Educational Institution – End Grade Inflation http://endgradeinflation.org/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 03:45:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://endgradeinflation.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Educational Institution – End Grade Inflation http://endgradeinflation.org/ 32 32 INSIDE THE GROWLER MISSILE SUBMARINE https://endgradeinflation.org/inside-the-growler-missile-submarine/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 03:45:00 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/inside-the-growler-missile-submarine/ The Intrepid Museum will present a free virtual tour of the Growler submarine on Thursday, December 8 from 6:30-7:30 p.m. ET. In this virtual event, the Intrepid Museum’s History and Collections Curator Jessica Williams will take the public on a live tour of a once top secret nuclear missile submarine! The Intrepid Museum is home […]]]>

The Intrepid Museum will present a free virtual tour of the Growler submarine on Thursday, December 8 from 6:30-7:30 p.m. ET. In this virtual event, the Intrepid Museum’s History and Collections Curator Jessica Williams will take the public on a live tour of a once top secret nuclear missile submarine!

The Intrepid Museum is home to the Growler submarine, the only missile submarine open to the public in the United States. In the early 1960s, Growler lurked in the freezing waters off the coast of Russia, while the crew awaited command to unleash their devastating weapons.

This one-hour live online experience will provide an in-depth tour of Growler.

Attendees will see the submarine’s control center, living areas, and top-secret missile center. Joining virtually will be former Growler crew members, David Bishop, a third-class torpedo boat, and Donald Bosetti, a second-class engineer. They will share stories of daily life on the submarine as well as moments of hardship and humor.

For more information visit: https://cloud.broadwayworld.com/rec/ticketclick.cfm?fromlink=2211111®id=&articlelink=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.eventbrite.com%2Fe%2Fbehind-the-scenes-live-inside-the- missile-submarine-growler-tickets-425804521787?utm_source=BWW2022&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=article&utm_content=bottombuybutton1

This is a FREE virtual program. To stream the conversation live, go to the Intrepid Museum website Tic, Facebook and Youtube.

The Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum is a non-profit educational facility that features the legendary Intrepid aircraft carrier, space shuttle Enterprise, the world’s fastest jets and a missile submarine. Through exhibits, educational programs and the largest collection of technologically groundbreaking aircraft and ships, visitors of all ages and abilities are taken on an interactive journey through history to learn about innovation and American bravery.

The Intrepid Museum fulfills its mission to honor our heroes, educate the public and inspire our youth by connecting them to history through hands-on exploration while building a bridge to the future by inspiring innovation.

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Want to find the best colleges in the best countries? Here is your list | Best Colleges https://endgradeinflation.org/want-to-find-the-best-colleges-in-the-best-countries-here-is-your-list-best-colleges/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 19:29:00 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/want-to-find-the-best-colleges-in-the-best-countries-here-is-your-list-best-colleges/ The countries at the top of the annual ranking of US News & World Report Ranking of the best countries score high in a number of economic, political, social and quality of life categories. They are also leaders in the field of higher education. Of the top five ranked countries, each of their top three […]]]>

The countries at the top of the annual ranking of US News & World Report Ranking of the best countries score high in a number of economic, political, social and quality of life categories. They are also leaders in the field of higher education.

Of the top five ranked countries, each of their top three universities ranks among the top 130 in the world, according to US News’ rankings of Best Global Universities. Most rank in the top 100, with many in the global top 50.

5. Sweden

With a population of 10.4 million, Sweden rose four spots from its 2021 ranking in US News’ Top Countries list. It ranks #1 for both perceptions quality of life and social purpose and ranks No. 9 for entrepreneurship – countries perceived as innovative with enterprising citizens.

1. Karolinska Institutet

Founded in 1810 as a school for army surgeons, the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm offers degrees solely in medical and health sciences. It is ranked #51 in US News’ Top Global Universities and, according to its website, the university accounts for almost 12% of university doctoral training in Sweden. In 2021, 60% of the 2,061 doctoral students at Karolinska Institutet were women.

Over 8,000 students attend the university, of which almost 2,200 are international students.

2. Lund University

Founded in 1666, Lund University is one of the oldest universities in Sweden. The school, which is tied for No. 112 in the world, enrolls 46,000 students, according to its website27% of them being international students from more than 130 countries. Tuition fees are free for students from European Union and European Economic Area countries as well as Switzerland.

3. Stockholm University

The school was founded in 1878 “as a radical alternative to the traditional educational institution” and did not administer examinations or award degrees until 1904, according to its website. Originally known as Stockholm University College, it gained university status in 1960 and today “stands for openness and accessibility with an active role in society”.

4. United States

The United States is considered the most powerful countries in the world, according to the US News ranking. These are countries that “consistently dominate news headlines, preoccupy policymakers and shape global economic models.” It also ranks #1 in agilityno. 2 in entrepreneurship and No. 3 in cultural influence.

The top two schools on the list of best universities in the world, Harvard and MIT, are both located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, just outside of Boston. The third, Stanford, is the best west coast school in Stanford, California.

1. Harvard University

The oldest university in the United States, Harvard was founded in 1636. Nearly 22,000 students, including about 5,400 international students, attend, according to US News data. It has the largest endowment of any school in the world and also houses the largest university library in the world with around 19 million volumes in its more than 70 libraries.

The Ivy League school ranks #1 in the US News Best Global Universities list. Eight US presidents have studied at Harvard, more than any other university.

2. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Distinguished alumni include Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin, former UN Secretary General Kofi Annan and former Federal Reserve Bank Chairman Ben Bernanke.

3. Stanford University

3. Canada

1. University of Toronto

Ranked #18 globally, the University of Toronto is a public institution founded in 1827 as King’s College. With more than 77,000 students enrolled, it is the largest university in Canada, according to US News data. More than 20,000 international students come from 170 different countries and regions.

2. University of British Columbia

Ranked #35 globally, the University of British Columbia was established in 1908 and opened in 1915. It has two main campuses – the Vancouver campus, where most UBC students attend, and the Okanagan campus, near Okanagan Lake in interior British Columbia. Nearly 59,000 students are enrolled, including more than 20,000 international students.

3. McGill University

2. Germany

1. University of Munich

Several Nobel Prize winners call the University of Munich their alma mater.

2. Ruprecht Karls Heidelberg University

Heidelberg University, as it is often colloquially known, was founded in 1386 after gaining the blessing of Pope Boniface IX and is Germany’s oldest university. It is home to over 19,000 students, of which approximately 4,000 are international. One of the research achievements associated with the University of Heidelberg, ranked No. 57 globally, is the creation of the Bunsen burner. Robert Bunsen taught in Heidelberg and invented this now common laboratory tool with several colleagues.

3. Humboldt University of Berlin

1. Switzerland

1. ETH Zürich

2. University of Zürich

Founded in 1833, the University of Zurich has 25,255 students, making it the largest university in Switzerland. It was also the first university in Europe to be established by a democratic political system, according to the school website. He is well known in scientific fields such as medicine, immunology, genetics, neuroscience and structural biology, and is also proud of his studies in economics. Twelve Nobel laureates have studied at the university.

3. Federal Polytechnic School of Lausanne

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Ratikanta Kanungo made Bharat Jodo Yatra a big hit for Odisha Congress https://endgradeinflation.org/ratikanta-kanungo-made-bharat-jodo-yatra-a-big-hit-for-odisha-congress/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 19:19:00 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/ratikanta-kanungo-made-bharat-jodo-yatra-a-big-hit-for-odisha-congress/ BJY Bharat Jodo Yatra is an ongoing mass movement started by the Indian National Congress. Ratikanta Kanungo turned this Yatra into a big hit in Odisha. BHUBANESWAR, ODISHA, INDIA, November 14, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — Bharat Jodo Yatra is an ongoing mass movement started by the Indian National Congress. Congress leader Rahul Gandhi is orchestrating the […]]]>

BJY

Bharat Jodo Yatra is an ongoing mass movement started by the Indian National Congress. Ratikanta Kanungo turned this Yatra into a big hit in Odisha.

BHUBANESWAR, ODISHA, INDIA, November 14, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — Bharat Jodo Yatra is an ongoing mass movement started by the Indian National Congress. Congress leader Rahul Gandhi is orchestrating the campaign by mobilizing party cadres and the general public to march from Kanyakumari, the southern tip of the peninsula, to the union territory of Jammu and Kashmir, s’ spanning 3,570 kilometers over 150 days.

The Congress said it launched the movement to unite the country against the so-called “divisive policy” of the Bharatiya Janata Party-led central government in New Delhi. Launched by Gandhi and the Chief Minister of Tamil Nadu, MK Stalin, on September 7, 2022, its main objective is to fight against the politics of “fear, bigotry and prejudice” and the economics of destruction of the means livelihoods, rising unemployment and growing inequality. The party’s presidential election took place during the movement.

Bharat Jodi Yatra from Congress reached Odisha last week.
Last week, this Yatra passed through Bhadrak district in Odisha; Although this Yatra has already appeared to be successful, everyone is shocked by its success in Bhadrak district.

The organization of the Congress in this district is also in a fragile position. The Biju Janata Dal occupies the entire district. The success of this Yatra in this district also shows that the observer of the Yatra in Bhadrak, Mr. Ratikanta Kanungo, has done a marvelous job in his district.

Shri Ratikanta traveled day and night in the village, town, tehsil, bloc and the whole district and held several meetings in one day in all the regions and did the work of bringing together the people of Bhadrak district. This only happened because of Mr. Ratikanta’s efficiency.

That is why this Yatra has been successful in Bhadrak district. He got a great public position through his hard work. It is necessary that if all Congress workers work as hard as Ratikanta Kanungo, then that day is not far off and Congress can return to power.

He also owns many educational institutions and is associated with the real estate industry. It does not do the work of the educational institution only for the accumulation of wealth but also for the general public To obtain the best quality of education and new dimensions of employment.

For these reasons, he leads all these educational institutions. Even before making headlines for his social work, he helped the poor during Corona times, when there was a time when the poor section worried about food. In Kakar district, food was provided to around 20,000 people daily for a single day, but continued throughout the Corona period.

Ratikant Kanungo
Ratikanta Kanungo
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]]> Campus closure case goes to state Supreme Court https://endgradeinflation.org/campus-closure-case-goes-to-state-supreme-court/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 08:10:00 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/campus-closure-case-goes-to-state-supreme-court/ The Florida State Supreme Court announced Tuesday that it will hear a court case against the University of South Florida for campus closures and remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. The higher court could overturn an earlier decision circuit court decision in June, which denied USF’s motion to dismiss and cleared the way for a […]]]>

The Florida State Supreme Court announced Tuesday that it will hear a court case against the University of South Florida for campus closures and remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The higher court could overturn an earlier decision circuit court decision in June, which denied USF’s motion to dismiss and cleared the way for a possible jury trial. The university’s lawyers filed a petition for the call last week.

PhD student ValerieMarie Moore originally filed a class action lawsuit against USF last March on behalf of herself and her peers. He alleges the university was in breach of contract when it moved to distance learning in 2020 and again in the spring of 2021 and failed to provide tuition-paid services.

“USF’s decision to move to online classes, to ask or encourage students to leave campus, and to close its campus facilities and services were responsible decisions to make, but it is unfair and illegal. for USF to retain the fees and pass the losses on to the students and their families,” the lawsuit alleges.

In May 2020, USF reported issuing more than $12 million in refunds students for accommodation and food costs.

Althea Johnson, director of media relations at USF, said Inside Higher Education that the university does not comment on ongoing litigation; the university’s attorneys also declined to comment. A lawyer for the student complainants did not respond to a request for comment.

When the first campus closure trials took place last year, the courts seemed skeptical legal arguments from plaintiffs, dismissing dozens of initial cases. But since then many more have been allowed to stand trial despite repeated attempts by universities to block them. Some cases initially dismissed, such as those against American University, George Washington University and Baylor Universitywere revived by the Courts of Appeal at the beginning of this year.

Same goal, new tactic

Universities that have asked the courts to dismiss breach of contract suits often cite the “educational malpractice doctrine,” a legal argument that posits that educational institutions cannot be sued for the quality of the education they offer because “quality” is subjective and difficult to prove.

Many judges have denied these petitions because the students’ cases are not based on the quality of their education but on specific promises, namely in-person classes and on-campus residence, which were not provided due to of the pandemic.

“Almost all of [the institutions] lost that argument because the court said [students] don’t argue about the value of their education,” said Audrey Anderson, an attorney at Bass, Berry and Sims and former vice chancellor and general counsel at Vanderbilt University. “What they’re saying is, ‘You promised us certain things in a contract and one of those things was in-person education, and we didn’t get it. “”

USF’s case for dismissal, however, does not rest on an educational malpractice argument. Instead, it relies on a broad interpretation of the 11th Amendment to the US Constitution, also known as sovereign immunity. This is an argument that applies only to state-run public institutions. Another campus closure case in Florida, Verdini v. Miami Dade College, was fired by a different appeals court in April based on a similar sovereign immunity argument.

Anderson said that’s likely what made the USF case attractive to the Florida Supreme Court.

“The State Supreme Court will not be as interested in determining the factual obligations of the University of South Florida’s contracts. It’s not the kind of question they want to spend their time on,” she said. “But a question like what actions are state universities immune to? This is something that really deserves their attention.

USF attorneys say that as a public institution and therefore an extension of the state of Florida, the university cannot be sued by any citizen without state consent. Their appeal to the state Supreme Court argues that the circuit court erred in denying their motion to dismiss in June because plaintiff students should have to provide written proof of the contract terms they claim were violated. .

“The waiver of sovereign immunity for contract claims is limited to suits on express written contracts,” USF attorneys wrote in their petition.

The Circuit Court of Appeals, on the other hand, had stated that the USF Class Registration Agreement – which reads: “By clicking ‘Submit Changes’ below, I enter into a legal and binding contract with USF” – such as a potential written contract with students, although it does not list the specific services promised.

A legal lifeboat on the line

USF is not the only institution attempting to use sovereign immunity to block legal action against student campus closures. The University of North Carolina System appealed to its own state supreme court last month to reverse a lower court decision deny that motion to dismisswhich was also based on a sovereign immunity argument.

“This decision is not only inconsistent with North Carolina law and pleading standards, it also ignores the fundamental relationship between [UNC] and its students…and erodes the doctrine of sovereign immunity in a way that would invite a massive influx of litigation against the state and its agencies,” the UNC system petition claims.

Joshua Ellis, UNC system associate vice president for media relations, said Inside Higher Education that the system does not comment on ongoing disputes.

Even if USF’s argument succeeds in the state Supreme Court, it would not necessarily apply to public institutions in other states.

“It really varies from state to state as to what the state declared itself immune to,” Anderson said. “They could win in Florida and have the same facts in North Carolina and lose there, because North Carolina law is different.”

Many private universities facing similar breach of contract lawsuits have settled for $1 million, including deep-pocketed Ivy League institutions like brown university and Columbia University, and smaller institutions such as Lindenwood University in Missouri. But Anderson said that with the strength of their sovereign immunity claims at stake, it makes sense that USF and other public institutions would want to litigate rather than settle, even if their legal costs exceed any potential settlement sum.

“Public universities really want to strengthen sovereign immunity, so having the ability to clarify the law around the contours of that principle is the kind of case where an institution might reasonably say, ‘Let’s not settle, let’s get on with this. ‘” Anderson said. “The savings will be much greater if they can make it clear that students just can’t pursue this stuff.”

At the same time, she added, there is a danger that the USF scheme will backfire. If the state Supreme Court upholds the circuit court’s denial, not only will the university remain subject to the lawsuit, but the principle of sovereign immunity could be weakened.

“There is a danger that you will make the wrong decision, which will reduce things more than [institutions] I want them shrunk,” Anderson said. “There are always risks and rewards to be weighed against each other in litigation.”

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UGC: No obligation to publish in journals before the final doctoral thesis https://endgradeinflation.org/ugc-no-obligation-to-publish-in-journals-before-the-final-doctoral-thesis/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 22:43:35 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/ugc-no-obligation-to-publish-in-journals-before-the-final-doctoral-thesis/ IN NEW regulations for doctoral programs notified on Monday, the University Grants Commission (UGC) has removed the requirement to publish research articles in peer-reviewed journals before final submission of a doctoral thesis (PhD in philosophy). Until now, it was mandatory for M.Phil (Master of Philosophy) scholarship holders to present at least one research paper at […]]]>

IN NEW regulations for doctoral programs notified on Monday, the University Grants Commission (UGC) has removed the requirement to publish research articles in peer-reviewed journals before final submission of a doctoral thesis (PhD in philosophy).

Until now, it was mandatory for M.Phil (Master of Philosophy) scholarship holders to present at least one research paper at a conference or seminar, while PhD students had to publish at least one research paper in a peer-reviewed journal and make two paper presentations at conferences. or seminars before submitting their thesis for evaluation.

When contacted, Professor M Jagadesh Kumar, President of UGC, said that by removing the mandatory publication requirement, the higher education regulator has recognized that the “one size fits all” approach n is not desirable. Elaborating on the need to avoid a common approach to evaluating all disciplines, he pointed out that many computer science PhD students prefer to present their papers at conferences rather than publish in journals.

But that doesn’t mean doctoral students should stop publishing research papers in peer-reviewed journals, he said. “Focusing on high quality research will lead to publications in good journals, although it is not mandatory. This will add value when they apply for employment or post-doctoral opportunities,” he said. The Indian Express.

According to the latest available report of the All India Survey on Higher Education (AISHE), the number of doctoral enrollments increased from 126,451 to 202,550 (0.5% of total tertiary enrollment) between 2015-16 and 2019- 20.

In 2018, The Indian Express published a series of investigative reports on how India has become one of the biggest markets for substandard research journals many doctoral students have their papers published for a fee.

Following this, a four-member UGC committee chaired by P Balram, former director of the Indian Institute of Science in Bengaluru, had recommended that the publication of research material in “predatory” journals or presentations in conferences organized by their publishers is not considered. academic credit in any form.

In a draft regulation presented in March this year, the UGC had proposed that universities be allowed to develop their own guidelines in this area. He also sought public comment on replacing the term mandatory with “desirable”, but this clause has now been completely removed under the UGC (Minimum Standards and Procedures for the Award of a Doctorate) Final Regulations, 2022, notified on Monday.

The commission also dropped plans to have universities and colleges reserve at least 60% of their annual doctoral intake for qualified NET or JRF students, under revised doctoral regulations. In the draft regulations presented in March, the UGC had proposed that 60% of the total number of vacant seats in an academic year at a higher education institution be chosen from qualified NET/JRF students.

The draft regulations also provided for a common entrance test for admission to the doctorate. This also finds no mention in the final version of the guidelines, which means that universities and colleges will remain free to admit students via NET/JRF as well as entrance exams without having to meet a cap for admission. either of the two online categories. with the standards in force.

In cases where the selection of applicants is through entries made by individual universities, a weighting of 70% will be given to performance in the written test and 30% in the interview.

The final settlement, however, retains the part-time doctoral offer which is primarily aimed at working professionals aspiring to obtain a doctoral degree. IITs already allow such programs. “The relevant higher education institution shall obtain a certificate of no objection through the applicant for a part-time doctoral program from the competent authority of the organization where the applicant is employed…”, state the rules.

Under the revised regulations, those joining doctoral programs after a four-year UG program can do so after a one-year master’s degree, while graduates of conventional three-year UG degrees must have completed a two-year master’s degree. .

Applicants who have completed the M.Phil programs with at least 55% overall marks are also included in the eligibility criteria. Although the M.Phil program will be phased out with notification of the new rules, it will not affect M.Phil degree programs that have already started.

To ensure the quality of their results, researchers previously had to appear before a research advisory board once every six months and present the progress of their work for further assessment and advice. They will now have to do it every semester.

“I urge universities to ensure that the process for evaluating doctorates is strengthened and that researchers are trained to publish in peer-reviewed journals, present at conferences and apply for patents where possible,” said Professor Jagadesh Kumar.

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Forward-looking ODU is where innovation meets possibility – The Virginian-Pilot https://endgradeinflation.org/forward-looking-odu-is-where-innovation-meets-possibility-the-virginian-pilot/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 22:06:26 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/forward-looking-odu-is-where-innovation-meets-possibility-the-virginian-pilot/ A. Bruce Bradley is President of the Board of Visitors at Old Dominion University. (HANDOUT) Old Dominion University began a new chapter in its storied history on October 21 with the inauguration of its ninth leader and the announcement of our $500 million capital campaign. In this new chapter, ODU is looking forward in its […]]]>

Old Dominion University began a new chapter in its storied history on October 21 with the inauguration of its ninth leader and the announcement of our $500 million capital campaign. In this new chapter, ODU is looking forward in its mission and working with a foundation rooted in innovation.

Higher education faces strong headwinds. Coming out of the pandemic, the need to think differently has accelerated and ODU is responding. We are finalizing a five-year strategic plan designed to propel us into the future. We build on our tradition of providing a world-class education to a diverse student body and ensuring that higher education continues to deliver on our promise to improve lives for generations.

Brian O. Hemphill, Ph.D., is the president of Old Dominion University.

We are proud to have been awarded the prestigious designation of Research Institution 1 of the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. This recognition reinforces our focus on conducting research that impacts our community and the world. Our R1 status highlights the exceptional talent of our researchers, professors and students who seek answers to difficult questions in all disciplines. And that puts us in elite company, alongside some of the world’s best-known research institutions. Only 3% of higher education institutions in the country have achieved Research 1 recognition.

We listen to Commonwealth employers and create new, in-demand programs that meet their education and workforce needs. For example, in 2015, ODU had 11 students enrolled in a new cybersecurity program. Today, more than 1,100 students are engaged in this flagship program. In every industry, data is key to making informed decisions with tactical precision, and the need for a skilled data science workforce has never been greater. ODU recently committed to expanding its longstanding work in data science, which is at the center of economic development activity. As such, ODU recently announced a new Data Science Learning and Research Center in Virginia Beach to expand its critical work with students in data collection and interpretation.

Our region’s greatest research asset with the most untapped economic potential surrounds us: water. To that end, ODU is adding the School of Supply Chain, Logistics and Maritime Operations to create a workforce pipeline for the Port of Virginia, shipyards, defense industry and the manufacturers. Hampton Roads will be an international model of innovation in blue technology, and ODU will be at the center.

Part of our necessary evolution includes growing our pioneering distance learning platform into ODUGlobal, providing best-in-class education solutions to the world. We will make significant improvements to the student experience of online learning, while focusing on digital innovation.

Our students will learn in state-of-the-art facilities designed for hands-on learning environments where they can work collaboratively. This summer, the new Health Sciences Building will house an experiential learning space for the Schools of Dental Hygiene and Rehabilitation Sciences, as well as the Sofia and David Konikoff Dental Hygiene Care Center and the Faschini Center. Wallach for restorative therapies. In 2026, we will add a five-story, 160,000 square foot biology building.

We will be innovative, impactful, and intentional to address our region’s public health disparities and the deep need to build a talented workforce and expand access to needed health care. Partnering with Eastern Virginia Medical School and Norfolk State University to establish the ONE School of Public Health is just the beginning. We will not be able to address the region’s significant health disparities without bold action, which is why we are exploring integration with EVMS to create a strong academic health science center that powers the region. . Each institution offers complementary strengths that together make us stronger. Integration will be a catalyst for change in Hampton Roads and across the Commonwealth. From our first day as strong collaborators and full partners, EVMS and ODU would become the largest healthcare program provider in Virginia.

The University and Board of Visitors are grateful for the unwavering support of campus, the community and the Commonwealth. ODU is the academic, cultural and research cornerstone of Hampton Roads. With ODU’s nearly $2 billion annual economic impact in the region, together we are helping to build a better future for all.

R. Bruce Bradley is president of the Board of Visitors of Old Dominion University. Brian O. Hemphill, Ph.D. is president of the ODU.

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EKU and Baptist Health Announce Naming Rights Partnership https://endgradeinflation.org/eku-and-baptist-health-announce-naming-rights-partnership/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 00:28:00 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/eku-and-baptist-health-announce-naming-rights-partnership/ RICHMOND, Ky. – Baptist Health and Eastern Kentucky University today announced the signing of an 11-year naming rights partnership for the arena inside Alumni Coliseum. The deal provides the university with $2.5 million. Effective immediately, the EKU basketball and volleyball teams will now play on the Paul S. McBrayer field at Baptist Health Arena. “An […]]]>

RICHMOND, Ky. – Baptist Health and Eastern Kentucky University today announced the signing of an 11-year naming rights partnership for the arena inside Alumni Coliseum. The deal provides the university with $2.5 million.

Effective immediately, the EKU basketball and volleyball teams will now play on the Paul S. McBrayer field at Baptist Health Arena.

“An investment of this magnitude will enable the University to enhance our student-athlete experience, our Colonel fan experience, but also the service we provide to our community,” said EKU President David McFaddin. “Alumni Coliseum is the gateway to EKU, welcoming thousands of students, alumni and community members each year. This facility is a staple in Richmond, whether launch ceremonies or entertainment events. We are proud to have the Baptist Health name on one of our most iconic EKU spaces. We look forward to seeing what opportunities this partnership will provide.”

McBrayer Arena has been the home of EKU basketball since the 1963-64 season. EKU volleyball has been playing at the venue since 1991. The arena currently seats 6,500 fans and was upgraded with a state-of-the-art Daktronics HD video card in 2013 and new flooring and lighting in 2014.

“As EKU students, family members, faculty and alumni cheer on the Colonels, we hope the Baptist Health logo that adorns this arena will continually remind them that quality healthcare is nearby. in this Kentucky market – and many others – that offer Baptist Health. brand of care through our hospitals, providers, and thousands of other caregivers in the communities we serve,” said Aaron Thompson, PhD, Chairman of the Board of Baptist Health, EKU Professor Emeritus and graduated from EKU.

“We appreciate the opportunity to support not only the health of our communities, but also an excellent educational institution such as EKU which prepares the workforce of the future,” said Gerard Colman, PhD, CEO of Baptist Health. “We have a long history of working in partnership with EKU to educate and train students for vital and practical roles in their communities, especially for much-needed healthcare positions.”

“I could not be more excited and honored by this appointment opportunity with EKU. As President of Baptist Health Richmond, I am beaming with pride that Baptist Health has entered into this long-term partnership, as it clearly demonstrates the commitment of our system to EKU, our market and the community of Richmond,” said Greg D. Gerard. “This latest partnership speaks volumes about the great things happening at EKU and the communities we serve. wonderful!

“Baptist Health Richmond has a long-standing partnership with EKU and provides meaningful, real-world experiences for EKU students in a variety of fields, working within the hospital. Over 60 students have been placed at Baptist Health Richmond since January 2022, representing health care careers in dietetics, medical laboratory science, physiotherapy, health administration, health behavioral and various nursing degree programs. Additionally, more than a dozen Baptist Health Richmond employees use Baptist’s strong tuition reimbursement program to earn degrees in nursing, business administration, psychology, and criminal justice. including patient beds), participating in Clinician in the Classroom projects and providing adjunct teachers.

“Eastern Kentucky University and EKU Athletics are fortunate to have a relationship with such an exceptional organization as Baptist Health,” said Vice President and Athletic Director Matt Roan. “Baptist Health is recognized across the Commonwealth and beyond, and together we are committed to leading excellence and creating a positive difference in the communities we serve. We are extremely grateful for this partnership and their investment in the Colonels’ future. This is the second corporate naming rights partnership for an EKU athletics facility. The Roy Kidd Stadium playing surface was renamed CG Bank Field in September.

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The “Gift” economy of higher education that continues to give https://endgradeinflation.org/the-gift-economy-of-higher-education-that-continues-to-give/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 10:53:11 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/the-gift-economy-of-higher-education-that-continues-to-give/ On October 12, the Union government issued a India Gazette notification entitled “International Financial Services Centers Authority (Establishment and Operation of International Campuses and Offshore Education Centres) Regulations 2022”. The International Campuses (IBCs) and Offshore Education Centers (OECs), as per the notification, will be set up in Gujarat International Finance-Tec City, Ahmedabad, or GIFT City, […]]]>

On October 12, the Union government issued a India Gazette notification entitled “International Financial Services Centers Authority (Establishment and Operation of International Campuses and Offshore Education Centres) Regulations 2022”.

The International Campuses (IBCs) and Offshore Education Centers (OECs), as per the notification, will be set up in Gujarat International Finance-Tec City, Ahmedabad, or GIFT City, an IT-focused business district and finance.

Among the objectives set out in the notification are:

Allow foreign universities to establish international branches in the GIFT International Financial Services Center (IFSC) either on a stand-alone basis or in any other form authorized by the authority;

Allow a foreign educational institution other than a foreign university to establish an OEC in the GIFT IFSC;

Ensure world-class education in GIFT IFSC.

To be eligible, in addition to financial stability, “the applicant [the foreign university seeking to set up a campus in India] should have achieved a Top 500 position in the overall world rankings and/or subject rankings in the latest QS World Universities Rankings”. But, interestingly, the institution that creates the CABs does not have to be a university at all, by the standards.

These campuses may also offer research programs in financial management, fintech, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

The notification insists that “any course or program provided by an entity registered in the GIFT IFSC must be identical in all respects to the course or program provided by the parent entity in its home jurisdiction.” The supreme regulator of any ECA would be the International Financial Services Centers Authority.

The notification states that “all transactions effected by the IBC or the OEC will be effected only in freely convertible currencies”.

Under the “miscellaneous” heading, the notification has two elements:

All obligations of the parent entity in its home jurisdiction for the conduct of courses or programs in an offshore jurisdiction must be met by IBC or OEC, as applicable.

The parent entity is allowed to repatriate profits, if any, without any restriction.

There are several points of interest in the notification, some of which should stop us halfway in terms of what they may possibly mean for higher education.

A gift from higher education

So, the notification offers the gift of foreign institutions, with their research programs and courses, to Indian students. None of us can argue with the opening of such doors of opportunity, of course, unless we are among those blind ideologues who stress the primacy of the “local” over the “global” (until the ideologues discover, advantage, foreign scholarships to solicit!). So it is indeed a gift of higher education for those of our students who can afford these institutions.

That the quality of education offered by universities in the top 500 QS is rigorous, up-to-date and in line with the demands of the 21st century is also something that we can perhaps expect, being open-minded about these questions. It would be a gift too.

Again, no squabbling about it, unless we’re among those complacent professors who haven’t read a word after their own doctorates (extending the benefit of the doubt, we assume they did read then) and refuse to improve their curriculum because it has “worked so far”, that is, it has remained unchanged since its inception.

With specialized courses and programs in the areas listed in the notification – which ostensibly ignores all social sciences, arts, humanities but retains management, engineering, mathematics – we believe, being open in this regard as well , that we will produce better technocrats, scientists and managerial classes. It is definitely a gift.

So far, so good.

The new freedoms

A Newscast about the notification, citing people familiar with the matter, noted that the regulations were intended to address some of the obstacles that foreign universities have faced in coming to India, such as fees and administrative control, setting up implementation of the reservation policy and the precondition that they must be a non-profit entity.

Apparently, foreign universities faced “hurdles” in the form of our constitutional arrangements – the control exercised by our regulatory bodies such as the University Grants Commission and the All India Council for Technical Education – and the fact that State-funded universities be a good public agency rather than a profit-making enterprise. Thus, facilitating the education of historically disenfranchised peoples is a so-called “barrier”.

Implementing a fee structure, ignoring the ground realities of Indian student demographics, many of whom are first-generation literates even today, being blind to the urgency of access and equality opportunities for this demographic, prohibit subsidies that are essential allowing a semblance of equality: these are some of the “freedoms” offered to CABs by this notification. Higher education accessible to all then seems to no longer be a national objective.

The regulatory authority for these CABs is the International Financial Services Centers Authority, not UGC or AICTE, which in itself is an interesting decision in the same period that UGC and AICTE are , at least temporarily, under the same president. So, to put it roughly, higher education in these CAB cases will be audited by an accounting agency.

Alternatives in higher education

The notification also suggested that our own institutions had failed to provide quality education (never mind that our education is still affordable, subsidized and taking into account our student populations).

The OECs will offer research programs in these same areas which are the flagship programs of our IITs, IIMs, IISERs, some universities and the IISc. Certainly not everything of these “temples of modern India” feature in the QS World Rankings. But many of them are: in terms of citations, research publications and professor profiles. They produced scientists and engineers who now work in the best universities, research centers and commercial organizations in the world.

In the words of the president of india herself said at the recent ITI-Delhi Diamond Jubilee celebrations, “In more ways than one, the story of ITI is the story of independent India. A truer word has never been spoken, we’d like to believe.

So why do we assume that quality education not emerge from our IITs, IIMs and universities, thus necessitating the arrival of OECs without any limits to their freedoms?

Did we assume that our professors, researchers and students could no longer be in the top 500 or become ‘world class’ (if indeed the top 500 is where we want to be)?

Underfunded, over-regulated, with dilapidated infrastructure, poorly trained teachers and outdated curricula and teaching practices, our higher education is heading for extinction. Public institutions, not only in India but everywhere, have traditionally been seen as a “public good”, but are now increasingly seen as a “public threat” by demagogues who want future citizens to be drones rather than critical thinkers.

Instead of investing more time, energy and funds in reviving them and enabling our students to have a better education and skills adapted to the demands of a different world, we are busy “offering” the system to anyone who has the money to set up a CAB.

Whereas studies show that some forward-looking universities seek to ensure better student success rates by changing financial and leadership policies, we seem to assume that the OEC, and the OEC alone, will ensure success, but only for those who can pay a fortune for that.

Are we regulating faculty recruitment to ensure that only the best and most committed enter the system or are we simply seeking to fill vacancies? Is our research program rigorous and up-to-date? And do we religiously implement practices and principles of academic integrity (dare we review the publications of professors, deans, vice-chancellors)?

The most unpleasant question – beyond that of access to these programs in the city of GIFT – is this: are we witnessing a new imperialism in the field of higher education? Related questions would include: Are students from formerly colonized nations being drawn into a new global governance and financial structure through “quality” education? Would this two-tier system create a ghetto for those who enter through the gates of our crumbling public university because they cannot afford the “gift” of the OEC?

The other students would be the alternatives to those who receive the OEC gifts, native but not quite!

The gift, argued the most famous theorist of the idea, Marcel Mauss, enables a social relationship through giving, receiving and reciprocity. In the exchange of gifts, there is a obligation return the favour. In the new imperialism, like Kazuo Ishuguro’s “donors” Never let Me Gowe give gifts to CABs without expecting any obligation from them.

This is the new gift economy of the modern era.

Professor Anna Kurian contributed to this story.

Pramod K. Nayar is a professor in the Department of English, University of Hyderabad.

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Letter to the Editor: Former Burbank High Student Reflects on BUSD Book Ban https://endgradeinflation.org/letter-to-the-editor-former-burbank-high-student-reflects-on-busd-book-ban/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 21:42:55 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/letter-to-the-editor-former-burbank-high-student-reflects-on-busd-book-ban/ The last two years of my high school experience revolved around working on diversity, equity, and inclusivity. I led the Black Student Union at Burbank High School and repeatedly attempted to voice my concerns about the Burbank Unified School District’s (BUSD) “temporary ban” on books containing the n-word. As a result, I now have the […]]]>

The last two years of my high school experience revolved around working on diversity, equity, and inclusivity. I led the Black Student Union at Burbank High School and repeatedly attempted to voice my concerns about the Burbank Unified School District’s (BUSD) “temporary ban” on books containing the n-word. As a result, I now have the opportunity to work with PEN America, a “non-profit organization that seeks to defend and celebrate free speech around the world,” on book ban advocacy. I have since graduated from Burbank High and am pursuing a degree in Critical Diversity Studies at the University of San Francisco. Yet, I continue to voice my concerns about the BUSD’s nearly three-year black literature ban. I have seen the real implications of black policing in schools. I came face to face with the reality that remains when these voices are silenced. Darkness in any form is becoming too taboo for anyone to associate with in a classroom.

In a letter that Burbank Unified Superintendent Matt Hill released in 2020 to address the first round of book bans for the school district, he said, “I want to emphasize that the board and I fully support the fight against racism, even if it is uncomfortable work. It hurts to know that no matter how deeply I immerse myself in the knowledge of my oppression, yet as long as I exist I will never have the privilege of seeing racism as a malaise because to pretend that prejudices are uncomfortable would be like suspending every moment of my waking up in pain. I’m tired of giving white people the benefit of the doubt when regulating black presence. I’m tired of struggling with the trivialities that white people ask me to debate. I don’t care if you consider yourself a racist or not; it’s not your story to tell, and it’s not your life to live. It’s not your story or your ancestry, and we don’t need your approval to advocate for space in our classrooms.

To depoliticize the current conversation around book bans, many educators rely on the First Amendment ban, but in truth, this issue goes beyond free speech. The climate of book censorship in America today centers on power and exclusion. As author Koa Beck states in her book, White Feminism, “diversity is about changing perceptions of whiteness rather than the whiteness of organizations.” The banning of books today is a direct reaction to white educational institutions losing their power to define diversity within structures of exclusion.

A reporter told me that my story regarding the BUSD book ban may not be relevant enough to be in the media, as it started two years ago, following BLM and the murder of George Floyd. Privilege allows those who have the possibility to distance themselves from the suffering of others. I’ve spoken to enough media professionals to gauge the appeal of my point of view. To be deemed suitable, I must specify that racism is still relevant. To fit into this mold – a mold that inherently works in systems that do not allow me to speak in the first place – I have observed that the “blackness” as a whole within the American educational system is a object. It does not matter if the educational institution promotes or hinders the presence of blacks. “Blackness” becomes a support for political relations, a signal of virtue or another entity that upholds the values ​​of white supremacy.

White liberalism still relies on ideas and systems of exclusion that suppress the success of blacks, browns and queers. As Bell Hooks states in his essay “The Racial Politics of Mass Media,” “Placed in positions of authority in educational structures and in the workplace, whites could oversee and eradicate organized resistance. The new neo-colonial environment [in the 20th century] gave whites even greater control over the African-American mind. Education systems were built to perpetuate white power and control. In Burbank, which was and arguably still is a sunset city, there is a desperate need for exclusion, classism and racism to still define what is and isn’t acceptable. The question of the censorship of Mildred D. Taylor but never of Anthony Burgess rests on the assertion of narratives rooted in traditional hegemony. There will always be those who hold power in academia who believe that censorship of books is necessary, because exposing these perspectives, which would otherwise be silenced, would arouse in students a critical look at the very systems that maintain their wages.

When PEN America first contacted me, they communicated that my school district’s book ban was a different situation than the bans that were happening across the country. Burbank has taken a liberal stance on censorship. While I agree that my city and my school district had no intention of being overtly racist in silencing black literature, there is no difference between monitoring black being, history and voice of a liberal white superintendent than a conservative. My school district has made only a few random attempts to connect with black students in my two years with the council on DEI work, and no attempt to unite black students and build a black community.

I often feel like my presence isn’t meant to be felt – as if I’m sandwiched between two masses of concrete. That I should be electric wires between the walls of a tall, dark building, but I can feel my veins throbbing and my neck choking under the weight that drags me deeper into my own hell. This is the best visual representation I can give of the systems that oppress us. The most sinister aspect of patriarchal white supremacy is that it festers from within you, only for the outside world to confirm those same systems of exclusion and bring us closer to becoming unidentifiable within the masses of our suffering. Not only do these systems make us sit, but they do so in a way where we feel like it was our choice to sit.

This country sits on a token base of bigotry and exclusion as it literally sits on stolen lands and murdered peoples. Regardless of the future of book censorship in America, there will be students who deviate from traditional paths of education—students who must stray from those paths because they were never built with space for them. This country can still control our being. However, they do not know what power we hold behind the shadows of their structures.

“For people of color, gaining knowledge in this land makes tyrants quiver and shake on their sandy foundation.” – David Walker, American abolitionist.

Madison Clevenger
University of San Francisco

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Government to raise Tk15,000 for three projects through sukuk https://endgradeinflation.org/government-to-raise-tk15000-for-three-projects-through-sukuk/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 03:25:00 +0000 https://endgradeinflation.org/government-to-raise-tk15000-for-three-projects-through-sukuk/ The government will raise 15,000 crore taka by issuing Islamic bond sukuk to fund three ongoing development projects, officials say. The Ministry of Finance initially selected the projects, which will be completed by 2023. Ministry documents show that project executing agencies were recently invited to review project plans for Islamic finance. The projects are as […]]]>

The government will raise 15,000 crore taka by issuing Islamic bond sukuk to fund three ongoing development projects, officials say.

The Ministry of Finance initially selected the projects, which will be completed by 2023. Ministry documents show that project executing agencies were recently invited to review project plans for Islamic finance.

The projects are as follows: establishment of 329 schools and technical colleges in the upazilas, development of some private secondary schools and the development project of key urban infrastructures (2nd phase).

According to sources, the total cost of the projects has been estimated at Tk 34,500 crore, almost half of which will be financed by the Islamic bond.

The sukuk is a long-term financing instrument without traditional banking circuits. Against investments, sukuk investors are offered profits instead of fixed interest, which is forbidden in Islam.

To meet budgetary expenditures, the government depends on revenue collection, treasury bills and bonds, bank loans and savings certificates.

Officials said they are now seeking long-term financing for major projects through sukuk, as revenue collection has fallen short of expectations, while project costs are on the rise.

Islamic banks and other financial institutions can come for long-term investments through sukuk. In his FY23 budget speech, Finance Minister AHM Mustafa Kamal mentioned that the introduction of sukuk instrument has created huge opportunities for Shariah-based banks to participate in the government development process. .

At the start of the 2020-2021 financial year, the government issued Tk 8,000 crore sukuk bonds for a massive water supply project. The following year, further sukuk bonds to the tune of Tk 10,000 crore were issued, including Tk 5,000 crore of the amount invested in the government primary school development project.

The project to build 329 schools and technical colleges, which this time will use the highest Tk 10,000 of funds raised in sukuk, was approved by the Executive Committee of the National Economic Council (Ecnec) in January 2020.

The cost of the project has been estimated at Tk 20,525 crore as the government has to finance all the works from its own resources.

The project includes land acquisition, development, administration building, teachers’ dormitory, 200-bed student dormitory, shaheed minar, memorial, purchase of vehicles, machinery and teaching equipment and learning.

Project director Sayed Masum Ahmed Choudhury said the land acquisition process was ongoing. The authorities have already acquired land for five schools. Construction of an educational facility is underway.

“The land acquisition and construction of the remaining schools will begin gradually,” he told The Business Standard.

The government intends to fund one-third of the “some private secondary schools development project” through sukuk. The estimated cost of the project is Tk 10,649 crore as the government wants to raise Tk 3,500 crore through sukuk.

With the Department of Education Engineering as the executing agency, the project deadline is 2018-203.

Under the project, four-storey college buildings are being constructed in remote areas, six-storey college buildings in urban areas, and five-storey college buildings are being constructed, leaving the ground floor vacant in haor areas.

Until June 2021, the average progress of the project was 56%, with expenditure amounting to around Tk 6,000 crore.

In 2019, the government commissioned the “Important Urban Infrastructure Development Project (2nd Phase)” involving Tk 3,465 crore in 281 municipalities. The government wants to finance about half of the cost through sukuk.

The local government’s engineering department is implementing the project with a deadline of December 2023.

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