA granting an additional year of eligibility to all Division III student-athletes who missed a season due to COVID-19, it will also be able to complete another football season on campus.

She is delighted to play one last season, but is especially looking forward to seeing her teammates succeed in the next games.

“I have known many of these players for almost five years now. As captain this year, my goal was to motivate everyone in every game,” said Carreiro. “I’m really excited to keep coming back and see what the team can accomplish.”

Erin Magil

Photo/Mike Lovett

Run across countries

Erin Magill, a double major in Linguistics and French and Francophone Studies, started running when she was 9 years old. Since then, she has fallen in love with him. She chose Brandeis because of its linguistics program, campus size, and cross-country team.

“I wanted to compete with a Division III team,” Magill said. “While researching the schools, I found that Brandeis had a team that ranked highly on the national rosters.”

While at Brandeis, she balanced her schoolwork with her dream – developing enough speed to qualify for national championships.

“The seven fastest members of the team are racing at nationals,” Magill said. “In my first year at Brandeis, I was the 8th. I was able to make it to the nationals, but I looked sideways. After that, it became a goal for me to compete.

As a senior, she finally got the opportunity. She placed well at the National Cross Country Championships, receiving All-American honors for finishing in the top 40 at the Division III Nationals.

Along with running his way to Nationals, Magill held a 4.0 GPA throughout his four years at Brandeis. Balancing classes with athletics can be difficult, but something Magill confidently pursued due to her passion for running.

“I can balance both studies and athletics because running is what I enjoy the most in my day-to-day life. I can’t wait to go to training and work towards my goal”, said Magill “For me, I don’t see racing as a job.”

After graduation, Magill plans to teach English in France. There is no doubt in his mind that running will always be part of his routine.

“I don’t see myself giving up running anytime soon,” she said.

Pretty Fujita

Photo/Mike Lovett

Pretty Fujita in her element

Exceed expectations and embrace a new chapter

Jolie Fujita, from Honolulu, Hawaii, will complete her Brandeis experience with an undergraduate degree in commerce and a master’s degree in international finance and economics with a concentration in marketing.

She chose to attend Brandeis due to the warm reception of the softball team when she visited campus.

“I wanted to be close to Boston because it’s my mom’s favorite city,” Fujita said. “After meeting the team, I knew I wanted to be here. I didn’t know what I wanted to specialize in, but I was confident in my choice because of the options available to Brandeis.

Starting at shortstop, Fujita helped the team qualify for the NCAA Division III Tournament for the first time in a decade. After moving to regionals in 2019, the team returned in 2021 as the first team in Brandeis history to return to compete in consecutive seasons.

“It was amazing, exceeding everyone’s expectations,” Fujiita said. “I truly believe we changed Brandeis softball forever by showing people that we can be great.”

In addition to making team history, Fujita was selected to the All-University Athletic Association and awarded the National Fastpitch Coaches Association All-America Scholar-Athlete in 2021 for academic excellence. She found her academics to thrive during the softball season.

“It’s really funny…a lot of us find that we do better in school during the season,” Fujita said. “We had limited free time, so we had to maximize every second of the day. It allowed us to stay focused.

After graduation, Fujita hopes to work in the advertising industry at Hill Holiday in Boston. She plans to continue playing recreational softball in a league this summer in Honolulu, but is looking forward to exploring a new time in her life with different hobbies.

“Softball has been central to my whole life,” she said. “Maybe I will become a boxer! Maybe I’ll try bungee jumping.

Mike Khoury

Photo/Mike Lovett

Draw skills from the field

Mike Khoury ’21 completed his undergraduate degree in American Studies with a minor in business in the spring of 2021, but did not have the opportunity to participate in his final baseball season. Like Carreiro, he enjoyed an extra year of eligibility due to COVID-19.

Khoury returned to Brandeis to pursue a master’s degree in project and program management from the graduate program while playing a final season on the men’s baseball team.

It was an impressive season. Khoury was selected as the National College Baseball Association’s Division III National Hitter of the Week in March. His greatest joy, however, was returning to the field with his teammates.

“Family is the biggest word that comes to mind when I think of the team,” Khoury said. “I’ve met some of my closest friends through baseball.”

Khoury hopes to work in the consulting industry after graduation. He doesn’t know if he will continue to play baseball, but he knows his skills translate beyond the field.

“Being a team player and managing a busy schedule taught me skills that I will take with me,” he said. “I know I’ll be ready for any schedule in the professional world.”

Preparing for the future as a team player

Nolan Hagerty came to Brandeis to play basketball, but that was only part of the reason for the double major in psychology and philosophy with a minor in legal studies.

“I chose Brandeis because I wanted to find one of the best psychology programs near me,” said the Yarmouth, Maine native. “I knew I wanted to prepare for graduate school.”

Having played basketball since the age of three, Hagerty joined the basketball team and quickly found it to be his home away from home. The team spent time together on and off the field, playing intramural softball and studying together in their spare time.

“We are all very close,” he said. “We are very competitive and serious on the pitch, but we are clumsy everywhere else.”

He completed his basketball experience at Brandeis with an honorable mention in the All-UAA selection.

After graduation, Hagerty plans to spend a year working in a psychological hospital before applying to doctoral programs in clinical psychology. His experience on the Brandeis basketball team came in handy during his job interviews.

“I’ve mentioned basketball many times in interviews for the roles I’m applying for,” he said. “When you’re part of a team, you have to learn to work together towards a common goal. Workplaces are definitely looking for people who are team players. »

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Teens graduate from Nashville anti-gang program, alternative to juvenile court https://endgradeinflation.org/teens-graduate-from-nashville-anti-gang-program-alternative-to-juvenile-court/ Thu, 12 May 2022 03:39:11 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/teens-graduate-from-nashville-anti-gang-program-alternative-to-juvenile-court/ NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — It’s graduation season in Middle Tennessee, but Wednesday night wasn’t your typical college students. Instead of academics, these teenagers were honored for their commitment against gang violence in Nashville. Although you didn’t see the typical cap and robe or a president or director, you could hear every name being called. “We’re […]]]>

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — It’s graduation season in Middle Tennessee, but Wednesday night wasn’t your typical college students. Instead of academics, these teenagers were honored for their commitment against gang violence in Nashville.

Although you didn’t see the typical cap and robe or a president or director, you could hear every name being called.

“We’re going to be graduating from the GANG and GIFT program,” said Deona Lavender, one of 10 teenage girls to graduate from the program.

GANG, which stands for “Gentleman and not Gangsters”, has been operating for years, with the “Growing in Faith Together” (GIFT) succeeding in partnership with it. Students like Lavender say it’s a great alternative to what she would do with her life.

“Fighting, lots of fighting,” Lavender said. “I’ve always thought that I always have to react to things, but being here has taught me that there will always be things that will try to stop me from getting to bigger things. I have to ignore that.

The programs are another option for high-risk gang-related teens, hoping to show them a different life.

“It feels good to know there are people like me out there,” Lavender said. “I’m glad I took this program. I’m glad I got to experience something that other people may not be able to experience.

Bishop Marcus Campbell, the senior pastor of Mount Carmel Baptist Church, leads the program and says it is easy to fall into a life of violence and explained that many of these teenagers feel like joining a gang is all they have, but thanks to the program they are taught differently, with some even forming a second family.

“Our whole tagline for GANG and GIFT is if we can change your mind, we can change your grind. So to see them handle situations differently, make better decisions about who they want to hang around, start thinking about college or a trade or whatever they can do,” Bishop Campbell said.

The programs link up with the juvenile justice system. At Wednesday night’s ceremony, Judge Shelia Callaway was present. Bishop Campbell says these types of initiatives are needed more than ever as youth crime continues to wreak havoc.

“Between 13 and I might as well say 19 is very important to get them under control before they hit 20, because then a lot of times we lose them. We lose them between the ages of 13 and 20, and we just try to steer them in the right direction and keep them from going down the wrong path,” Bishop Campbell said.

⏩ Find more Top Stories at wkrn.com

In order to graduate, each student must continuously attend weekly classes at the church. Programs feature hands-on sessions and include field trips to local colleges, so teens can see what their future could be. A lot of the initiatives are run through donations, if you want to donate you can do so on their website.

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Ukrainian students and scholars fleeing the war begin their studies at Israeli universities https://endgradeinflation.org/ukrainian-students-and-scholars-fleeing-the-war-begin-their-studies-at-israeli-universities/ Tue, 10 May 2022 11:28:18 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/ukrainian-students-and-scholars-fleeing-the-war-begin-their-studies-at-israeli-universities/ Israeli universities are stepping in to absorb Ukrainian students whose studies have been interrupted by the ongoing war. The vast majority are women; most Ukrainian men between the ages of 18 and 60 are forced to stay at home to be called up for military service if necessary. Nineteen students and researchers continue their work […]]]>

Israeli universities are stepping in to absorb Ukrainian students whose studies have been interrupted by the ongoing war.

The vast majority are women; most Ukrainian men between the ages of 18 and 60 are forced to stay at home to be called up for military service if necessary.

Nineteen students and researchers continue their work at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in the southern city of Beersheba.

“I was forced to leave Ukraine because I was very scared for my life,” said Viktoria Taranik, who expressed her gratitude to the university for hosting her.

“My mother works under contract as a border guard on the border with Poland and she can no longer leave the country due to the difficult military situation,” she said.

“My grandparents are in the Donetsk region [in eastern Ukraine]an area where fighting has been going on since 2014. I am very worried about my mother and my grandparents,” she said.

Tel Aviv University, which set up an emergency scholarship fund for Ukrainian graduate students in early March, has taken in seven Ukrainian graduate students, all women.

Viktoriia Taranik (center) from Lutsk, Ukraine, is a bachelor’s student in international relations at Lesya Ukrainka Volyn National University. She is currently at Ben Gurion University in Beersheba, southern Israel, where she is participating in the semester program and enrolling in courses in political science, history and Israel studies. Right: Lior Rosenthal Almoznino, Director of the Visa and Health Insurance Unit. Left: Lila Perlman-Sophie, director of international and non-degree exchanges. (Danny Machlis, Ben Gurion University of the Negev)

Originally from different Ukrainian cities, they continue their studies in law, medicine, psychology, music and linguistics.

“I managed to talk to my family yesterday, but today the connection was cut off and I couldn’t reach them,” said Alisa, a graduate law student who is studying crisis management at TAU. . She comes from a small town near Mariupol in eastern Ukraine, an area that has suffered the most violent fighting and destruction.

Marina, a law student, was enrolled at the Ukrainian State Pedagogical University in Kropyvnytskyi, a central city which she said was quite safe at the moment.

But university premises have been converted into accommodation for people fleeing more dangerous areas, and lectures are only held online and are sporadic.

“I was supposed to graduate in June,” Marina said, “but for now, I’m just happy to be able to continue my education here at TAU.”

Earlier this month, the women sold products they had made during a two-day event and raised more than $5,000, enough to buy 86 first aid kits and 24 pairs of military boots .

At Bar-Ilan University in Ramat Gan, central Israel, four members of Ukraine’s world championship math team are already settling in, and six more are waiting to join them as soon as their papers have been completed. All are between 14 and 18 years old.

The coaches of the Israeli math team have heard of the fate of their rivals and have arranged for them to move and study at university for the foreseeable future.

“One moment all my academic hopes were cut short because of the war, and the next day I start university studies at 16 in Israel,” said Boris Holikov from Dnipro, Ukraine’s fourth largest city. “I took the opportunity almost straight away, because I know I won’t regret it.”

Leonid Diachenko, 14, from Kyiv, said: “My mother took me all the way to Poland, but then I had to say goodbye. It was really hard to say goodbye to my mother because I don’t know when I will see her. It could be a long time and I think a lot about the safety of all my family, but I have to live with it.

Ukrainian students pictured with Israeli math team coach Aleksandr Tolesnikov. (Bar-Ilan University Spokesperson’s Office)

Over the past few weeks, the Bar-Ilan International School, led by Executive Director Ofer Dahan, has been arranging visas and accommodation and preparing an interdisciplinary academic program tailored to student needs.

“By October, the young people will take courses in mathematics, computer science and physics, and will also learn Hebrew. They will receive college credits and some of the students are expected to move on to the bachelor’s degree in October,” said Bar-Ilan CEO Zohar Yinon.

Under a separate stream, Bar-Ilan received about 50 applications from Ukrainian university students and researchers seeking admission. Thirteen of the 50 have already been absorbed and more are expected to arrive soon.

Meanwhile, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem has accepted 18 Ukrainian students, 10 of whom have already arrived.

One, Dr Anastasiia Zinevych, recalled how buildings shook at the Odessa National Economic University where she was teaching when bombs fell, severely damaging a nearby airport.

She and her husband decided to leave Ukraine with its “supermarket shelves empty of food and pharmacies without medicine”.

Dr Anastasia Zinevych. (Tali Aronsky/Hebrew University)

“All we took with us were two laptops and a copy of my husband’s poetry,” she said.

Needing medical attention, the couple chose Israel because they had “heard good things about Hadassah Ein Kerem Hospital at Hebrew University.”

Zinev, who lives in a university-affiliated apartment, currently works with Professor Ran Hassin at HU’s Center for the Study of Rationality.

Of the other nine Ukrainian refugees, several undergraduates are continuing their studies at HU’s Rothberg International School, while several professors have joined the departments of psychology, sociology, history, Jewish studies, computer science and Agriculture of HU.

In addition, three researchers have arrived at the University of Haifa and other research students are expected to arrive in the coming days.

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“Live in your own present,” says SIUE graduate at start https://endgradeinflation.org/live-in-your-own-present-says-siue-graduate-at-start/ Sun, 08 May 2022 19:35:15 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/live-in-your-own-present-says-siue-graduate-at-start/ Southern Illinois University Edwardsville held commencement drills in the Vadalabene Center’s first community arena Friday and Saturday with ceremonies honoring thousands of eligible graduates. Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Denise Cobb, PhD, conferred degrees on graduates of the Graduate School, as well as business schools; Feeding with milk; and Education, Health and Human […]]]>

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville held commencement drills in the Vadalabene Center’s first community arena Friday and Saturday with ceremonies honoring thousands of eligible graduates.

Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Denise Cobb, PhD, conferred degrees on graduates of the Graduate School, as well as business schools; Feeding with milk; and Education, Health and Human Behavior Friday. She also led the Saturday graduation for the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) and the School of Engineering (SOE) on Saturday.


At Saturday’s 9 a.m. ceremony, CAS student speaker Josie Pauley, who earned a bachelor’s degree in applied studies in communications, encouraged graduates to live in the present and make the most of every moment.

“Live in your own present,” she said. “Once we master the process of living in the present and focusing on ourselves, the possibilities around us are truly endless.”

After stepping into the beginning stage 50 or more years ago, the Gold graduates of the Class of 2022 have been honored. Cobb referred to the speech given by U.S. Senator Charles H. Percy at the opening ceremony of the Golden Graduates in June 1972.

“I would like to read you a few excerpts from his speech, which are still relevant today,” Cobb said. “Remember, the most precious gift you have is the right to be a free citizen in a free society. Use that freedom to participate, shape, influence and matter to the fullest. Much of my faith in the he future of our country stems from my belief that you will maintain your commitment to participate and encourage others to participate.

Elizabeth Semande was the student speaker at the CAS noon ceremony. Semande earned a bachelor’s degree in geography and anthropology. After graduating, she will complete an internship in geospatial analysis at Maxar Technologies.

“Over the past four years, I can definitely say my life has changed,” she said. “All of our people have. The world has changed before we were ready for it. We’ve had to persevere and adapt more times than we can count. We’ve proven that we can persevere through tough times and keep going. to move forward towards our goals. I am confident that we will succeed and create a positive future for ourselves and others by becoming engaged global citizens through our hard work, kindness, creativity, innovation, inclusion and our love of learning.

At the 4 p.m. SOE ceremony, Dean Cem Karacal, PhD, recognized the school‘s dual degree programs with Istanbul Technical University and Changshu Institute of Technology, which offer students from Turkey and South Korea the opportunity to study for two years in the United States.

Madison House earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical and computer engineering and represented SOE graduates as a student speaker.

“This class can achieve anything we want, and we can use our creative and innovative ideas, technology skills, and strategic management abilities to build a better future,” House said. “Graduate friends, never stop putting one foot in front of the other, because your story isn’t over yet. This is just the beginning of an incredible journey ahead.

House got a job as an associate electrical engineer at the Callaway Nuclear Generating Station with Ameren Missouri. She will pursue a master’s degree in electrical and computer engineering at SIUE.

At 9 a.m. Friday, Colin Boysen was the student speaker at the School of Business ceremony. Boysen was an active member of several student organizations, taking on leadership roles and recruiting new members. When the pandemic hit, Boysen led the development of the Cougar Connectors peer mentorship program to support freshmen. Then, he will continue his law studies at the Chicago-Kent College of Law.

“Your degree represents your courage and determination to succeed despite a pandemic,” Boysen said. “Before you lies an uncertain world. What does it mean to get a business degree in 2022? It means you have proven that you can adapt and overcome. You are prepared for changes and will succeed in the business world despite all the obstacles ahead. The future awaits you. Congratulations!”

During the School of Nursing noon ceremony, awards were presented to Demarco Brownlee and Kaylie Rhoades for their student leadership. Tami Tutor was recognized for her outstanding contributions to community service.

Student lecturer James Clancy received a doctorate in nursing practice through the Nurse Anesthesia program. Clancy graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from SIUE in 2015 and worked as a registered nurse in both a cardiothoracic intensive care unit and a children’s emergency department before returning to pursue her doctoral studies. He will begin his career as a nurse anesthetist with South County Anesthesia Associates at Mercy Hospital South in St. Louis.

“We have all spent countless hours studying, undergone numerous exams, and provided high-quality patient care during clinical rotations,” Clancy said. “You’ve done all of this to establish yourself as one of the most trusted professionals in the world.”

The University honored Distinguished Service Award recipient Shirley Portwood, PhD, at its 4 p.m. ceremony for all graduates of the graduate school. Portwood is Professor Emeritus of History at SIUE, a longtime educator, and a former member of the SIU Board of Trustees.

“I am honored to receive this Distinguished Service Award,” said Portwood. “I thank those who have mentored and supported me over the years, including my family and parents, who insisted that all of their children go to college and become professionals.”

“Much of my service has been inspired by the examples I have seen growing up in various communities,” she continued. “From an early age, we learned the importance of community. Each helped the other without expecting reciprocity. We didn’t know the term “pay it forward” at the time, but we did. Reinforced experiences at the SIUE which make him advance the ideology. The faculty encouraged me to rise higher than I had originally planned. My service has been defined by those who have surrounded, nurtured and inspired me.

Now a three-time SIUE graduate, student speaker Charity Eugea has earned a doctorate in educational leadership. Eugea is a school district administrator for Sparta Community Unit.

“Perspective is a powerful tool,” she said. “It can be the lens through which we see the glass half empty or half full, the partly cloudy or partly sunny sky, or as a chance to fail or succeed. As graduate students, we learned to question our way of thinking, to go beyond our understanding of facts, and to truly understand the power of perspective.

Friday’s series of ceremonies ended with a celebration of the graduates of the School of Education, Health and Human Behaviour.

During the ceremony, Cobb awarded a Doctor of Humane Letters to Henry L. Roediger III, PhD, an honor given to individuals who have had a profound impact on SIUE. He is the James S. McDonnell Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Washington. Roediger, a world-renowned cognitive scientist, has studied human learning and memory for the past 50 years.

Carmen Cornejo, who is earning a bachelor’s degree in elementary education, was the student lecturer. Now, Cornejo will begin teaching fifth grade at Maplewood Richmond Heights Elementary in St. Louis while pursuing a master’s degree in education at SIUE.

All ceremonies were streamed live on siue.edu/tv.

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