Graduate Program – End Grade Inflation http://endgradeinflation.org/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 02:45:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://endgradeinflation.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Graduate Program – End Grade Inflation http://endgradeinflation.org/ 32 32 UMass Lowell to train students in protection https://endgradeinflation.org/umass-lowell-to-train-students-in-protection/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 02:03:37 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/umass-lowell-to-train-students-in-protection/ LOWELL, Mass. – UMass Lowell professors pool their expertise to train young engineers, scientists and policy makers to protect endangered water resources. Led by Associate Professor of Plastics Engineering Meg Sobkowicz-Kline and Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering Chris Hansen, the team received nearly $ 3 million from the National Science Foundation to create the Sustainable […]]]>

LOWELL, Mass. – UMass Lowell professors pool their expertise to train young engineers, scientists and policy makers to protect endangered water resources.

Led by Associate Professor of Plastics Engineering Meg Sobkowicz-Kline and Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering Chris Hansen, the team received nearly $ 3 million from the National Science Foundation to create the Sustainable Water Innovations in Materials – Mentoring program. , Education and Research (SWIMMER) at UMass Lowell. The initiative is one of 23 projects to receive a share of $ 64 million in funding from the National Science Foundation’s research internship program under the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021.

The program will train 60 UMass Lowell Masters and Doctorates. students to develop sustainable materials and chemicals that will reduce damage to water resources. Participants will be graduate students in plastic, mechanical, chemical, civil and environmental engineering; as well as chemistry; Earth Science; biology; public health; economy; and other disciplines.

UMass Lowell faculty members leading the project are expanding its program and hope to launch SWIMMER with a dozen students next fall. Participants will continue their graduate studies in the fields of their choice, while also working in several disciplines with other members of the team.

The program will include a preparatory training camp, a two-semester core course and team-building projects. Participants will also complete an internship hosted by partner organizations, such as the Merrimack River Watershed Council, or with a company affiliated with the Green Chemistry and Commerce Council, of which UMass Lowell professor of public health, Joel Tickner, is executive director.

At the Tsongas Industrial History Center, SWIMMER researchers will learn how past pollution of the Merrimack River led to health crises in Lowell. The Merrimack now provides drinking water to approximately 500,000 people in five communities in Massachusetts, including Lowell, and several communities in New Hampshire.

“They will see how healthy the river was in the past, what it is in the present and how to hopefully prevent pollution in the future,” said Hansen. “We don’t want all student training to be done only at UMass Lowell or just with their research faculty. The idea is to have real world engagement.

Participants will also address issues such as ‘chemicals forever’ including polyfluoroalkyls (PFAS) in water supplies and how droughts, in the United States and around the world, affect water resources.

“It’s a relevant topic that applies to their lives,” he said. “They can be an agent of change, an agent of good in the world.”

Along with Sobkowicz-Kline, Hansen and Tickner, other UMass Lowell faculty members who will help train participants include Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering Sheree Pagsuyoin, Assistant Professor of Chemistry James Reuther, the Professor of Environmental and Atmospheric Sciences Juliette Rooney-Varga, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences Frederic Chain, Associate Professor of Economics David Kingsley and Greg Morose, Research Director at the Use Reduction Institute toxic substances from UMass Lowell.

“There are many diverse research topics in the area of ​​water-material interactions that students can borrow in different ways,” Sobkowicz-Kline said. “We are grateful to have professors here at UMass Lowell who can successfully advance this.”

To ensure the program includes the talents of a diverse group of students, the initiative will also recruit graduate students from Prairie View A&M University and the University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez. Both universities are considered institutions serving minorities by the US Department of Education.

Hansen and Sobkowicz-Kline said it is essential to develop graduates who not only have the STEM skills required for innovative solutions, but who are also sensitive to society’s needs for environmental justice and inclusive decision-making.

“It’s just a fact that minority communities in America are disproportionately affected by pollution and resource degradation,” Hansen said.

Hansen hopes that the SWIMMER program can serve as a springboard for the careers of participating students, whether in industry, in a startup, in a non-profit organization, in the public service or in the classroom as an educator.

“We want them to form lifelong partnerships and collaborations with the other people in their cohort, and we want them to translate that into amazing research that becomes known nationally and internationally,” he said. declared. “And then eventually, when they graduate, they do something that no one else really has that skill to do.”

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UMass Lowell is a national research university located on a high-energy campus at the heart of a global community. The university offers its students bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in business, education, engineering, fine arts, health, humanities, sciences and social sciences. UMass Lowell offers high-quality educational programs, vigorous hands-on learning, and personal attention from top faculty and staff, which prepare all graduates to become leaders in their communities and around the world. www.uml.edu


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OHIO seniors can take spring courses and earn graduate credit for a master’s degree in law, justice and culture https://endgradeinflation.org/ohio-seniors-can-take-spring-courses-and-earn-graduate-credit-for-a-masters-degree-in-law-justice-and-culture/ Mon, 18 Oct 2021 20:47:02 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/ohio-seniors-can-take-spring-courses-and-earn-graduate-credit-for-a-masters-degree-in-law-justice-and-culture/ Spring 2015 students on Shankill Road in Northern Ireland. Ohio University students can now apply for the LLM program in Law, Justice, and Culture and begin graduate school in the spring, take postgraduate courses, and quickly start a one-year Masters. Undergraduate students who are accepted into the master’s program are, under certain circumstances, encouraged to […]]]>

Ohio University students can now apply for the LLM program in Law, Justice, and Culture and begin graduate school in the spring, take postgraduate courses, and quickly start a one-year Masters.

Undergraduate students who are accepted into the master’s program are, under certain circumstances, encouraged to begin the degree earlier by taking graduate courses for graduate credit in the spring semester.

This option applies to any qualifying Ohio University graduate student (at least 90 undergraduate hours earned), for a maximum of three courses (12 credit hours).

Students must have been accepted into the master’s program by the end of the fall semester to take graduate courses in the spring.

Click here to find out how to apply for the Masters in Law, Justice and Culture.

To be eligible to take graduate courses as an undergraduate student, students must have an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.2. Students should also complete a special form available from the Program Director, Dr Haley Duschinski, and Graduate College.

After obtaining their undergraduate degree, students move on to the master’s program and complete the master’s degree in a single year of full-time graduate study.

About the Masters in Law, Justice and Culture

The MA in Law, Justice and Culture focuses on the critical analysis of law in relation to society, culture, politics and power. This MSc is designed for anyone who deals with law academically or professionally – including people in careers that deal with law, as well as those considering a law study or a doctorate. programs.

The master’s degree in law, justice and culture:

  • Can be completed in person on campus or entirely online.
  • Offers research-driven teaching by faculty with national and global expertise in their fields.
  • Builds skills in analytical and conceptual thinking, legal and academic research and writing, ethical and public interest concerns, public advocacy and active engagement in the face of challenges to law and justice in Canada. 21st century.

Click here to learn more about recent graduates of the Masters in Law, Justice and Culture program.

Dr Haley Duschinski

Why study law and society?

“Law and society are a dynamic interdisciplinary field,” said Duschinski, associate professor of anthropology. “As a law and society degree, the new masters program draws on the analytical, interpretive and imaginative tools of the liberal arts to shed light on the moral and political elements of law, as well as its meaning and significance. in our daily life. ”

The program emphasizes research-based teaching and learning. All students are required to conduct independent, university-level research by completing either a master’s thesis or a master’s research essay, with the option of a comprehensive research course. The program also offers professional training in academic presentation and communication through its curricular and extracurricular components.

Core courses focus on the theoretical traditions of legal scholarship and society and on the deep integration of theory and methods into this interdisciplinary field, while elective courses examine law from different disciplinary perspectives. .

The program also offers an annual nine-day study abroad program focusing on human rights, law and justice in post-conflict Northern Ireland. This study abroad experience includes interactions with veterans, human rights lawyers, former political prisoners, victims’ associations and restorative justice practitioners, as well as visits to museums, d old prisons and non-governmental organizations.

Click here to learn more about the CLJC Study Abroad Program on Human Rights, Law and Justice in Northern Ireland. The Northern Ireland program is expected to resume in spring 2023.

Dynamic Center for Law, Justice and Culture

The degree is housed at the Center for Law, Justice and Culture at Ohio University, an interdisciplinary education and research center focused on law in relation to the social and political challenges of the 21st century.

“The center is an energetic community of students and faculty deeply committed to studying the role of law in our contemporary world. We coordinate socio-legal studies at Ohio University, ”Duschinski said.

The center supports university education in law and society through interdisciplinary coursework and research, as well as extracurricular academic and professional development opportunities, including pre-legal counseling and programs. It brings together perspectives from African American studies, anthropology, criminology, history, political science, sociology, and other related fields.

The centre’s professors are leading scholars with national and global expertise on various forms of law in contemporary, historical and comparative contexts.

“We conduct empirical research on legal actors and institutions, rights claims and struggles for justice, the relationship between social movements and legal mobilizations, alternative jurisdictional and legal orders, and coercive power and potential emancipator of the law, ”added Duschinski.

Duschinski serves as an academic advisor to students in the program, and CLJC pre-legal advisor Larry Hayman provides dedicated advice on law school preparation, law school applications, and pursuing careers related to the law school. law.

Benefits of the Masters in Law, Justice and Culture

People who have recently completed their undergraduate education with little work experience can expand their academic and professional training by earning the Masters in Law, Justice and Culture. The degree is ideal for people considering law school or a doctorate. program.

For recent college graduates, the on-campus masters option offers one year of graduate training in socio-legal theory, methods, research and writing before applying to law school, doctoral programs or starting their studies. career in research and policy. , government agencies, advocacy organizations, private companies and non-profit organizations.

Learn more about alumni and their experiences, including:

Click here to learn more about our recent graduates of the Masters in Law, Justice and Culture program.

For more information, contact Duschinski at duschins@ohio.edu or Hayman at hayman@ohio.edu.


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How West Virginia Created Universal Pre-K https://endgradeinflation.org/how-west-virginia-created-universal-pre-k/ Sat, 16 Oct 2021 07:00:07 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/how-west-virginia-created-universal-pre-k/ One of the most popular measures in President Biden’s social safety net bill, at least according to the polls, is the universal, free kindergarten. It also appears to be one of the more acceptable parts of the bill for Senator Joe Manchin, a key moderate Democrat who insisted on drastically reducing the bill’s $ 3.5 […]]]>

One of the most popular measures in President Biden’s social safety net bill, at least according to the polls, is the universal, free kindergarten.

It also appears to be one of the more acceptable parts of the bill for Senator Joe Manchin, a key moderate Democrat who insisted on drastically reducing the bill’s $ 3.5 trillion price tag. While Mr Manchin has repeatedly raised concerns about spending on paid vacation, child care and child tax credits, he said he was “fully” on the goal of pre -universal kindergarten.

Maybe that’s because all 4-year-olds in his own state of West Virginia already have access to a free public preschool. Indeed, the West Virginia program, seen as a national model, was partially rolled out during Mr. Manchin’s tenure as governor, from 2005 to 2010, with bipartisan support.

But the state’s agenda also shows why the nationwide rollout of Universal Pre-K could be bumpy. West Virginia has faced challenges in funding, staffing, and locating physical space – and it took not just years, but a decade, to become established. There is also disagreement over the impact of the program on the state’s historically poor academic performance.

Policymakers say preschool has become an accepted part of West Virginia’s public education system. More than two-thirds of 4-year-olds enrolled last year.

The program “is an illustration of what people say they want to do,” said W. Steven Barnett, director of the National Institute for Early Education Research.

West Virginia has one of the highest child and family poverty rates in the country and one of the lowest median household incomes. But the program’s availability for all families, regardless of their ability to pay, has helped make it popular.

Indeed, even professional families in the predominantly rural state have struggled to find quality preschool education.

Lloyd G. Jackson II, a former Democratic state senator who was instrumental in shaping the program, recalled that his wife drove two hours a day to take their sons, now in their thirties, to kindergarten.

“Out of 55 West Virginia counties, I guess in two-thirds there wouldn’t have been access no matter how much money you had,” Jackson said.

This lack of preschools contributed to the long deployment. The state legislature enacted universal access to kindergarten in 2002; the program did not take full effect until 10 years later.

Other states share this problem. About 60 percent of rural Americans live in communities considered “child care deserts” because of the shortage of licensed daycares and preschool seats.

“It’s hard for politicians to say they’ve put us on a 20-year path, but that’s really the lesson of places like West Virginia,” Professor Barnett said. “At the current rate, it would take 100 to 150 years before we have universal preschool. If you did it in 50 years, it would be a huge acceleration. If you did it in 20, that would be amazing.

In recent years, the West Virginia legislature, which has shifted from Democratic to Republican control, has placed less emphasis on program development – to serve all 3-year-olds, for example, as they would. the Biden plan – and more on priorities. such as the creation of charter schools and education savings accounts.

That’s why advocates hope to capitalize on Washington’s current interest in preschool. But other early childhood education experts have warned that the president’s plan to spend money on wealthier families takes away the ability to improve programs for students with greater needs – in paying teachers more, for example, or extending the school day to better match parents. ‘ Working hours.

And some question whether pouring money into pre-K, pointing out that the years from birth to age 3 are perhaps more crucial for brain development and for bridging gaps. future gaps in academic achievement.

“You’re not going to find a brain researcher in the country who thinks that going to school when you’re 4 instead of 5 is going to be a game-changer for kids,” said Katharine B. Stevens, a former early childhood researcher. affiliated with the American Enterprise Institute, a center-right think tank.

The dollars would be better spent, she said, on improving antenatal care, helping mothers develop parenting skills and providing quality child care to disadvantaged infants and toddlers.

Kindergarten students who had participated in the West Virginia preschool program demonstrated more sophisticated math, literacy and language skills, according to a 2018 study. But the case for longer-term academic benefits is more difficult to argue.

Adam Kissel, a senior researcher at the Cardinal Institute for West Virginia Policy, a conservative think tank, said the existence of a universal pre-kindergarten in the state had not stopped West Virginia from showing consistently good performance. poor in fourth grade reading and math.

But educators in West Virginia pointed to other benefits of the state’s approach to pre-K. One of the unusual features of the program is that it serves children eligible for Head Start, the federal preschool program for low-income families, alongside middle-class students and affluent families, often in the same wards. class.

At Brookhaven Elementary School in Morgantown, five of 13 Allison Stump Preschool students qualify for Head Start and receive additional support. But all of her students benefit from the hands-on, play-based curriculum and the opportunity to be screened early for learning and developmental disabilities, Ms. Stump said.

By the time they get to kindergarten, these children will be used to the routines of the classroom. Ms. Stump noted that her job requires extensive training, preparation for classes, and an endless amount of energy.

“It’s very time consuming,” she says. “There isn’t a lot of seating.”

The West Virginia program was funded without raising taxes; much of the state has lost its school-age population in recent years, meaning that dollars could more easily be reallocated to kindergarten.

While many districts across the country lost students during the coronavirus pandemic, a preschool expansion of the scope President Biden envisioned would be much more complex to fund. His plan for pre-K, child care, paid time off and other family supports would be partially paid for by raising taxes for the rich. Like the expansion of Medicaid, it would also require states to contribute dollars, which some might not want to do.

And any national expansion would face the challenge of finding places to put the kids. Some students in West Virginia are offered preschool places in day care centers, where workers can earn much less than pre-K teachers who work in elementary schools.

Finding and training enough teachers was a problem in West Virginia, and one of the reasons it took a full decade to roll out the program. In New York City, with its wealth of workers and educational infrastructure, Mayor Bill de Blasio managed to launch his universal pre-K plan in less than a year. But current labor shortages could make this more difficult.

Quality education makes the difference. Ms. Stump, 26, has a master’s degree and began her career with over 1,000 hours of teaching experience.

This training was crucial for his ability to work with children like Walker Garver, who suffers from autism spectrum disorders and is non-verbal. She teaches him sign language and social skills.

Walker’s mother Carrie Garver said her son likely wouldn’t be in kindergarten at all without the public program, as many private schools don’t serve children like him. And the fact that Walker has a place to go during the day means she can continue her graduate studies.

Free pre-K was “life-changing,” Ms. Garver said. “And for the child, that’s it.


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No Notes, No Notes | News, Sports, Jobs https://endgradeinflation.org/no-notes-no-notes-news-sports-jobs/ Fri, 15 Oct 2021 04:11:18 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/no-notes-no-notes-news-sports-jobs/ William Holmes McGuffey PK-8 Elementary School third-grade teacher Marc Ellis presents a math lesson to students in September 2019, before the coronavirus pandemic sets in. Many students spent most of the 2020-21 school year learning at a distance. According to the 2020-21 Ohio School Reports, the three largest schools in the Mahoning Valley had some […]]]>

William Holmes McGuffey PK-8 Elementary School third-grade teacher Marc Ellis presents a math lesson to students in September 2019, before the coronavirus pandemic sets in. Many students spent most of the 2020-21 school year learning at a distance.

According to the 2020-21 Ohio School Reports, the three largest schools in the Mahoning Valley had some of the worst attendance rates and some of the least impressive graduation rates.

Released by the Ohio Department of Education on Thursday, the reports are different from previous years, with no written notes. Enrollment figures, attendance rates, graduation rates, and performance and teacher statistics have been released, but no overall rating or rating for districts or buildings has been given, in accordance with to a law passed by state lawmakers recognizing “the various barriers to education that the pandemic has presented,” according to ODE.

PRESENCE, DIPLME NUMBERS

The school districts of Austintown, Warren and Youngstown are the three largest in the valley, each with over 4,000 students. Youngstown is the largest district, with about 4,700 students, and has the worst attendance and graduation rates of the two counties – a graduation rate of 87.3% and an attendance rate of 78.4%.

Youngstown City Schools CEO Justin Jennings said that although attendance and graduation rates are low, the district has the highest four-year / five-year graduation rate of all Distressed School Districts in the State or Ohio 8 – a group of eight urban Ohio school districts that include Akron, Cleveland, and Columbus.

“Although we are very disappointed with the numbers, we will continue to work to improve the learning of our academics. It’s an ever-changing process, ”Jennings said.

The district has been hit by the pandemic as it stole attention, he said. However, administrators will study the data to identify where and how to improve, Jennings said.

No other school district in the Mahoning Valley has an attendance rate below 90 percent, except Warren, at 85.4 percent.

Austintown District at 91.2%, Struthers and Campbell have some of the lowest attendance rates in Mahoning County, while Liberty Schools in Trumbull County are the lowest with Warren.

Pete Pirone, superintendent of schools in the town of Struthers, said the pandemic had hit schools hard.

The district has implemented a summer school, after-school intervention program, tutoring and other monitoring programs and systems to identify and help late children, Pirone said.

Children who start school already behind on kindergarten and first grade skills often have the most problems, Pirone said. Socio-economic issues exacerbate the problem, he said.

However, the district has alternative programs and improvement programs to catch up with students and prepare them for life after graduation, he said.

While Youngstown is the largest city and largest school district in Mahoning County and has the lowest graduation rate, the smallest county school district in Sebring is not far behind with a rate of 89.5. %. This figure has improved by 7.1 percentage points since the 2020 report.

Toni Viscounte, superintendent of schools in Sebring, said that a small class of graduates – only 383 students are enrolled in the district – means that even one or two students disconnecting at age 18 “has a huge impact on the percentage of graduation. “.

The district is making efforts to improve, she said. The data is one year behind.

“We have identified the students most at risk and implemented specific targeted strategies to ensure our students have the right path to graduation. Although we are not finished, our efforts are paying off, ”said Viscounte.

The local school district of Jackson-Milton has the second highest graduation rate at 98.4% and the district of Lowellville has the highest at 100%, a figure matched by Bristol schools in Trumbull County.

“We are very proud and committed to academic success alongside safety, as our first and foremost priority. Our Kindergarten to Grade 12 staff work transparently to ensure that children graduate at the highest percentage rates (and) that they are ready to achieve any of their aspirations, ”a said Eugene Thomas, superintendent of schools in Lowellville.

The districts of Poland and the Western Branch also had graduation rates of 98% or more in 2020.

In County Trumbull, besides Bristol, LaBrae District, Weathersfield and Maplewood schools had the highest graduation rates, all 97.7 or higher.

“We are always proud of the great work our entire district does for graduate students at a high rate. The district continues to work as a team to maintain high standards of graduation and attendance, ”said Damon Dohar, Principal of Weathersfield Schools.

John Vitto, deputy superintendent of Canfield schools, said the district was “proud” of its graduation and attendance rates. The district has the third highest graduation rate of any district in Mahoning County with 98.2%, one of the highest in the valley as well. The rate increased 0.2 percentage points from 2020. The district’s attendance rate is the third highest in Mahoning County at 95.5%.

Vitto said in-person training with online options for quarantined students was part of the key to their success. He also said that the high expectations set by teachers, parents and the students themselves have led to student success.

“Getting his high school diploma on time is an expectation in our community,” said Vitto.

Other aspects not measured by the report card are also important to the success of a school district, Vitto said.

“These indicators are not the only indicators that measure a good school community. School climate matters – extracurricular opportunities, social and emotional variables – things a report can’t really measure, ”Vitto said.

STATE SUPPORT

“While we don’t have as much information as usual, schools and districts can use the data from this year’s report cards to guide decisions about where and how to focus time, effort and resources that will best serve their students amid the challenges of the pandemic, ”said Dr. Stephanie K. Siddens, Acting Superintendent of Public Education.

Visit reportcard.education.ohio.gov to explore the data.

The ODE provides resources and support to help districts make “student-centered decisions that lead to improvement”.

The state’s educational community has shown great perseverance throughout the pandemic, Siddens said.

“The entire educational community continues to be a model of perseverance, dedication and resilience despite the challenges that still exist inside and outside the classroom. I applaud districts and schools across the state for their commitment to innovation and creativity as they continue to ensure that students, educators and staff are healthy, safe. and succeed every day, ”she said.

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Hartnett leaves SAD 17 and continues to lead professional development for district administrators https://endgradeinflation.org/hartnett-leaves-sad-17-and-continues-to-lead-professional-development-for-district-administrators/ Wed, 13 Oct 2021 22:00:36 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/hartnett-leaves-sad-17-and-continues-to-lead-professional-development-for-district-administrators/ PARIS – It’s unusual for a single person to be able to impact their workplace and community for a generation. It is even rarer to continue this influence after moving to new companies. But that’s the future of longtime Oxford Hills deputy superintendent Patrick Hartnett, PhD. The longtime assistant superintendent of Oxford Hills is leaving […]]]>

PARIS – It’s unusual for a single person to be able to impact their workplace and community for a generation. It is even rarer to continue this influence after moving to new companies. But that’s the future of longtime Oxford Hills deputy superintendent Patrick Hartnett, PhD.

The longtime assistant superintendent of Oxford Hills is leaving his job for a teaching post, but his presence and influence in Oxford Hills will continue. Nicole Carter / Democratic Announcer

Hartnett’s last day with SAD 17 is tomorrow. He accepted a tenure-track position at the University of Southern Maine as an assistant professor in its School of Education and Human Development. In his new role at USM, Hartnett will continue to mentor and lead the staff and faculty of SAD 17 pursuing graduate studies, directly in the district headquarters office.

In 1993, fresh out of the University of Maine Orono with a bachelor’s degree in political science, Hartnett was recruited by a former professor of history at Oxford Hills Comprehensive High School to be a long-term replacement for American Studies. At the end of the school year, he was hired to take the job on a permanent basis and obtained his teacher certification from Maine.

Mentored by then-principal Phil Blood to consider a career as a school administrator, Hartnett earned his Masters in Educational Leadership and was appointed Deputy Principal of the High School in 2000. After four years in the role, Hartnett was hired. from Oxford Hills to serve as Principal of Leavitt Area High School in Turner, returning to Oxford Hills in 2010, this time as Deputy District Superintendent.

“It worked really well for my family,” Hartnett said of his return to SAD 17. “My children were the age where they were involved in all kinds of activities. We live in Hebron, halfway between Paris and Turner. I was pulled the other way and stretched between the events and responsibilities I had as a manager of Leavitt and my children’s activities here. This job has allowed me to attend district events where my kids were, which was great.

Hartnett said that over the years the district has been very supportive of its own lifelong learning. He pursued his doctorate at the Muskie School of Public Service, obtaining this degree in 2015 as part of a program combining public policy and educational leadership.

“Public policy determines resources and decisions about it, looking at situations with the public good in mind,” he explained. “Education can be viewed as a public good. It’s a natural combination with these two.

With her own education and background built around great schools, overseeing politics, personnel and finances, the next natural step was to teach it to others. Hartnett became an Assistant Instructor at USM 2016, juggling district responsibilities and teaching postgraduate courses in educational leadership. Many of his classes were held at UMaine’s satellite site in Paris and many of his students were SAD 17 educators and administrators, working on their own postgraduate degrees.

“Every time you change jobs, your role changes,” Hartnett said of his return to being an educator. “I found myself moving further away from the kids and from teaching. I enjoy the student-teacher relationship and the mentorship. That’s the power of it.

When a permanent tenure-track position opened at USM’s School of Education last spring, Hartnett threw his hat in the ring and accepted the position last month. The courses he will teach as an assistant professor will focus on preparing principals and vice-principals, who still teach locally at the Oxford Hills Administrative Center in Paris.

Hartnett also agreed to continue working with SAD 17 in a consultant role, working with directors and assistants on the district’s internal professional development program for administrators, known as the Leadership Academy.

“It’s teacher leadership,” he explained of his new job. “Intended for school and district leadership within the USM Masters program.”

Hartnett lives in Hebron with his wife Tracey, formerly an educator in Oxford Hills, and their family. Her eldest daughter Hannah recently moved to Portland, her second daughter Maggie is in her freshman year at Guildford College in North Carolina, and her son Thomas has just started his senior year at OHCHS.


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Alum Mentorship Connects With The Tar Heel https://endgradeinflation.org/alum-mentorship-connects-with-the-tar-heel/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 15:16:11 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/alum-mentorship-connects-with-the-tar-heel/ History links CHAPEL HILL, NC – In most scenarios, the coach Karen Shelton would do their best to keep their UNC field hockey team from looking too far ahead, choosing instead to focus on the next game, which this Saturday morning was just over 24 hours away. But Shelton was indeed asking his team to […]]]>

CHAPEL HILL, NC – In most scenarios, the coach Karen Shelton would do their best to keep their UNC field hockey team from looking too far ahead, choosing instead to focus on the next game, which this Saturday morning was just over 24 hours away.

But Shelton was indeed asking his team to look ahead and provide them with exceptional role models to help them do so.

As part of the team’s 2021 Alumni Weekend September 24-26, the Tar Heels hosted a mentoring workshop, networking with former UNC players as current student-athletes continue. – or start – to plan their life after graduation.

“Their time here is going to pass faster than they think,” Shelton said. “Especially when they’re in first year, it seems like they have all the time in the world before graduation, and then all of a sudden it’s here. The point of this event, and our mentoring program , is to make sure our Tar Heels are ready for the next step. “

On September 25, about 3 hours after the Tar Heels concluded a 6-1 victory over the ACC over Boston College, the team held a short practice session to prepare for the next day’s game against UConn, then turned to more important goals. They split into groups of current and former Carolina student-athletes to discuss work in a variety of fields including healthcare, education, law, marketing, sales, and business. Within these groups, topics for discussion ranged from interviews and job search resumes to how best to present your student-athlete experience to a potential employer.

“It has been a privilege and a great opportunity for all of us to bond with alumni and learn more about their specific experiences in the field of work,” said the senior. Meredith sholder, who plans to go to AP school and has participated in the discussion on health care. “I really felt like I had answered all of my questions, and it helped me feel more confident and prepared. I am very happy to continue working with alumni to navigate my future, and I speak for my teammates when I say that we are incredibly grateful that these wonderful ladies are watching over us. “

The groups also discussed the transition from college life to the job market and ways the work ethic learned within the team will continue. (“Nothing I’ve faced in my career is as difficult as some of our workouts were,” an alum shared with a laugh.) And they offered great advice to the team. current, with a few highlights:
• Keep in touch with your former teammates for a bond that grows stronger over the years.
• Get involved in the UNC alumni network in the city where you live.
• Keep a little bit of UNC memorabilia, like a coffee cup, on your desk at work to inspire conversation and sometimes fun rivalries with colleagues who are alumni of rival institutions.
• Always wear sunscreen (“And when you think you’ve had enough, put on more.”)

Kristen McCann, who played for UNC from 1997 to 2000, spearheads the plans for the mentorship program. After graduating from Carolina in 2001, she went on to play for the United States National Team before dating William & Mary for a graduate degree. She now runs Focus Events, which offers field hockey and lacrosse programs across Virginia with a focus on developing female athletes to become confident leaders and great teammates.

McCann hopes this networking group will benefit current players and cultivate the connections between the present and the past of Tar Heels. “We want to build a professional and personal network for all women in UNC field hockey,” said McCann. “The women I have met through this program are some of the most capable leaders I have ever worked with. We want to harness the talents and passions of this group to create a welcoming and supportive environment that allows more women to identify and achieve their goals. Based on what we have learned at UNC and Coach Shelton, we will strive for excellence and prepare accordingly. “

The next step is to build one-on-one mentoring relationships, with a Career Symposium – something the Tar Heels do every few years – scheduled for spring.

“I’m so grateful that our former players have remained so invested in our program and are ready to impact our current players in this way,” Shelton said. “We always say you’re part of the Carolina family forever and that’s what we feel – our former players are still part of our program, just in a different way. I’m so proud of them and really excited. about this mentoring group and the impact it can have on our student-athletes. “


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In memory: William Whelan https://endgradeinflation.org/in-memory-william-whelan/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 10:23:24 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/in-memory-william-whelan/ William “Bill” Joseph Whelan, a renowned biochemist who embodied his own discovery (he was by nature a primer), died at his Miami home on June 5. He was 96 years old. Whelan was born in Salford, Lancashire, England on November 14, 1924. His mother was a housewife and his father, originally from Ireland, made skins […]]]>

William “Bill” Joseph Whelan, a renowned biochemist who embodied his own discovery (he was by nature a primer), died at his Miami home on June 5. He was 96 years old.

Whelan was born in Salford, Lancashire, England on November 14, 1924. His mother was a housewife and his father, originally from Ireland, made skins for sausages.

Miami University

William and Alina Whelan at the Miller School Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Retirement Celebration in 2019.

With a professor encouraging his interest in biochemistry, Whelan was the first in his family to attend college; he obtained three degrees from the University of Birmingham and was appointed professor while a graduate student. He then joined the University of North Wales, the Lister Institute at the University of London and later the Royal Free Hospital.

Sometimes an organization is transformed with the leadership of someone who is not from here. Whelan moved to the then 15-year-old Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami in 1967, remaining his chair of biochemistry until 1991 and retiring as one of its longest-serving professors. in 2019.

Whelan has worked on important storage molecules in animals and plants, glycogen and starch, respectively. When your stomach is empty, you check the body’s metaphorical cupboards, where you can thank glycogenin for putting aside a condensed form of glucose for such a long time.

But to catalyze requires raw materials. In the late 1980s, when Whelan’s crop of graduate students ran out and funding ran dry, his wife, Margaret, replaced his usual question (“Are you discovering something good today?” ? ”) By a suggestion to use a newly released pension from his teaching post in the UK. Earlier stores save the day when the levels are low. Whelan expanded his lab and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1992 (a year before Margaret’s death) in part thanks to a discovery of how to use glycogen stores – through glucosyltransferase reactions, in case where you would be wondering.

Mikael Häggström

In this 2D cross-sectional view of glycogen, a core protein of glycogenin is surrounded by branches of glucose units. The whole globular complex can contain about 30,000 glucose units.

Glycogenin, which Whelan is credited with discovering, is known to bring things together. Knowing about Florida’s winter draw, he launched a winter conference attracting Nobel laureates, which is now in its 53rd year. Fast-tracks for glycogenin; it is a catalyst. Whelan launched an acclaimed program in response to medical shortages, granting a doctorate. students – like glycogen itself – condensed course to complete an MD faster. And glycogenin is a self-starter; it self-phosphorylates. Whelan was too; he launched the journals Trends in Biomedical Science and Federation of European Biochemical Society Letters, and he remained editor-in-chief of the journal IUBMB Life (also president of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) until 2020, stating that he wanted biochemistry to be presented in “crystalline prose”.

Describing glycogenin as a catalyst for glycogen synthesis is the truth, but not the totality; glycogen joins the first molecules, then other enzymes continue the good work started. Whelan’s research is now in biochemistry textbooks, and the work of others he raised in journals is a rich reserve for those who derive energy from biochemistry. His work continues to give.

Whelan is survived by his wife, Alina, and her family in England.


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Workup Graduate Startups Acquire $ 7.2 Million Investments https://endgradeinflation.org/workup-graduate-startups-acquire-7-2-million-investments/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 03:23:04 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/workup-graduate-startups-acquire-7-2-million-investments/ The Workup Entrepreneurship program, mainly supported by Turkish private lender Işbank, selected its eighth quarter graduates. Seven startups were deemed successful enough to graduate from the Acceleration Program, including The Academys, Beklemesen, Ecording, Efilli, Finfree, Livad and Retter Business Services, all of whom shared their business models and roadmaps during the day. this week’s demo. […]]]>

The Workup Entrepreneurship program, mainly supported by Turkish private lender Işbank, selected its eighth quarter graduates.

Seven startups were deemed successful enough to graduate from the Acceleration Program, including The Academys, Beklemesen, Ecording, Efilli, Finfree, Livad and Retter Business Services, all of whom shared their business models and roadmaps during the day. this week’s demo.

Ongoing since 2017, the Workup Entrepreneurship program has received a total of 13,000 applications to date, including 600 for the eighth term.

A total of 81 startups have so far been deemed successful enough to graduate from the program, which has accepted some 107 startups to date.

Some 59 graduate companies are still active and continue their entrepreneurial journey. A total of 30 different startups included in the program have so far received a total of $ 7.2 million (TL 64.26 million) in investment.

The key to growth

Addressing the Demo Day, held online, Isbank Managing Director Hakan Aran said that there is a serious positive correlation between the employment created by startups with their growth and the growth of the country.

“Thus, the country’s growth is supported by supporting entrepreneurs,” noted Aran.

Aran pointed out some turning points in shaping the entrepreneurial journey of the lender.

These include their Maxis Innovative Venture Capital Investment Fund, which provides capital support to promising start-ups, the API portal for startups as well as Softtech Ventures, which sets up new businesses based on innovative ideas.

He also noted the bank’s acquisition of fintech startup Moka Ödeme last year to diversify payment systems. Aran further highlighted the marketing platform they established to transform their e-commerce skills into a new ecosystem.

Entrepreneurship branch

Aran announced the launch this year of an entrepreneurship branch to provide financial support to startups. Unlike a classic bank branch with a unique design and a personalized service model, the branch will only serve startups and the entrepreneurial ecosystem.

“As part of our vision to become a platform combining agriculture, finance and technology, we have also launched the WorkupAgri agricultural entrepreneurship program under the umbrella of Workup to support only agriculture-focused technology initiatives and strengthen agriculture in our country with sustainable solutions. », Declared the general manager.

In addition, he noted that they are partnering with one of the main ecosystem stakeholders, the Vehbi Koç Foundation and the University of Koç, to implement a powerful new platform to further support the entrepreneurs with the aim of focusing on sustainability and impact investing.

Investment in 5 startups

The investment fund Maxis Innovative Venture Capital has so far invested $ 3.13 million in five startups, according to Aran, as well as an investment of TL 1.9 million ($ 212,858) in Mindside, a graduate of the sixth term for Workup, in January this year and PCI Checklist, a portfolio company that also graduated from the Accelerate Program, in July.

“We believe that entrepreneurship is not just a structure of thought specific to the founders of startups. In this context, we launched our In-House Entrepreneurship Program to strengthen the skills of our bank employees to act as entrepreneurs and promote the emergence of innovative business ideas, ”he underlined.

“We plan to implement some of the valuable ideas conveyed by our employees as part of the internal entrepreneurship program so that they are self-sufficient in the bank’s product line or outside before the end of the year. This year.”

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The 7 graduates of the eighth term of Workup

Below are the characteristics of the seven startups that graduated from the eighth quarter of the Workup Entrepreneurship Program.

The Academies: An initiative that offers training in many fields to those who wish to pursue a career in the esports industry and offers e-sport integration of brands with tournaments and events.

Beklemesen: A marketplace platform that saves time by allowing customers to create and pay for their orders at self-service coffee vendors upstream before arriving and taking their deliveries.

Registration : A social enterprise that develops sustainable and innovative environmental technologies against the global climate crisis by using self-developed unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to shoot seed balls in areas that need to be reforested but are in difficult areas access.

Efilli: A cookie management platform that allows users to easily collect permissions regarding cookies used by websites.

Free end: A next-generation mobile investment platform rich in education, basic analysis and portfolio monitoring tools that aims to enable investors to invest in stocks traded on Turkish and US stock exchanges with experience simple investment.

Livad: A startup that aims to enable publishers to regularly convert their content into money and enable brands to effectively reach their customers thanks to the live advertising technologies it has developed.

Retter Business Services: A service platform that delivers out-of-the-box, cloud-based business models to enterprises serving the end user.


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How I got here: Why biomedical optics researcher Alistair Lewis left Bangalore for Philly https://endgradeinflation.org/how-i-got-here-why-biomedical-optics-researcher-alistair-lewis-left-bangalore-for-philly/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 21:52:36 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/how-i-got-here-why-biomedical-optics-researcher-alistair-lewis-left-bangalore-for-philly/ Adopting a “growth mindset” can be applied to any major life change – from moving to a new country to pursuing a new career. Sometimes he lives at the intersection of the two. Alistair lewis grew up in Bangalore, India’s Silicon Valley. After obtaining his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in chemistry from the Indian Institute […]]]>
Adopting a “growth mindset” can be applied to any major life change – from moving to a new country to pursuing a new career. Sometimes he lives at the intersection of the two.

Alistair lewis grew up in Bangalore, India’s Silicon Valley. After obtaining his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in chemistry from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, he moved from one continent to another to pursue a doctorate. to University of Pennsylvania. His doctorate is in the field of biomedical optics (think pulse oximeters) where he seeks to develop non-invasive tools for better prediction of the severity of carbon monoxide poisoning. He is also working on the development of tools for the detection of water in tissues, which has enormous potential in the treatment of diseases where there is an accumulation of fluid in the tissues.

Outside of graduate school, he loves to travel – he’s checked 16 states since he’s been in the United States – exploring the neighborhoods and food scene of Philly, or just spending a quiet day listening or reading a book.

Philly Campus interviewed Lewis about his research, why he chose Philly, and how he overcame homesickness with the support of Penn.

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You studied chemistry in India before coming to the University of Pennsylvania to pursue a doctorate. in biomedical optics. What made you choose Philly and what do you like most about the area?

At the end of the doctoral application cycle. program, I had two offers, one to Texas A&M and one at Penn. Penn Chemistry I had more teachers whose work interested me. Penn Chemistry also had the most diverse faculty of any school I applied to. Half of the cohort was also international, which was very heartwarming for me as an international student. Before moving to Philly, I had spent most of my life in Bangalore, which is a large city of 10 million people. Moving to Philly, which is also a fairly large city, was very appealing to me.

What I like most about the region is its diversity. I have never felt out of place in this city as a person of color or as an international student. The variety of cuisines to which I have access is mind-boggling! I also really like the Philadelphians’ passion for their sports teams. For someone who has always loved sports, it’s great to be in a place with such passionate fans.

What problem do you hope to solve with your research in biomedical optics?

One of the issues I’m working on for my thesis is understanding carbon monoxide poisoning. Current techniques only confirm exposure but have limited utility in predicting disease severity. I hope that at the end of the project, we can find non-invasive optical markers to make more informed decisions about the severity of the disease and thus offer better ways to treat the disease. I find this problem intellectually stimulating as well as socially fulfilling since Philly has a significant number of cases of carbon monoxide poisoning.

As an international student, it’s a huge adjustment to move halfway around the world. When did you start to feel like you had found your place in Philadelphia?

My first semester in Philly was very tough. Having never lived outside of Bangalore, I was struck by severe homesickness in the middle of the semester. And with no local social network to lean on, the school stress was a little too much to bear. Without the Psychological counseling and services at Penn and my therapist there, I would have found it almost impossible to make it to the end of the semester. I have also been extremely fortunate to participate in a Penn Chemistry graduate program that understands the mental health issues facing graduate students. In particular, I thank my chair of graduate studies Zahra Fakhrai and graduate studies coordinator Kristen simon for helping me through this time.

I think I found my place during my second semester in Philly, when I got to grips with the nature of the program. I also visited my friends more often in other cities and they were (and always will be) pillars of support for me. Also, being part of a lab (since we joined a lab in the second semester) meant I had people to talk to so things didn’t go too badly. I also started exploring different restaurants and areas of the city with my roommate, which helped me become more familiar with the city. There wasn’t really a fixed time, but a gradual process by which I adapted to the city.

Alistair Lewis. (Photo via Philly Campus)

You got a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in chemistry and you could have gone in many directions. What influenced your decision to focus on biomedical optics?

When I started the program at Penn Chemistry, I wanted to work on spectroscopy (a technique that analyzes how a material interacts with light) and other optical techniques. As part of my classes, I had taken a graduate course in optics taught by the professor Arjun Yodh in the physics department. I first started in a biophysics lab in the chemistry department that used two very interesting optical techniques, but after six months I decided to change fields because I wanted to do more applied research in nature. .

At that time, I wrote to Arjun. Arjun’s research really turned me on (and still does) because of the direct impact it has. Research is very translational in nature and unlike basic scientific research, research reaches patients in need in a much shorter time frame. After a series of interviews and discussions, he offered me a position in his laboratory which would become permanent after four months if the progress made was satisfactory. And here I am after a year and a half!

What does a typical day look like for you (if there is one)?

My work can be roughly divided into three parts: instrumentation, data collection in animal experiments, and data analysis. So I have three “typical” days, so to speak. On the days I spend on instrumentation, I am in the instrument lab, coding to interface with instruments, calibrating them, or collecting test data. When I collect data in animal experiments, I’m usually in the animal lab at 6 a.m., getting ready for the experiment. On average, I’ll end up spending eight to nine hours in the lab on these days.

For data analysis, I am usually at home. I write code to process the collected data and see if what is being processed makes scientific sense. On those days my day would start at 10 am and end between 7 pm and 7:30 pm In a typical week I would have one or two days of animal testing and the other days I would either do some chores. data or instrumentation analysis. I am also always up to date with scientific literature and attend group meetings.

If you had to give one piece of advice to an aspiring tech professional in college, what would it be?

I think the most important thing is to have a growth mindset. Keep an open mind and be open to learning new things and taking on projects or internships that push you out of your intellectual comfort zone. It takes years to be an expert at something that goes through a process of lifelong learning.

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Humanities Welcomes New Professors and Staff https://endgradeinflation.org/humanities-welcomes-new-professors-and-staff/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 22:26:12 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/humanities-welcomes-new-professors-and-staff/ New Faculty Josefina Bittar, Assistant Professor, Languages ​​and Applied Linguistics Josefina Bittar obtained her doctorate. in Linguistics at the University of New Mexico. After earning her BA in Spanish Language and Literature from the Universidad Nacional de Asunción (Paraguay), she was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to earn an MA in Linguistics, also at UNM. Being […]]]>

New Faculty

Josefina Bittar, Assistant Professor, Languages ​​and Applied Linguistics

Josefina Bittar obtained her doctorate. in Linguistics at the University of New Mexico. After earning her BA in Spanish Language and Literature from the Universidad Nacional de Asunción (Paraguay), she was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to earn an MA in Linguistics, also at UNM. Being born and raised in a highly bilingual country like Paraguay sparked Josefina’s interest in bilingualism and the mutual influences between languages. Josefina’s research focuses on the syntactic influences between Spanish and Paraguayan Guaraní, the two official languages ​​of her country of origin. She has taught linguistics courses at UNM and the Universidad Nacional de Asunción, and looks forward to serving UCSC students.

Fun fact: if you’re nice to Josefina, she’ll make you Paraguayan empanadas (which are usually fried and really tasty).

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Marisol LeBrón, Associate Professor, Feminist Studies

Marisol LeBrón is an interdisciplinary scholar whose research and teaching focuses on race, social inequality, policing, violence and protest. Prior to joining UCSC, she held positions at the University of Texas at Austin, Dickinson College, and Duke University. She got her doctorate. in American Studies from New York University and his BA in Comparative American Studies and Latin American Studies from Oberlin College.

She is currently working on a new book project, Against the Wall: Maintaining Order and Making Latinxes, which aims to discover the central role of policing in the emergence and consolidation of the Latinx identity in the United States. She is currently vice-president / president-elect of the Association of Puerto Rican Studies and member of the executive committee of the Association for American Studies.

Fun Fact: Marisol loves cooking, reality TV, sports documentaries, and building Lego Brickheadz in her spare time (which she hasn’t had a lot of lately since welcoming her daughter Isla to her home in June. ).

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Rachel Walker, Professor, Linguistics

Rachel Walker is a theoretical phonologist, with central contributions to the cognitive representation of consonants and vowels, positional prominence, and long-distance processes in sound models of world languages. In recent research, she has examined the complex nature of liquid consonants and studied the phonology of Ladin, an endangered minority language spoken in northern Italy.

Fun fact: Rachel has a deep appreciation for mountains, especially for hiking around lakes and alpine meadows. His love of the mountains pairs well with his love of processed alpine cheese, especially in the form of cheese fondue and raclette.

New employees and promotions

Sarah Arantza Amador, Manager, Linguistics

Sarah Arantza Amador brings a wealth of experience from across the university, including undergraduate education, graduate counseling and program management. She obtained a BA in Literature and Philosophy (Honors) from UCSC in 2005. She then obtained an MA in Spanish and Portuguese Languages ​​and Literatures at NYU in 2010. She returned to UCSC in 2010 as a lecturer at Merrill & Stevenson colleges. Since then, she has served as Graduate Programs Coordinator and Advisor for Politics, Latin American and Latin American Studies, MCD Biology, and Evolutionary Ecology and Biology. Most recently, she supported community studies as an administrative director.

Sarah’s deep love for universities, their students, and research is reflected in her commitment to student success, her strategic vision for program sustainability, and her agile leadership in our ever-changing environment.

Fun fact: Sarah is a flash fiction writer and is currently working on her first novel. She is also an avid knitter and has not worn commercially made socks for at least five years.

Ruby Barnett, Manager, History of Consciousness

Ruby (Ruthanna) Barnett has always been interested in communication, conflict resolution and the development of a meaningful life. She has over twenty years of experience in project and people management, in academia, the non-profit sector, social justice and legal environments. After obtaining his doctorate. in Linguistics from Lancaster University, she entered the nonprofit sector, championing housing and homelessness, debt, employment and welfare. As a lawyer at Oxford, she specialized in immigration and human rights.

After moving to Santa Cruz in 2012, Ruby worked in the prosecutor’s office and then UCSC where she conducted climate research for an environmental artist professor. She is deeply aware of the urgency of our climate emergency and committed to working on the transitions necessary for a paradigm shift. She is a former student of the Capra course where she leads a study group.

Fun fact: Ruby lived on a barge on the Oxford Canal.

Kimberly Hwe, Divisional Humanities Liaison

Kim Hwe (pronouns: she / her) has been promoted to the post of Divisional Liaison in Humanities. Kim’s experience as a local IT specialist over the past three years has enhanced the division’s technical support, in addition to continuing the services offered through the Humanities University Service Center. She supported the division’s rapid transition to distance education while launching the campus-wide Zoom Corps educational support model, which she continues to oversee today; and his leadership has been instrumental in the modernization of the boardroom and classroom planned for this academic year. Kim was the first chair of the Diversity and Inclusion Group for the ITS Division (DIG IT), an advisory group to the Vice Chancellor of Information Technology that reviews diversity and inclusion efforts within of the STI division, and its advocacy led to the engagement of STI to think about how to approach inclusiveness through system improvements. Kim is leading an effort to pilot an inclusive STI internship program to support students’ personal and professional development and success.

Fun fact: Kim is vegan and has her own vegan cookbook online! If you want some great vegan recipes, feel free to email her.

Sarah Jordan, Deputy Director of Marketing and Communications, Humanities

Sarah jordan comes to us with deep ties with UC Santa Cruz and the Santa Cruz region. As a former student with a bachelor’s degree in environmental policy and planning and a minor in journalism, Sarah recently worked at the UCSC Arboretum as a media and events specialist. Prior to working at the Arboretum, Sarah was a publications and communications specialist at the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), where she helped update their brand and messages to reach bipartisan audiences around the world. . Sarah supports the Humanities Division in its marketing communications efforts, from distributing news articles to promoting events and supporting strategic outreach.

Fun Fact: Sarah loves swimming in the ocean all year round and shares homemade snacks with her swimming buddies to warm up on the beach.

Jessica McKenna, Director of University Programs and Planning

Jessica mckenna received her BA in English, a minor in American Studies from the University of Wittenberg, an MA in English from Simmons University, and master’s degree courses in curriculum and teaching from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She also received a Certificate in Equity and Diversity from the University of Minnesota.

Jessica spent nine years as Associate Director of Curriculum and Teaching in the English Department at the University of Minnesota, where she managed the English Literature and Creative Writing program and was responsible for the interim management and training of study programs for other departments of the College of Liberal Arts. .

Fun fact: Jessica has run twelve marathons, including Boston and New York, and plans to run the Chicago Marathon in 2022.

Laura Wilson, Department Director, Feminist Studies

Laura Wilson is an alumnus of UCSC, who received her masters from UC Santa Barbara and a doctorate. from the California Institute of Integral Studies. For the past five years, she has worked in Colleges 9 and 10, first as an assistant to the college director of studies and then as a college studies manager.

Laura has extensive administrative experience in managing schedules, curricula, budgeting and special projects; research and apply university policies; conduct staff reviews, recruit and assist new teachers. His colleagues praise his ability to think big while being attentive to detail, and his kind, caring and supportive presence.


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